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TUSMØRKE

Prog Folk • Norway


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Tusmørke picture
Tusmørke biography
Founded in Skien, Telemark, Norway in 1994 (until 2009 as "Les Fleurs du Mal")

Norway's TUSMØRKE (Norwegian for twilight) go straight to the heart of the psychedelic matter on their full-length debut album 'Underjordisk Tusmørke' (Subterranean Twilight). Culling influences from such prog-psych luminaries as GONG and CARAVAN, Krautrock giants like CAN and AMON DÜUL 2, acid-leaning folksters like The INCREDIBLE STRING BAND as well as a healthy dose of Nordic folk music, TUSMØRKE present a dark cauldron of magical, musical potions.

The band's history dates to the mid-nineties and a budding Scandinavian scene of new progressive bands. The Momrak twins, who would become the core of TUSMØRKE, called their band LES FLEURS DE MAL. That group included future WOBBLER vocalist Andreas Prestmo and shared the stage with other up-and-coming bands such as WHITE WILLOW. Eventually the collective morphed into TUSMØRKE, whose music is darker, more intense and even primeval than their more delicate predecessor.

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TUSMØRKE discography


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TUSMØRKE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.78 | 47 ratings
Underjordisk Tusmørke
2012
3.79 | 28 ratings
Riset Bak Speilet
2014
3.88 | 41 ratings
Ført Bak Lyset
2016
3.79 | 20 ratings
Hinsides
2017
3.83 | 15 ratings
Bydyra
2017
4.37 | 11 ratings
Fjernsyn I Farver
2018
4.00 | 3 ratings
Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~
2018

TUSMØRKE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

TUSMØRKE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

TUSMØRKE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

TUSMØRKE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 3 ratings
Salmonsens Hage / Singers & Swallows
2012
3.31 | 7 ratings
Den Internasjonale Bronsealderen
2013
5.00 | 4 ratings
Offerpresten
2013

TUSMØRKE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~ by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.00 | 3 ratings

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Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Antonis Kalamoutsos

4 stars One can't expect ordinary things from a far-from-ordinary band as Norway's Tusmorke. The fact that is the second album they release in the same year and, mostly, that Osloborgerlig Tusmorke: Vardoger og Utburder Volume 1 is consisted of 'curios', demos, outtakes and songs that weren't qualified for previous ones, would be more than enough to not anticipate a remarkable outcome. Let's be honest, albums of previously 'unwanted' material usually address to diehard fans only. Surprisingly, Tusmorke took a very special care of this material in order to present a solid and coherent album and they succeeded this beyond any doubt.

The first way to achieve this was by creating a conceptual basis for all the songs. As a result, this is a loose but a real concept album, one that explores the history and myths of the beautiful city of Oslo. It's a simple but very clever way to thematically unify songs that could otherwise be unrelated. This idea is especially assisted by Tusmorke' s musical style which actually reminds or remains strongly bonded with the notion of an undefined past.

Respectively, their musical approach furthermore projects that eerie and elusive sense of times bygone. There are no new elements added to their established progressive folk style but this album's perspective seems to be focusing slightly more to the folky angle of their music. For example, only 3 tracks feature standard drums while the majority is based on percussion. There are very few distorted keyboards and as a result, minimum electric guitar imitation (which is something like a trademark for the band) and the whole vibes are more laid back, colourful, cheerful even in cases like ''Djeveren fra Oslo''. It seems that some of the darker sides of Tusmorke were left behind for this album but that feeling of magic and mystery remained intact.

The vibes from Tusmorke' s music is always eccentric albeit their songwriting feels normal and solid. Their eccentricity lies in the fact that, unlike many other 70s-inspired bands, Tusmorke don't sound like reproducing or copying sounds they love. There is truly something timeless that follows them instead, the collective energy of a band that convinces the listener they are trapped in a timespace of their own, like a mythical psych/prog/folk rock of an alternative reality. Tusmorke would be equally 'outsiders of great value' 40 years ago as they are in the present.

