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PROCOL HARUM

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Procol Harum picture
Procol Harum biography
Formed 1967 in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, UK - Disbanded in 1977 - Reformed in 1991 and still active as of 2017

PROCOL HARUM came out of the ashes from a band called the PARAMOUNTS that had its roots back in 59 (!!) and had split in early 66. Gary Brooker meet lyricist Keith Reid and began writing songs and by 1967, it became clear that they would need the help from their old colleagues from PARAMOUNTS days to form their new band to be called PROCOL HARUM. They developed a really new sound with two KB (piano for Brooker and Hammond organ for Fisher) and a guitarist extraordinaire called Robin Trower who was greatly influenced by JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE. They quickly became one of the precursor of progressive rock (along the MOODY BLUES and The NICE) and mixed in some classical influences (BACH in "Whiter Shade of Pale") and sold millions of singles but also albums.

They became the first band to build a multi-movement suite that lasted a whole side and this was in early 68 in their second album called "Shine on Brightly" and became a real influence for all progressive groups to come. By their fourth album "Home", the sound had evolved to an almost hard-rock but by the following one, the guitarist Robin Trower left for a long and successful solo career, leaving Brooker alone at the driving wheel. From their "Grand Hotel" album, the sound will be tamer but still explosive but all of the succeeding album would follow suit, the band still enjoyed many hit singles. Until they folded in 77, victim of the punk wave. They sporadically reform around the Brooker-Reid duo and Fisher to record a new album and small tour, the most recent being in 2003.

PROCOL HARUM is highly recommended for all the progheads who are interested in the birth of prog and its roots as well as its inventive use of an symphonic orchestra often used a real instrument in their music.

: : : Hugues Chantraine, BELGIUM : : :

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PROCOL HARUM discography


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PROCOL HARUM top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.90 | 367 ratings
Procol Harum [Aka: A Whiter Shade of Pale]
1967
4.07 | 366 ratings
Shine On Brightly
1968
3.59 | 278 ratings
A Salty Dog
1969
3.56 | 182 ratings
Home
1970
3.35 | 167 ratings
Broken Barricades
1971
3.89 | 255 ratings
Grand Hotel
1973
3.43 | 146 ratings
Exotic Birds And Fruit
1974
2.83 | 113 ratings
Procol's Ninth
1975
3.00 | 129 ratings
Something Magic
1977
2.42 | 81 ratings
Prodigal Stranger
1991
3.04 | 92 ratings
The Well's On Fire
2003
3.30 | 57 ratings
Novum
2017

PROCOL HARUM Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.09 | 138 ratings
Live In Concert With The Edmonton Symphony Orchestra
1972
4.05 | 19 ratings
BBC Live in Concert
2000
3.67 | 9 ratings
One More Time
2003
4.10 | 30 ratings
In Concert With The Danish National Concert Orchestra And Choir
2009

PROCOL HARUM Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.17 | 16 ratings
Live (DVD)
2002
4.13 | 21 ratings
Live at The Union Chapel
2004
4.74 | 23 ratings
In Concert With The Danish National Concert Orchestra And Choir
2009

PROCOL HARUM Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.95 | 3 ratings
The Best of Procol Harum [Fly]
1971
3.02 | 10 ratings
The Best of Procol Harum [A&M]
1972
4.29 | 7 ratings
Rock Roots
1976
4.77 | 4 ratings
Procol Harum's greatest Hits Vol.1 (Pickwick)
1982
2.67 | 3 ratings
Portfolio
1988
3.04 | 10 ratings
Chrysalis Years 1973-1977
1989
3.07 | 5 ratings
The Definitive Collection
1992
3.44 | 6 ratings
Homburg & Other Hats: Procol Harum's Best
1995
4.12 | 48 ratings
Various Artists: The Long Goodbye
1995
3.09 | 4 ratings
Classics Volume 17 (aka Greatest Hits)
1996
4.21 | 10 ratings
30th Anniversary Anthology
1997
0.00 | 0 ratings
Halcyon Daze: The Best of Procol Harum
1997
3.05 | 2 ratings
Three Classic Albums
1998
4.67 | 6 ratings
Pandora's Box
1999
3.50 | 2 ratings
Procol Harum, The Best Of (Golden Times)
2001
4.00 | 4 ratings
Whiter Shade Of Pale
2001
3.75 | 4 ratings
Singles, A's and B's
2002
4.17 | 9 ratings
Classic Tracks and Rarities: An Anthology
2002
4.75 | 4 ratings
Procol Harum/Shine On Brightly
2002
4.08 | 6 ratings
First Four
2003
4.00 | 5 ratings
A Salty Dog / Home
2003
4.04 | 7 ratings
Secrets Of The Hive - The Best Of Procul Harum
2007
3.41 | 8 ratings
All This And More... - A 4-Disc Compendium
2009
4.00 | 1 ratings
Still There'll Be More - An Anthology 1967-2017
2018

