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OPETH

Tech/Extreme Prog Metal • Sweden


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Opeth biography
Founded in Stockholm, Sweden in 1990

Yes, some people would consider OPETH to be a pure (melodic) Death Metal band but you have to differentiate a lot. The four guys from Stockholm/Sweden feature a lot of different elements on their albums. We have the aggressive death metal with Mikael's growls (which are not generated with help of a computer, it's actually his voice) with lots of breaks, mostly acoustic including Mikael's clear voice. Mr. Åkerfeldt himself always underestimates his clear voice and often points out that he is a novice regarding this kind of singing. But that's not true, false modesty is the term here. His clear voice is warm and simply beautiful. The whole music is guitar orientated, on the one hand we have great riffing for aggressive parts, awesome melodic solos and on the other hand acoustic breaks with admirable melodies with some Scandinavian folk influences here and there and of course Mikael's clear vocals. Sometimes you even get some PINK FLOYD or PORCUPINE TREE like parts or whole songs.

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2014 ⭐

⭐ Collaborators Top Prog Album of 2008 ⭐

Sure, the band started out as a pure Death Metal combo regarding to their first release" "Orchid" but from their second release on the prog elements got more and more. The second album "Morningrise" for example features a pure Prog song with PINK FLOYD like parts as well as epic song lengths. Mikael Åkerfeldt who also is the indispensable head of the band, often mentions that he is a proghead and mostly likes bands like CAMEL and PORCUPINE TREE. No doubt, you can hear those influences on albums like "Still Life" and "Blackwater Park" but their highlight regarding to pure Prog for sure is their 2003 release "Damnation" which features an entire album in the style of PORCUPINE TREE. Not really astonishing regarding the fact that Steven Wilson of PORCUPINE TREE is a good friend of Mikael and Peter and even worked together with the band for their double release "Damnation" and "Deliverance". Steven Wilson also produced their album "Blackwater Park" which is regarded as their best work so far, not only by death metal fans but also by many others normally disliking death metal growls (like me). "Damnation" for sure is the album most of...
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OPETH discography


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OPETH top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.28 | 729 ratings
Orchid
1995
3.73 | 830 ratings
Morningrise
1996
3.97 | 844 ratings
My Arms, Your Hearse
1998
4.28 | 1775 ratings
Still Life
1999
4.26 | 1844 ratings
Blackwater Park
2001
3.80 | 1034 ratings
Deliverance
2002
3.99 | 1406 ratings
Damnation
2003
4.25 | 1720 ratings
Ghost Reveries
2005
4.00 | 1284 ratings
Watershed
2008
3.80 | 1360 ratings
Heritage
2011
4.15 | 1225 ratings
Pale Communion
2014
3.70 | 575 ratings
Sorceress
2016
4.01 | 492 ratings
In Cauda Venenum
2019

OPETH Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.14 | 127 ratings
Lamentations: Live at Shepherd Bush Empire 2003
2006
4.10 | 217 ratings
The Roundhouse Tapes
2007
3.88 | 8 ratings
The Devil's Orchard (Live At Rock Hard Festival 2009)
2011
4.54 | 13 ratings
Lamentations Live At Shepherd's Bush Empire
2016
4.31 | 46 ratings
Garden of the Titans: Live at Red Rocks Amphitheatre
2018

OPETH Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.06 | 228 ratings
Lamentations: Live at Shepherd's Bush
2003
4.11 | 161 ratings
The Roundhouse Tapes
2008
4.66 | 256 ratings
In Live Concert At The Royal Albert Hall
2010
4.35 | 23 ratings
Live at Enmore Theatre Sidney Australia
2011

OPETH Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.56 | 44 ratings
Limited Edition Box Set
2006
4.00 | 72 ratings
The Candlelight Years
2008
4.25 | 4 ratings
The Wooden Box
2009
2.50 | 2 ratings
The Collection
2014
4.09 | 15 ratings
Deliverance & Damnation
2015