The quintessence of Osloborgerlig Tusmorke: Vardoger og Utburder Volume 1 hides in its wonderful arrangements. As already said, the compositions are melody-oriented and they hold no surprises, twists or turns. They invest on the sonic warmth instead, with excellent use of keyboards (with some of the best key instruments of all time as always) and especially wind instruments. And while the flute is a protagonist throughout the album, it's the marvelous voice of the clarinets that steals the show. The 11 minutes of the final track ''Gamle Aker Kirke'' prove my claim, in a composition that has to be considered the album's highlight.

A truly unexpected album, as the odds seemed to be against it, Osloborgerlig Tusmorke: Vardoger og Utburder Volume 1 showcases once more that Tusmorke is one of those bands which, while bringing nothing new to prog music, carry a very strong personality instead. The listener can be convinced and this is what actually matters. And as Oslo waits the travelers to solve its riddle, a riddle formed among drakkars, modern architecture, fancy clubs and gloomy gothic cathedrals, Tusmorke just add to the mystery. They add that distant echo that comes from somewhere deep in Oslo's woods, wherever these might be.

 Fjernsyn I Farver by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.37 | 11 ratings

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Fjernsyn I Farver
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Norwegian band TUSMORKE was formed back in the middle of the 1990's, but didn't actually become recording artists until 2012. Since then the band have grown considerably in status and stature, with half a dozen albums to their name at this point. "Fjernsyn i Farver" is their most recent studio album, and was released by Norwegian label Karisma Records in the spring of 2018.

While "Fjernsyn i Farver" doesn't strike me as the most obvious buy for those with a fascination for the folkier landscapes of the progressive rock universe, this is an album featuring details that crowd would enjoy and to some extent this aspect of the band is one you need to enjoy, just like the striking vocals. But as far as I'm concerned, this is a production that by and large should find most favor among those who find bands such as Atomic Rooster and Black Widow to be compelling. For people with that leaning, that haven't come across Tusmorke yet, this production may well feel like a revelation when uncovered.

 Bydyra by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.83 | 15 ratings

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Bydyra
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Norwegian band TUSMORKE was formed back in the middle of the 1990's, but didn't actually become recording artists until 2012. Since then the band have grown considerably in status and stature, with half a dozen albums to their name at this point. "Bydyra" is their fifth studio album, and was released by Norwegian label Karisma Records towards the end if 2017.

Music made for children are one of those details of life that can give some people headaches merely by mentioning it. Car vacations with the same album of simplistic, limited musical dandruff repeated over and over again a real life nightmare I imagine a few are still familiar with, even if this is mainly an experience from a bygone age by now. Tusmorke proves quite nicely that music of this kind doesn't have to be as limited as certain international corporations wants us to believe, and that music of this kind can be an interesting listen also for adults. Primarily one for the children this one, but also an album that prog loving parents can safely play in their car or at home without being in danger of getting a migraine. As far as style is concerned, this is progressive folk rock blended with a children's musical. A blend that is rather more appealing than what you would expect.

 Underjordisk Tusmørke by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.78 | 47 ratings

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Underjordisk Tusmørke
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This was the debut for this Norwegian band released in 2012. Quite a vocal dominated affair really but with some killer instrumental work throughout. If it wasn't so heavy on the vocals I would be considering a higher rating. Still I went from being kind of amused with what I heard after the first couple of listens to not being able to wait to play this album once again. Very melodic and catchy throughout. This band formed from the ashes of LES FLEURS DU MAL who never released an album but we do get a 17 1/2 minute bonus track by them that is the best song on this recording and it doesn't sound much like the same band as we get Andreas the current vocalist for WOBBLER singing and a much more Swedish sound in my opinion with the mellotron, guitar, upfront bass and melancholic sound. I agree with Andy from Planet Mellotron that this bonus track is almost worth the price of admission alone.

I don't usually even comment on bonus tracks unless they are exceptional and there's another one by TUSMORKE called "Singers & Swallows" that would be second favourite track on here, go figure. The main album features plenty of vintage keyboard work from WOBBLER's own Lars Fredrik Froislie as he brings in mellotron, spinet, chamberlin, clavinet, organ, synths, glockenspiel, musical box and the kitchen sink. He also produced and recorded it. Again the main album has lots of vocals, harmonies and catchy choruses which usually isn't my thing but I was won over fairly quickly. The album's title means "Subterranean Twilight" and this is a mellotron album for sure.