PROCOL HARUM Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.53 | 21 ratings
A Whiter Shade Of Pale
1967
3.40 | 5 ratings
Quite Rightly So
1968
3.96 | 6 ratings
Homburg
1968
4.04 | 8 ratings
A Salty Dog
1969
4.04 | 9 ratings
Conquistador (live)
1972
3.00 | 2 ratings
Robert's Box
1973
3.33 | 3 ratings
Souvenir Of London
1973
3.50 | 4 ratings
Nothing But The Truth
1974
3.80 | 5 ratings
Pandora's Box
1975
3.00 | 1 ratings
Something Magic
1977
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Truth Won't Fade Away
1991
3.00 | 1 ratings
(You Can't) Turn Back the Page
1991
2.00 | 1 ratings
A Whiter Shade Of Pale - 40th Anniversary Edition
2007
3.31 | 4 ratings
Missing Persons (Alive Forever)
2021

PROCOL HARUM Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Shine On Brightly by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1968
4.07 | 366 ratings

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Shine On Brightly
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by WJA-K

4 stars This record has - arguably - the first prog epic ever. There have been long songs before, but none of them appears to qualify as a prog track. In Held 'Twas In I does.

In Held 'Twas In I is brilliant. It's every inch a prog classic. It's very obvious to me that acts like Genesis and Aphrodite's Child followed in their footsteps. On top of that, it is engaging, fun and brilliantly played. a solid 10 out of 10, certainly considering the time it was released. A time of experimentation indeed, but none had followed this path. 10/10

The rest of the album is more straightforward Procol Harum Is I have come to know them (through the classic tracks Whiter and Homburg).

Quite Rightly So is a great tune and should have been a hit 9/10

Shine on Brightly is another strong track. I especially like the squeaking guitar. 8/10

Skip Softly start rather uninteresting, but halfway through it totally changes and turns into an epic 8/10

Wish Me Well is a straight-up blues track. nothing wrong with it and confidently played and sang 7.5/10

Rambling On is very much what I know and love of Procol Harum. It has a resemblance with Homburg and Wither. 8/10

Magdalena starts the second side and introduces the epic. Another one that is close to their staple sound. 7.5/10

This album is a piece of the puzzle of prog. And on top of that, it is great. I thought about giving it five stars. The second side deserves it. But the first is merely very good. So 4 stars it is.

 Shine On Brightly by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1968
4.07 | 366 ratings

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Shine On Brightly
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

4 stars 1968's 'Shine On Brightly' is truly a little art rock gift from the famous British band Procol Harum, best known for their 1967 hit single 'A Whiter Shade of Pale' (that has sold more than ten million copies by now). Being the band's second full-length studio album, it is obviously a continuation and somewhat of an expansion of the sound of their self-titled psychedelic/baroque-pop tinted rock debut LP. 'Shine On Brightly', however, dares to break some new ground, it dares to be more adventurous, and perhaps for the first time, more progressive. Whether universally accepted as one or not, this record has to be fabulous example of at least proto-prog (if not full-blown progressive rock), with the grandeur of the 17-minute multi-part album closer 'In Held 'Twas In I', properly titled from an acrostic and signifying nothing. It does not get more prog than that, at least in 1968.