OPETH Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.12 | 25 ratings
Apostle in Triumph
1994
4.46 | 50 ratings
The Drapery Falls
2001
4.09 | 37 ratings
Deliverance
2002
4.45 | 56 ratings
Still Day Beneath the Sun 7''
2003
3.17 | 28 ratings
Selections From Ghost Reveries
2005
3.31 | 45 ratings
The Grand Conjuration
2005
4.50 | 10 ratings
Ghost of Perdition
2006
3.02 | 25 ratings
Watershed - Radio Sampler
2008
3.67 | 48 ratings
Porcelain Heart
2008
3.61 | 52 ratings
Mellotron Heart
2008
3.85 | 69 ratings
Burden
2008
4.00 | 3 ratings
Dirge for November - Live
2010
2.88 | 8 ratings
Slither
2011
3.48 | 75 ratings
The Throat of Winter
2011
3.68 | 93 ratings
The Devil's Orchard
2011
3.83 | 12 ratings
Cusp of Eternity
2014
3.30 | 20 ratings
Sorceress
2016
3.07 | 15 ratings
Will o the Wisp
2016
3.07 | 14 ratings
The Wilde Flowers
2016
3.33 | 3 ratings
Book of Opeth
2016
3.28 | 9 ratings
Live in Plovdiv (split with Enslaved)
2017
4.00 | 5 ratings
Ghost of Perdition (Live)
2018
3.94 | 16 ratings
Hjärtat Vet Vad Handen Gör / Heart In Hand
2019
3.77 | 13 ratings
Svekets Prins
2019

OPETH Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Sorceress by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.70 | 575 ratings

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Sorceress
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Sorceress finds Opeth continuing the run of nostalgic prog albums that began with Heritage and continued through Pale Communion. As on those two albums, the band show a keen appreciation of not just the prog rock bands of the past, but also the sounds which were influencing and inspiring those bands.

Pale Communion had its moments where it took on influence from the heavier end of psychedelic rock, and Sorceress finds the band deepening their appreciation of and drawing on the psychedelic sounds which the early prog scene coalesced out of. Indeed, one song is named The Wilde Flowers, after the band which would, post-fracture, spawn Caravan and The Soft Machine, and whilst I wouldn't say the band go full Canterbury here, I would say there's passages on here which aren't entirely incompatible with that.

Other tracks, such as Will O the Wisp, have a folky air to them and a general production approach highly reminiscent of Jethro Tull from the early 1970s, or heavier moments. The band have still more or less exited the metal sphere on this album, but Chrysalis is hard rocking enough to suggest a potential route back, with a pulsing intensity which puts me in mind of Hawkwind.

Whilst many Opeth albums took a while to grow on me, Sorceress gripped me from the start, and I think it's an excellent further improvement of the approach of Heritage and Pale Communion.

 Heritage by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.80 | 1360 ratings

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Heritage
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars In some ways, prog metal stalwarts Opeth putting out an album which is all-prog, no-metal wasn't so unprecedented when Heritage was released. After all, Damnation had come out nearly a decade earlier.

However, come to Heritage expecting Damnation Part 2 - or, for that matter, something sounding anything like Opeth releases past - and you'll find yourself extremely surprised. You see, that Damnation comparison overlooks the fact that Deliverance and Damnation were always meant to be one album, and when they were split in two the harder, heavier, more energetic numbers ended up on Deliverance and the softer, gentler numbers ended up on Damnation, accounting for the sedated, tranquilised feel of that album.

That's not the case here: Heritage has a mixture of gentler numbers and more thunderous ones, that blend being captured by gentle piano intro - the title track, Heritage - which then leads into The Devil's Orchard, one of the more energetic tracks on the album. And it's on Devil's Orchard where you really hear the difference - because it's very much a prog rock track, not a prog metal track.

At most, you might be able to catch a hint of fury in Martin Axenrot's drum work, but even then he's hardly pulling out the blast beats, and the rest of the band really are not playing in a metal mode at all, instead shifting to performances mixing classic prog of the past with more modern takes. Sections of I Feel the Dark take on a very Porcupine Tree- esque sound, perhaps inevitably given Steven Wilson's presence at the mixing desk, whilst the heaviest moments on the album are more reminiscent of, say, Atomic Rooster rather than Black Sabbath (or perhaps, as at the start of Slither, one can detect a shade of Deep Purple).