"Fimbul" is catchy with flute over top then the vocals join in. Shades of mellotron and chamberlin too along with synths. I like when it calms down after 2 minutes with mellotron, bass then flute. Reserved vocals join in along with keys. It all kicks back in around 3 1/2 minutes. Another calm with vocal melodies after 4 1/2 minutes which sounds really good.

"Watching The Moon Fall Out Of The East" has this excellent melancholic intro with flute, mellotron and more as these relaxed vocals join in. This is a top four track for me. Reminds me of SINKADUS and ANGLAGARD actually during the more laid back sections. Love when it picks up as well 4 minutes in especially that rickenbacker bass. We get flute, guitar, drums and more. It picks up even more late with vocals and vocal melodies. What a song!

"The Quintessence Of Elements" has melancholic flute to start as bass, drums and more take over with vocals. Catchy and melodic and we get organ on the chorus. A beautiful instrumental section starts after 2 minutes then it picks up before the vocals return. "Young Man & His Woman" is very uptempo and vocal led with plenty of flute and organ. I like when it settles down after a minute without vocals. It kicks back in and we get vocal melodies here and some passion in those vocals too. Themes are repeated.

"A Nightmare's Just A Dream" is laid back to start with flute, prominent bass and a beat as the vocals join in. It turns fuller a minute in, in fact it gets quite intense really. It settles again as contrasts continue. Check out the mellotron before 2 1/2 minutes and that incredible section starting before 6 minutes instrumentally. Love that bass!

"Hostjevndogn" features vocals in their native language and this is a top four song for me as well. It's more relaxed with drums and flute standing out to start then reserved vocals join in. Man that instrumental section sounds so good beginning 3 minutes in and ending around 4 1/2 minutes. This song reminds me of SINKADUS. "Singers & Swallows" one of the three bonus tracks is a top four. A chilled tune really with flute, a beat, upfront bass and more. Such a beautiful track. Some nice vocal melodies along with mellotron too.

"Ode On Dawn" is a classic and as I said in the intro I want more! Hopefully there is more archival material from this early incarnation of the band under the name LES FLEURS DU MAL. The percussion gallops along early on with the sound of wind as the flute arrives. The percussion ends but not the wind or flute. Vocals from Andreas before 1 1/2 minutes along with mellotron, bass, guitar and some brief spoken words. Flute, a beat and mellotron kick in too and what a great sound as it builds with that in your face bass. Vocals are back 5 minutes in as it settles with lots of mellotron and bass. A calm with wind before 7 1/2 minutes as the drums and bass build. Guitar joins in along with flute. So good! Vocals are back before 13 minutes but again like the first two times they don't last long as the guitar, bass and drums lead. So Swedish sounding with that mellotron. The percussion gallops away to end this stone cold classic.

So not counting the bonus tracks a solid 4 stars and an enjoyable release.

 Fjernsyn I Farver by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2018
4.37 | 11 ratings

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Fjernsyn I Farver
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Yet only another six month wait for a new Tusmørke release, right on the heels of the children's prog album Bydyra and is the logical followup to Hinsides as it's back to an adult approach. Children's chorus gone, so are the badger, squirrel and crow costumes back to their usual robes. The lineup is the same as usual, Benediktator (Benedikt Momrak), brother Krizla (Kristoffer Momrak), the Phenomenon Marxo Solinas (Lars Frederik Frøislie) and HlewagastiR (Martin Nordrum Kneppen). Håkon Oftung (Dauinghorn av Jordsjø, Jordsjø a wonderful prog rock band headed by him) was not part of this so it's back a guitarless format. What sounds like a guitar is a heavily fuzzed Hammond organ from Lars or heavily fuzzed bass from Benedikt. Anyways, Fjernsyn I Farver (Color Television) was released on Karisma as was Bydyra, and it's such a drastic departure from Bydyra, but not that drastic from their usual stuff. This is perhaps their most aggressive album, almost like a polar opposite of the partially lightweight Hinsides with only "Borgerlig Tussmørke" the only ballad on the album, and it really has a more symphonic prog feel to it, rather than the lullaby feel of Hinsides. The title track is a wonderful opener, with aggressive fuzzed organ but I really love how it goes into a beautiful flute passage. "Kniven I Kurven" had that wonderful Nordic feel but keeps up with that harder edged approach of this album. "3001" and "Death Czar" almost borders on hard rock, while "Tøyens Hemmelighet" goes off with a bang, more in tune with the first couple of pieces although I wonder what was up with that disco hi hat Martin uses here (he did something similar on Ført Bak Lyset). Martin must at least like some disco to include a little disco beats in a Tusmørke album but do it in a way not to offend progheads.