'Shine On Brightly' features Gary Brooker on vocals and piano, Robin Trower on guitar and vocals, Matthew Fisher on piano, organ and vocals, Dave Knights on bass guitar, B. J. Wilson on drums, and finally, Keith Reid's lyrics. Side one is occupied by a couple of nice, more radio-friendly psych-pop tracks, definitely good material, as the band display fine songwriting skills as well as lovely instrumentation. Then side two opens with another 3-minute song in the same vein as the ones found on side one (maybe a tad bit more obscure, but still good), just to let the big winner of the album to unfold before the ears of the listeners - 'In Held 'Twas In I', or the first really big progressive rock epic. The band were quite ambitious for assembling this great composition, linking together all the different parts in a gorgeous manner, pretty much in the spirit of what would become a recognizable trait of many long songs representing the 70s art rock revolution in the face of bands like Yes, Jethro Tull, ELP, Genesis, Crimson, Floyd and many more. The song also features various influences, another testimony for its prog credentials, stepping firmly into symphonic rock, classical, baroque pop, and eventually a bit of psychedelia, alongside the narrative of the first part 'Glimpses of Nirvana'.

All in all, 'Shine On Brightly' is from one side the proof that Procol Harum was not just some one-hit wonder band, also acknowledging the fact that they went on to release good albums after this one, and from another, it is a great collection of early, more accessible art rock songs, full of energy, picturing an interesting episode in the development of one of rock music's most enigmatic and pompous subgenres.

 Missing Persons (Alive Forever) by PROCOL HARUM album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2021
3.31 | 4 ratings

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Missing Persons (Alive Forever)
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by SteveG

3 stars This EP/Single from the late Gary Brooker, and his latest line up of Procol Harum bandmates, is a nice post card from the long time rocker and reunites him with long time Procol lyricist Keith Reid. The first song "Missing Persons" is a mid tempo ballad bemoaning the loss and disappearance of persons known over time. It has the Bach inspired organ flourishes that Procol was known for back in the day and is a decent song with a strong melody line. "War Is Not Healthy", with it's funky blues inspired shuffle and loud group choruses is much more exciting. Amazingly, Brooker can still stretch his voice over this quick moving lively tune. The anti war sentiments, or chants to be more precise, penned by Reid are quite simple but still effective, especially in the wake of the current Ukraine\Russian conflict. Written by both Brooker and Reid many months ago, it just goes to show that these sentiments will, unfortunately, never go out of fashion. 3 stars for songs that feel quite workman like, well performed and well polished, but never really fly high enough to grab your attention.
 A Whiter Shade Of Pale by PROCOL HARUM album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1967
4.53 | 21 ratings

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A Whiter Shade Of Pale
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by DangHeck

4 stars Released just 4 months before their debut and self-titled album (on which this, our A-side track, appeared on US pressings), "A Whiter Shade of Pale" is one of those tracks that has been christened by the press and critics specifically as eternal, a must-hear and one of the greatest songs of all time. Under most circumstances, why would and how could we ignore that? What's crazy about this historical and continued regard is that this is their first ever release! Hell, I'm certainly impressed. More-so considered to be Baroque Pop than Progressive Pop/Rock, this is a more straight-ahead number, much like the majority of music found on their debut. The instrumentation is excellent though, with perfectly loose (sloppy?) Ringo drag, open, soaring organ and warm bass. Brooker's voice is clear and classic and the lyrics are certainly beautiful.

This is my first time actually hearing its B-side, "Lime Street Blues", rootsy and, of course, bluesy. Once again, evidence in their early discography that this is a post-Dylan, post-The Band world, and they're just livin' in it. Very alright with it. It is an interesting juxtaposition to "Whiter Shade", but as a single of course it works great. Rootsy in its organ and bluesy in its piano and guitar lead. The drums are certainly something you could have found in many a Beat track of the '60s. Being merely a blues-driven R'n'B number does, though, bring this otherwise essential single down a peg. I'm sure you can guess with a mean average what I gave each side.