Naturally, more or less all the vocals are clean, which I feel is the album's weak point - Mikael Åkerfeldt just isn't that exciting of a lead vocalist. Other than this, it's another interesting departure in the Opeth catalogue; I personally enjoy it, but those who only find Opeth interesting when they have at least a pinch of death metal in their formula will likely be disappointed.

 The Candlelight Years by OPETH album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2008
4.00 | 72 ratings

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The Candlelight Years
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This is a convenient way of collecting Opeth's first three albums all in one fell swoop. Though Morningrise is far and away the best album here, the other two albums presented are nice bonuses on top of that star attraction; Orchid captures the band in the process of gradually finding their sound, whilst My Arms, Your Hearse has a bleak, almost black metal-inspired aesthetic which makes it perhaps Opeth's darkest and murkiest release. Each disc has a few bonus tracks, giving a full overview of the band's earliest era, making this a good purchase so long as you're happy with not getting the full artwork.
 Watershed by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2008
4.00 | 1284 ratings

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Watershed
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Opeth's Watershed is aptly titled, because it follows the departure of two long-standing members of the band: Peter Lindgren had been on every Opeth album up to this one, whilst Martin Lopez had provided drumming from My Arms, Your Hearse onwards. New drummer Martin Axenrot had appeared on The Roundhouse Tapes, whilst this would be the first release to feature Fredrik Åkesson on guitar, though he clearly missed no time in gelling with the rest of the group; he even gets a songwriting credit on Porcelain Heart, which is notable given how much of Opeth's material by this point was written solely by Mikael Åkerfeldt.

Still, the bulk of the composition work here is still done by Åkerfeldt, so this is very much an evolution of the Opeth approach rather than a radical shift in it. Nonetheless, there's still original surprises here and there; Nathalie Lorichs provides a haunting guest vocal on album opener Coil, and the addition of classical wind and string instruments adds a certain spice to things. The air of the spookier side of 1970s prog is still present here and there - Per Wiberg breaks out some Mellotron here and there which is outright haunting, and Burden sounds like a mixture of mid-1970s Pink Floyd and King Crimson's Epitaph - whilst the death metal aspects of the band's sound are as frantic and powerful as ever.

Whilst I would not put it in the top tier of the band's output, it's certainly a strong album, and a good start for a new phase in the band's existence.

 In Cauda Venenum by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2019
4.01 | 492 ratings

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In Cauda Venenum
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

5 stars The cd issue I have contains both the Swedish and English sung albums so I spun the English one twice before switching to the Swedish one which I find more to my tastes. I'll still use the English song titles though. How about that art work! Travis Smith has outdone himself. He's worked with OPETH since the 90's and he and Mikael collaborate on it, sharing their ideas. I shared this art with some co-workers warning them that it was a scary picture. Showing them first the cover art and pointing the the pink strip at the bottom and saying that's a tongue. Two jumped back. Opening the gatefold they see this giant demon with his long tongue stuck out carrying the house containing these shadowy figures. One is King Diamond not sure about the rest. As far as the music goes this album has jumped into my top three OPETH records along with "Pale Communion" and "Damnation". They thank ANEKDOTEN for the kind use of their M400 mellotron and we get it on six of the ten tracks.

Talk about mellotron how about the opener "Garden Of Earthly Delights" where we get these heavenly choirs before electronics join in around 1 1/2 minutes. Church bells a minute later so we know we're doomed especially when we start to hear footsteps. A child's voice ends it before we get crushed with "Dignity". Sounds like a song title. Hey that opener is a top five. Mellotron on this second track and some vocal melodies. Nice guitar solo then a calm. It kicks back in heavily but how about that symphonic calm, so beautiful then it's heavy again after 5 minutes. The song ends with a sample of multiple people laughing hysterically.