To me I really think this is their finest album since Underjordisk Tusmørke, if not their finest. Sure the vocals of Benediktator may not be too everyone's liking and I'm sure it's his vocals the major indicator if you'll enjoy Tusmørke or not. Regardless so happy to own this album, although the inner gatefold of the LP is in bad taste. Still the music blew me away and with getting.

 Hinsides by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.79 | 20 ratings

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Hinsides
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

4 stars What's up with Tusmørke? While Wobbler makes us wait for years for a brand new release, Tusmørke rarely keeps us waiting for more than two years for a new release. This time around, about a year since the last release Ført Bak Liset. Hinsides is the first of two albums they released in 2017, the other the unusual children's album Bydyra released in November. Hinsides is probably their most complex and ambitious album they have done so far. The lineup is pretty much the same as before: Krizla, Benediktator (the Momrak brothers who founded Tusmørke), HlewagastiR (Martin Nordrum Kneppen, the drummer for Wobbler), and The Phenomenon Marxo Solinas (Lars Fredrik Frøislie, also of Wobbler, as well as White Willow and others). It might not start that way, "Hjemsøkte Hjem" starts off rather lightweight and upbeat, in fact rather lightweight by Tusmørke standards, but still a great piece. "I Feel Like Midnight" is more heavy, but they unexpectedly break into Latin music, before returning back to their more typical sound. "En Rykende Ruin" is shows a more complex part of the band, but it unexpectedly ends up more lightweight. "Lysskydrøm" has a more lullaby feel to it, it has a familiar sounding melody like I've heard it somewhere else. At first I didn't care for it, but it started to grow on me. It was only because I wasn't used to this group doing such a lightweight piece as this. The piece suddenly breaks into a bit jazzy piece, closing it off with a krumhorn. But then they do something far more doomy and gloomy sounding with the 23 minute "Sankt Sebastians Alter". This is truly amazing and really weird piece, by far the most complex and ambition piece these guys have ever done. This really blew me away and worth the price of admission. With Hinsides I notice the band covering new ground but continuing to retain that wonderful prog/folk/psych feel. I took me a little to get use to the more lightweight parts of this album, but they deliver another goodie worth having!
 Bydyra by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.83 | 15 ratings

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Bydyra
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I wasn't expecting Tusmørke to cough up two albums in one year, but they did, starting with Hinsides in May 2017, and now Bydyra in November. Here they switched labels from Svart to Karisma Records, same label that issued Wobbler's new release From Silence to Somewhere and upcoming releases from Jordsjø, Lars Fredrik Frøslie, credited as The Phenomenon Marxo Solinas provides some great use of Moog and Mellotron, so now children get treated with sounds of such instruments. The group now includes Håkon Oftung from Jordsjø, I guess I can't be too surprised as I get reminded of Tusmørke from time to time with Jordsjø¸ (as well as Wobbler and Änglagård). When I heard Bydyra was going to be a children's album I was suspicious. Here in America (where I live) children's music conjures up images of insipid music from Disney and Barney the Dinosaur. Tusmørke totally avoids that trap big time by creating an honest to god children's prog album! No reminders of Disney, Barney or Elmo here, but instead the lyrics seem to be about urban life, rising housing prices in already expensive Oslo (something that also concerns people in London and Paris, and here in the States with New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Honolulu, with smaller cities like Portland and Seattle heading that way), and apparently magic. The band included a children's chorus from some Oslo primary school. Despite the child-like approach, it's easy to see this is basically the same group that brought us Underjordisk Tusmørke exactly five years before, just you hear children singing along with the Tusmørke guys (Benediktator and Krizla share vocal duties). That's an ingenious way to introduce children to prog. The songs are all short, since I doubt children will be ready for Tales From Topographic Oceans at that age. But that totally makes since and they didn't sacrifice prog just because the songs are shorter. The folk elements are still present as before.