 Procol Harum [Aka: A Whiter Shade of Pale] by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.90 | 367 ratings

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Procol Harum [Aka: A Whiter Shade of Pale]
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by DangHeck

3 stars Another one from my own vaults--one I'm grateful to own as it's an album I have historically enjoyed--I am unfortunately reviewing in the wake of the passing of another great artist: this time, Gary Brooker (1945-2022). Brooker was the lead vocalist, pianist and a key songwriter for Procol Harum, along with The Moody Blues and The Nice, one of the earliest bands to bridge the gap between the psychedelic and... something else. In general, to compare them to their other peers, these bands were more artful, perhaps, and more classically inspired. This will be a review of the slightly different original UK-pressed version, self-titled and excluding the earlier, landmark radio hit "A Whiter Shade of Pale".

Our album starts with "Conquistador", a track that does not translate as simply Psychedelic Rock nor as simple, radio-ready Rock music (I suppose, too, this concept in general was still relatively new)--though it is relatively poppy--significant in 1967. We all know now that Procol Harum was a key producer of what we now know as (early) Progressive Rock. Perhaps, in the popular Psychedelic vein, a contemporary could be found in The Doors, but unlike them they have more Pop and more Soul. To me, therefore, innately British.

"She Wandered Through the Garden Fence" is a sure favorite of mine, I feel a must-hear from early Prog. Poppy, too, this has a memorable hook, bright organ (neo-classically poised, I must add) and straight- ahead rhythm, though I quite like the very-of-the-time drumming. Wonderfully placed next is "Something Following Me", a soulful number, but very straight, even in comparison to the former. With Beat, R'n'B and 'Northern Soul', as it were, the UK has had a longstanding love and appreciation for the genre.

Very other, we have the sort of honky-tonk "Mabel". It's cute haha. Interestingly enough, though at first glance I'd say it doesn't have a lot to offer, it does have some interesting textural choices. Gratefully, we move onto the very cool groove of "Cerdes (Outside the Gates Of)", a backwards name if there ever was one. This is organ-driven and features some nice, bluesy lead guitar throughout. Honestly, this latter element is one I often forget they have going for them. And they really do: great soloing.

Starting the second side with a memorable piano riff and simmering organ, "A Christmas Camel" (har-har) is another with sure Proto-Prog significance to my ears. This is followed by the upbeat "Kaleidoscope" (Boy, the Freaks really loved those things, didn't they?), with fuzzy guitar, Rock 'n' Roll piano and Ringo drag, much to my delight. Good track. Much more low and slow is "Salad Days (Are Here Again)" (God, I sure do know a lot of songs and albums entitled "Salad Days"...). This track is very R'n'B and yet also reminds me of the Roots Rock of mid-60s Bob Dylan (likely, really). The organ is nice, but ultimately the song is a low-light.

Next is "Good Captain Clack", a sort of Music Hall quickie but a goodie. Fun track with group vocals and what sounds like a Wurlitzer. The album then ends perhaps with the most progressive track of them all, "Repent Walpurgis", with cool, rolling drums, open organ and a strong build of guitar soloing to the middle section, a near-solo piano, which it itself builds with the rhythm section and a triumphant and yet wary classical-esque theme.

True Rate: 3.5/5.0

 A Whiter Shade Of Pale by PROCOL HARUM album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1967
4.53 | 21 ratings

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A Whiter Shade Of Pale
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by Progressive Enjoyer

5 stars "A Whiter Shade of Pale" is one of few songs that can be looked back upon and be seen as the highlight for one of the most legendary cultural phenomenon's of the last century. And to say it's not well deserved is a lie. In fact, it's without doubt one of the best songs of all time.

It's a very cleverly done song with "Bach-derived" arrangements, & a beautiful Hammond organ, which is compliment by some very atmospheric drums. & I couldn't go on without mentioning the absolutely amazing voice of Gary Brooker, which is beautifully deep, with beautiful depth and texture, something that would help propel Procol Harum's status to be one of the more well-known bands in the psychedelic scene.