I like "Heart In Hand" for it's energy and how about that screaming guitar. Just a beast but then the last couple of minutes feature this beautiful calm with reserved vocals. "Next Of Kin" sort of plods along but it sounds really cool late with those strings produced and arranged by Dave Stewart but written by Akerfeldt. "Lovelorn Crime" is one I really connect with and a top five. Quite moving at times with plenty of piano. It does kick in dramatically as contrasts continue. How good is this 2 minutes in. Come on!

"Charlatan" is a top five as well for the mellotron and power. Lots of depth here and energy. Love the nasty keys too. Some samples of people saying things and I love that chorus. Another top five is "Universal Truth" and man this might be my second favourite after the opener. Just the contrasts alone blow me away. The only section on the whole album that I'm not big on is the opening on "Continuum" but this is a song that gets better as it plays out. The closer is my final top five and what a song! "All Things Will Pass" has it all, the mellotron the great sounding heavy sections, trippy stuff, and man so uplifting after 6 1/2 minutes, I think I have something in my eye.

Congrats Mikael and the band for still bringing it. Without question one of my favourites from 2019. This is the album where Akerfeldt's favourite band CAMEL gets the most nods in my opinion. They really are a Heavy Prog band now.

 Still Life by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 1999
4.28 | 1775 ratings

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Still Life
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Fourth Opeth album which, according to the Progarchives Top 100 of all time, should be their masterpiece.

1. The Moor (11:28). Mini suite with heavy metal rhythm, Akerfeldt's death metal growl and Peter Lindgren's guitar chase each other for a long time, alternating different atmospheres: the best are the instrumental acoustic one of the incipit, and the semi-acoustic one that arrives at around 7-8 minutes (sung with the normal voice). The death metal parts are bad, like the final one, where the death metal growl returns which to my ears is somewhat kitsch. Rating 7+.

2. Godhead's Lament (9:47) Accelerated and overloaded death metal start, then progression to an acoustic phase, almost a rock ballad, then the excited death metal phase returns. Weak song. Rating 5.75.

3. Benighted (5:01) Slow guitar ballad, almost entirely instrumental, which comes alive only in the final but which overall sounds subdued and monotonous. Sweetness is appreciated. Rating 6.5.

4. Moonlapse Vertigo (9:00) Third mini-suite that alternates grotesque atmospheres with clear parts, heterogeneous and unequal song both in singing and in music. Rating 6.5.

5. Face of Melinda (7:59). It may be the only really beautiful and meaningful song of the Lp, able to go from acoustic ballad to heavy metal without forcing and without the kitsch of death metal singing. Not a masterpiece, but beautiful. Rating 8.

6. Death painted with serenity (9:14). Another minisuite that alternates slow acoustic parts, classic rock parts and death metal parts, insisting (too much) in the changes of rhythm and atmosphere. Overall, however, an appreciable result. Rating 7.

7. White cluster (10:02). Final mini-suite, perhaps the most proggy song on the album, which after a bad start in death metal gains quality over time with pause, acceleration and even melody. Rating 7.75

Total time 62:31

Overall, according to the canons of its genre, Still Life is, in my opinion, a good album which, however, does not achieve the objectives of its ambition; the songs are almost all decent, with no real peaks but overall without serious drops. Final rating 7+. Three stars.

 Damnation by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.99 | 1406 ratings

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Damnation
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by DangHeck

4 stars Opeth's seventh studio album Damnation (2003) is not only significant merely in its more acoustic tone nor in Mikael Åkerfeldt's purely clean vocals. But its significance is most found in that solely these elements were released in the midst of very likely Opeth's peak popularity as well as their most notable, signature-style Progressive Death Metal era (from Still Life to Watershed, 1999-2008). [Before this era, they mixed Progressive Rock and Folk with an overlaying, predominant Black and Death Metal; Hereafter, they almost entirely sheared off any Metal elements in favor of a cleaner, more classic-Prog-inspired Rock, much to the oft-continued chagrin of many a listener.] This all places Damnation at a vital point in the band's history and as a still-relevant and interesting creative work. Recorded the same time as Deliverance (2002), but released after, it is viewed often as its sister-album, especially given Opeth's initial intent to release them together as a double album. As such, this is the last in a series of three albums co- produced with Porcupine Tree's Steven Wilson (the other one being the much-beloved Blackwater Park, 2001). Wilson, I feel certain, was a nudging force for the band toward a more distinctly classic Prog sound; I'm sure he nor much of anyone else outside the band was pushing them away from metal, and I would say that, even now, they still have Metal elements throughout their music. In addition to co-production, Steven Wilson played keyboards, including piano and most significantly mellotron, as well as very recognizable backing vocals.