It's safe to say American children won't get much out of it since it's all sung in Norwegian, but for those who wonder if a children's prog album can succeed, I'm happy to say, it succeeds here. No Barney, Elmo or Disney stuff here. I've heard my share of American children's music which pretty much scarred me for life (I'm only glad I was born in 1972, Barney was way after my time). Doing a children's album is certainly a very risky gamble, and in this case it paid off well. Well worth listening to, even if you can't get much out of what they're singing due to language barrier. By far the best children's music album by a country mile!

 Ført Bak Lyset by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.88 | 41 ratings

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Ført Bak Lyset
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Third full album from Tusmørke and it's a great on. Their previous album Riset Bak Spielet featured some great material, but it got bogged down with "Black Swift" and "All is Lost" (in fact the CD bonus cuts were much better), songs that were a tad repetitive and going on too long, especially "Black Swift", easily my least favorite from these guys. I wondered if the band had some writer's block at the time, but I'm glad they seemed to have that problem solved, as their next album totally proves that. Ført Bak Lyset fixed whatever flaws on their predecessor, and make it their best since their debut Underjordisk Tusmørke. Here they sing all in their native Norwegian. Marxo Solinas aka Lars Fredrik Frøislie brings his analog gears, even the occasional Chamberlin and Mellotron. Also it took me this many years to realize drummer HlewagastiR was none other than Martin Nordrum Kneppen who I already know from Wobbler. Also I now know that flautist Krizla is Kristoffer Momrak, and Benediktator is his brother Benedikt Momrak, who plays bass, and both sing (the Momrak brothers are pretty much Tusmørke). There is less reminders of Jethro Tull this time around, but the flute is still present. I really got a kick off "Ekebergkongen" where the flute quotes Edvard Grieg's "In the Hall of the Mountain King". I knew their music frequently got me thinking of Grieg, this time they actually quote Grieg. Helps that "Ekebergkong" translates something like "The King of Ekeberg" (Ekeberg is a neighborhood in Oslo, so obviously these guys aren't taking themselves too seriously). It seems the lyrics talk of changelings and trolls lurking about Ekeberg, which is an upscale neighborhood (perhaps the Tusmørke guys felt the yuppies that live there need to be scared by trolls and changelings). I guess if Henrik Ibsen came up with the idea of Mountain King lurking in Dovrefjell (in which Grieg set to music), the band thought of a King lurking about in Ekeberg, like an urban counterpart to the old Mountain King. The music still has that wonderful mystic fairytale vibe with a Nordic feel to it. Some other goodies I really enjoy here include "Et Djevelsk Mareritt", "Spurvehauken", and "Vinterblot". It's a bit strange to hear Martin Nordrum Kneppen incorporating disco-type hi-hats in "Vinterblot", but other than that it's still a wonderful piece of psych/prog/folk. "Spurvehauken" is a nice piano-dominated piece, while "De Reiser Fra Oss" has a bit of an ELP thing going on in the organ department. I still have trouble understanding the Canterbury and Krautrock acts these guys were frequently compared to, to me they're basically a psychedelic band that incorporates folk and prog elements, but comparing them to Can or Amon Duul II, that I don't understand. Maybe a bit of Caravan had they been Nordic (the vocals sound a tad like a Scandinavian Richard Sinclair). Jethro Tull and Black Widow I understand more clearly.

I also really get a kick off the cover, a toad eating pills, probably uppers or downers (now I think of it, probably quaaludes). The LP gatefold also depicts lizards and snakes also taking those pills in the gatefold and back cover (same probably applies to the CD as well), and a book by Andrew Tomas called Beyond the Time Barrier (1974), which depicts the real book with the real cover. Plus also a Bill Graham Jefferson Airplane poster. Another example of the band not taking themselves always serious.

I am so glad this music exists in 2016, and it's probably destined to me one of my favorites this year. And now in 2018 the album even sounds better than I remembered when I first heard it in '16! This is something I can highly recommend.