Then there's the B-side, "Lime Street Blues", which is a good track, but nothing to right home about. It's just a simple fast paced blues song, & doesn't match all too well with the smash hit "Whiter Shade of Pale".

 Procol Harum [Aka: A Whiter Shade of Pale] by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.90 | 367 ratings

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Procol Harum [Aka: A Whiter Shade of Pale]
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by berkaal

3 stars Procol Harum - A Whiter Shade Of Pale - Repertoire REP 4666-WY The only prog thing in this album is the sound of Matthew Fisher hammond organ, and only in "Whiter...." and "Repent Walpurgis". No research, no classic influences apart from the title track, and I don't remember a choir or a second voice in any song, it's just the typical mid-sixties rhythm'n'blues english band. My version is original mono: bad mixing, instruments are often unintelligible, makes it hard to analyse the music.

The main flaw is Robin Trower: terrible guitarist, never add to arrangements, has awful guitar sounds and his solos are very far from good, never plays acoustic or clean electric guitar.

B.J. Wilson is not a good drummer, sometimes stumbles, loses rhythm, sounds weak.

Hard to judge David Knights, bass is non existent, drown in the mix, only in "Street Lime Blues" it stands out.

We've got two gems, "A Whiter Shade Of Pale" and "Homburg", three decent songs, "Conquistador", "She Wandered..." and "Lime Street Blues", the other are fillers, the worst is Mabel, in mono is really nonsense.

imho 691/1000

1 A Whiter Shade Of Pale - 4:06

2 Conquistador - 2:38

3 She Wandered Through The Garden Fence - 3:24

4 Something Following Me - 3:37

5 Mabel - 1:53

6 Cerdes (Outside The Gates Of) - 5:03

7 A Christmas Camel - 4:49

8 Kaleidoscope - 2:53

9 Salad Days (Are Here Again) - 3:38

10 Good Captain Clack - 1:30

11 Repent Walpurgis - 5:02

Bonus Tracks

12 Lime Street Blues - 2:59

13 Homburg - 3:55

14 Monsieur Armand - 2:23

15 Seem To Have The Blues All The Time - 2:46

1 - 100

2 - 78

3 - 71

4 - 62

5 - 55

6 - 60

7 - 61

8 - 66

9 - 63

10 - 64

11 - 65

12 - 74

13 - 95

14 - 62

15 - 61

 Shine On Brightly by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1968
4.07 | 366 ratings

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Shine On Brightly
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Of the early bands that have a major historical importance, PROCOL HARUM has gained relatively little attention in ProgArchives. Although the category Proto-Prog is used very sparingly here, I'd say both The Moody Blues and Procol Harum were essential proto-prog bands in the sixties before the prog genre per se was born, despite their categorizing as Crossover Prog. One of the strangest omissions in the history of rock was that Procol's 1967 debut single and the massive hit, Bach-inspired 'A Whiter Shade of Pale' wasn't originally included in their debut album of the same year, nor was 'Homburg', another very charming, organ-centred song. Surely the album would have been not only better but much more succesful with the help of them.

For the A side, their second LP Shine On Brightly mostly continued in the bluesy style of the debut. The opening track 'Quite Rightly So' is the only one of these regular length songs that the frontman Gary Brooker (vocals, piano, mellotron) co-composed with organist Matthew Fisher. The lyrics were always written by Keith Reid. The energetic song brings nicely together the blues flavour and the proto-proggish sound with the piano & organ combination they inherited from The Band. The title track has more memorable melodies and a wider dynamics in the arrangement, from Robin Trower's sharp electric guitar riff to Baroque reminding organ decorations. 'Skip Softly (My Moonbeams)' is an edgier and heavier song one would expect from such romantic title. The instrumental section gets pretty proggy too.

'Wish Me Well' is very bluesy and gritty and features Trower on lead vocals. Also 'Rambling On' gives a big role to the bluesy, distorted electric guitar sound, but the organ and piano are there too. As a composition it's quite forgettable anyway. 'Magdalene (My Regal Zonophone)' is a delight. Reid's surrealistic stream-of-consiousness lyrics form an amusing contradiction with the mellow music reminding of a funeral march.