"Windowpane" starts the album with a killer riff over rolling bass and grooving drums. Very memorable melody, this is one of the great Opeth classics to me. "In My Time of Need" is very straightforward. Very light, but consisting of an ever-present mellotron. "Death Whispered a Lullaby" has another very familiar, classic Åkerfeldt melody and is driven by a simple acoustic guitar arpeggio. Very solid song. Next, "Closure" has another super strong melody (lovely harmonies, too). In the midsection, the rhythm shifts to a sort of Eastern thing. Shoutout to the great Martin Lopez for really holding this together.

All falls away to the soft, reflective "Hope Leaves". Super straight, but pretty. Then it's "To Rid the Disease", with a bit more compositional interest and a whole lot more mellotron (and piano). Rolling in instrumental is the ironically not closer, "Ending Credits", with a super nice, very sweet guitar melody (very familiar, as though it's from something else); maybe like Camel? Finally finally we have "Weakness". This is a very minimal, but haunting number. I'm not into it so much, but it does have a certain something. I feel that this song specifically is a very clear foreshadowing to Åkerfeldt and Wilson's project, Storm Corrosion, its sole album released 2012. Interesting, fairly effective closer to a very [I mean "more"] interesting and, in a lot of ways, lasting work of art. It's certainly unique in their discography.

Rounded up from a True Rate of 3.75/5.00.

 Deliverance by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.80 | 1034 ratings

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Deliverance
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Infamously, this was meant to be a double album with Damnation, which had all the quieter songs on it, but the record label wouldn't give them time to finish it properly. This does mean that as the album feels a little unbalanced - it's got more emphasis on the heavier side of Opeth's sound than Blackwater Park or Still Life did, and that wasn't intentional and can get slightly wearing, but on the whole it's still solid enough. By and large we're still in unambiguously prog metal realms, though Master's Apprentice is perhaps the most emphatic return of Opeth's death metal roots we'd been treated to since, say, My Arms, Your Hearse, or perhaps the harshest moments on Still Life.

It certainly shows the scars of its turbulent genesis, so I wouldn't put Deliverance on the level of Still Live or Blackwater Park; at the time of its release it was probably their weakest album since My Arms, Your Hearse. But hey, that was a pretty solid album - and so is this.

 My Arms, Your Hearse by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 1998
3.97 | 844 ratings

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My Arms, Your Hearse
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by dougmcauliffe

5 stars I wanted to take this chance to write about my favorite album of all time: My Arms Your Hearse by Opeth. The title derives from a lyric from an obscure psychedelic folk album from the 70's called First Utterance by Comus. In a complete terrifying abyss of a song called 'Drip Drip,' the vocalist utters the line 'As I carry you to your grave, my arms your hearse.' This album came out in 1998 and it's in the genre of progressive death metal. This style of music certainly isn't for everyone, and it's not necessarily even going to be an easy listen for those who already have a foot in the door with the genre. But I have a vast interest in extreme and abstract forms of music, and I think the harsh vocals you find in this style of music can be best summarized with this analogy. If you want to make a guitar sound heavier, you add distortion to it. I see harsh vocals as the vocal equivalent of distorting a guitar to make it sound heavier and give it some dirty grit. The goal of the genre is to simply make the most evil sounding music that one can conjure up, and I think they reliably achieve this. What I love most about Opeth is that the vocalist uses his entire range and will often alternate between these guttural, inhuman sounding growls, and very melodic and emotive sounding clean vocals. It's this stark contrast in their music that really draws me in and paints a vivid auditory picture. My Arms Your Hearse is a concept album, many of the tracks segue directly into one another and the last lyric of every song is the title of the following song. The recording quality can be a little muddy and it doesn't render the most clarity. But I think these imperfections give the album some character and texture, the sound is very full considering the resources they had at their disposal.

The album opens with 'Prologue' which is supposed to represent the main character's death. It's a short ambient introductory track that's just simple bittersweet piano chords and rain sounds. 'April Ethereal' is an emotional goliath of a song with high peaks and valleys throughout. This song recounts the man's ghost returning home to visit his widowed wife and being enraged to find that upon his return, there's another man in the house comforting her. The very first lyrics spoken on the album describe this scene 'it was me peering through the looking glass.' She looks at him, but looks right through him, unaware of his presence. In the following song 'When,' he realizes the bond between him and his former lover is fractured, in the final stretch of the song he is stricken by grief from this discovery. So in his anguish, he makes his presence known to the two, this is 'The Amen Corner.' In this song, he says to her 'And even though you believe that I am shackled within death, memories are tainted with paleness.' This is expanded upon in the next song: 'Demon of the Fall,' where he haunts and terrorizes her until they eventually meet face to face and he comes to the humiliating realization that she isn't in love with him anymore. In the final passage of this song, the main character talks about fleeing from this inconceivable realization, ending on the line 'Just one second, and I was left with nothing' that day came to an end, and she had lost me in her credence.' Not only do I see this track as a lyrical high point of the album, but I also see it as a masterful display of songwriting. The ending of this song is only more enhanced by how relentless and agressive the first half is in contrast to the hopeless fleeting closing minutes.

The following song 'Credence,' features only clean vocals, and it's probably the most intimate sounding track on the album. The man realizes how blinded by rage he was in the preceding song while lurking around within the shadows of his former home. He's overcome with feelings of guilt as he slowly comes to terms with the fact that he has no chance of reclaiming her love. In the final lyrical song of the album 'Karma,' the man returns to the forest and accepts his death, realizing the living world has nothing more for him. The imagery in this song is incredibly lucid and graphic as it describes his entire world freezing over into a barren wasteland devoid of any life or substance. The final words on this album are: 'draped within a fate I could not change, and always welcoming winter's epilogue.' That brings the listener into the final minutes of the album in the aptly titled 'Epilogue.' It's a heart wrenching instrumental that properly sets the despairing scene as the main character experiences somewhat of a second death, but I suppose this time with all his loose ends tied up.

This album takes you to a very dark place, and the way it's cohesively strung together really blows me away. It punches me straight in the gut without failure every time I hear it, but there's even more subtle symbolism to it. You see, the main character goes through the classic five stages of grief, and there's an emphasis on the passage of time throughout the album and the healing and clarity that comes from such. The four seasons are mentioned throughout the lyrics of some of the key songs. April Ethereal represents the spring, the Amen Corner is summer, Demon of the Fall is Autumn, and Karma is the winter which closes the season cycle and also happens to be the point in the story where the man puts himself to rest. My Arms Your Hearse is the story of a man grappling with his understandings and misunderstandings, and feeling like it's him against the world. But truly, there's nothing for the living to be against. These are just a handful of the reasons why this is my favorite album ever made.

 Blackwater Park by OPETH album cover Studio Album, 2001
4.26 | 1844 ratings

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Blackwater Park
Opeth Tech/Extreme Prog Metal

Review by Nhelv

4 stars I must say I definitely respect this album for what it is. While it isn't really a flawless essential masterpiece of melodic death metal it for sure provides with some high-quality music that remains through most of the album.

The album is quite lengthy and has some 10-Minute mammoths inside, so you can expect very progressive songs and dynamic. Songs constantly alternate between death metal and melodic passages, keeping this album from being monotonous. Some clear examples of this would be the Opener, Bleak and The Drapery Falls. These tracks, like the rest of the album, are very good and enjoyable (if you like growls, that is).

A downside in this album is that some tracks definitely feel overextended. Dirge For November being the prime example of this. It showcases its main idea and repeats it all the way through, same with Harvest. Finally, this record can definitely sound horrible to most progressive rock fans, although they should still give it a try.

It's gonna be four stars, very good record but wouldn't call it essential.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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