What makes this album a milestone in the progressive rock history is the 17½-minute multi-part epic 'In Held 'Twas in I'. The first movement 'Glimpses of Nirvana' features speech parts to a great effect. The delicate section with just poem-reading and piano is impressive, suddenly followed by the cheerful ''Twas Teatime at the Circus', which does have a slight irritativeness in it: fortunately that part is very brief. The rest of the epic is a marvelous, adventurous journey full of deep emotional power, especially in the sections 'In the Autumn of My Madness' and 'Look to Your Soul'. All in all the epic -- with the obligatory 'Grand Finale' -- is a real tour de force, and a notable prototype of all prog epics such as 'Supper's Ready' by Genesis. The modern prog super group Transatlantic has recorded their version of it, but actually failed to bring anything crucially new into it. The original is so powerful and well done already.

I don't care to deal with the cd bonuses that are mostly rather uninteresting. 'In Held' is absolutely worth five stars, but the less appealing bluesy songs of the first side bring my rating down to four stars.

 Shine On Brightly by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1968
4.07 | 366 ratings

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Shine On Brightly
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by sgtpepper

4 stars Procol Harum may have been one of the most pretentious prog-related bands due to keyboards and compositonal style but that also helped them staying unique on top of having excellent vocalist, distinguishable bluesy-prog guitar played and having two keyboard players in teh band.

"Shine on Brightly" is rightfully considered to be the band's peak in the 60's due to an excellent fresh combination of pop/rock/prog. It is the last epic suite that provides many astonishing and jaw-dropping moments of gifted composers and players. Tasty guitar playing, ambitious music sections, perfect development of the entire composition and emotional end make the suite "In Held Twas in I" one of the most enigmatic and greatest suites of the late 60's. I've first heard the version by Transatlantic to search for the original version later. The original version sounds more authentic, while the cover is more technical!

Other highlights on the album is the melodic "Quite rightly so" with churning Hammond organ and the title track. This was maybe the artistic peak by the band as later efforts had repetitive elements and in the beginning of the 70's, the band sounded a bit dated.

You should start with this album to appreciate impact that the band made in the beginning of progressive rock.

 Broken Barricades by PROCOL HARUM album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.35 | 167 ratings

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Broken Barricades
Procol Harum Crossover Prog

Review by iluvmarillion

4 stars Broken Barricades, the fifth album of Procol Harum is the one associated most with the playing of Robin Trower. Trower performs and sings on the psychedelic, Song For A Dreamer, a homage to Jimi Hendrix who died only a fortnight after Trower last saw him perform. Robin Trower is often compared to Jimi Hendrix but the comparison is a bit unfair because there can only be one Jimi Hendrix. Song For A Dreamer is a precursor of the style of guitar playing you get on the Trower's Bridge Of Sighs album where Trower strengthens the guitars by adding bass player/singer John Dewar. Song For A Dreamer has all the familiar progressive elements of choruses, guitars that come and go and time changes to some sublime drumming of BJ Wilson. Another hard rocker on the album is Memorial Drive, also sung by Trower, with some superb heavy guitar playing. The album is mixed with a couple of stunning Brooker ballads, Broken Barricades and Luskus Delph. Keith Reid lyrics are a little less literal from the death obsessed lyrics of the Home album but have a certain poetry that suits the album. Simple Sister, the album opener, is much like the rest of the album in featuring less of the usual organ on a Procol Harum album and slipping in the occasional moog synthesizer. It starts off with a heavy guitar riff, rising in pitch to Brooker's voice and more electric guitar until settling into some Boogie Woogie style piano.

Broken Barricades is a hidden gem. It's a shame that Robin Trower didn't continue with Procol Harum, but then we'd be missing out on some great Robin Trower solo albums. BJ Wilson shows here that he is one of the great drummers of his generation. Pity Procol Harum didn't have a stronger bass player. Then we might be comparing them with bands like The Who. After this Gary Brooker started working with orchestras which yielded mixed results. While he continued to improve as a song writer the band loses that hard edge that they had with this album.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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