 Riset Bak Speilet by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.79 | 28 ratings

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Riset Bak Speilet
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Riset Bak Speilet is the second album by this Norwegian band. Keyboardist Deadly Nightshade had departed, in comes Marxo Solinas who is none other than Lars Fredrik Frøisle, who already appeared as a guest on their previous album, now a full-time member. In my opinion, this followup LP just doesn't reach the greatness of Underjordisk Tusmørke. "Black Swift" and "All is Lost" tend to be repetitive and I don't find them particularly engaging, this would have made a hellva better disc if those two songs were replaced by the bonus cuts. But the other three on the LP is much better. "Offerpresten" is a wonderful, a bit like how Jethro Tull might end up like had they been Nordic. There's also an amusing quote from Black Widow's "Come to the Sabbat". "Gamle Aker Kirke" is another great piece, more mellow, almost like a Nordic Moody Blues. Lars Fredrik Frøisle providing some nice Mellotron and Chamberlin. Then the lengthiest piece, which is the title track where they go full-on progressive rock, showing this band can still make great music even at this length. So this is a case of two brilliant numbers, two mediocre numbers, and another brilliant closer. As for the bonus cuts (available on the CD version, or you can download them when you buy the LP), they rival the LP itself. "Kairo" unsurprisingly has a Middle Eastern feel to it. "Mener Vi Alvor Nå?" is a very strongly medievel piece, in fact you might think this actually dates from the Middle Ages. I love this piece. Then out of nowhere Lars provides some strange synths. Then there's "En Verden Av i Går" is another great proggy piece that I wished was included on the LP proper than "Black Swift". If that was included on the LP, my rating would be higher. Worth owning for the brilliant material present, but also includes some mediocre stuff.
 Underjordisk Tusmørke by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.78 | 47 ratings

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Underjordisk Tusmørke
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars The roots of this odd Norwegian band can be traced back in 1994 in Skien, evolving from the Psych outfit Captain Cumulonimbus and his Wondrous Cloudship, where Benedikt Momrak and Krizla played together.Tusmorke started as a Medieval Folk acoustic trio, developing into Electric Tusmorke in 1996 with the addition of future Wobbler member Andreas Prestmo on bass and into Les Fleurs Du Mal in 1997.After a short history full of live shows and a demo they split up with Benedikt Momrak and Krizla returning to their studies.More than ten years later the duo met with drummer HlewagastiR and Wobbler's Lars Fredrik Froislie and decided to rebirth Tumorske.Initially with Svenno on percussion and Reggie on keyboards, both replaced later by keyboardist Deadly Nightshade, they recorded their debut ''Underjordisk tusmorke'' at LFF Studio in Honefos at the fall of 2011, guided by the experience and instrumental help of Froislie.The album was released in November 2012 on Termo Records both in CD and vinyl format.

Tusmorke started basically as a Retro/Prog Folk band with strong references to the sound of the energetic side of JETHRO TULL, where Medieval rock experimentations met with Heavy Rock pounding and dark, psychedelic tunes.Lots of driving flute parts, psych-spiced guitars and rhythmic vocals with an IAN ANDERSON vibe complete a vintage-styled approach, backed up by a consistent rhythm section.Music performed under groovy flute-led ideas and tight executions.But the Norwegians offer more than this.They incorporated the sound of Mellotron deep into their sound and they even added some synths, electric piano and harsichord in moments to deliver extremely rich and semi-personal Folk Rock, only comparable with WHITE WILLOW.The vocal arrangements are excellent and the instrumental moves are played with passion and dynamics, while the combination of folky soundscapes with the sharp edges of Heavy/Psychedelic Rock is quite interesting and even genuine, especially when the Mellotron washes come in evidence.

While the LP issue is great and definitely interesting for all vinyl collectors, the CD contains a bonus of three stunning tracks.The first two were issued in 2011 as a 7'' vinyl by Fresh Tea in only 200 copies, featuring incredible Scandinavian Heavy/Folk Rock with both English and Norwegian lyrics and an absolutely original mix of flute-powered Prog Rock with Mellotron, strings and synthesizers, creating a very dramatic enviroment.But the most surprising piece comes from the 17-min. ''Ode on dawn'', released as a demo back in 1997 by Les Fleurs Du Mal, a great Scandinavian Prog Rock epic with a dramatic tone, not dissimilar to ANEKDOTEN, MORTE MACABRE or LANDBERK, with less pronounced flute work and more evident symhponic tendencies due to the omnipresent Mellotron and the definite KING CRIMSON influence in the guitar workouts.Nice and lengthy piece with melodramatic vocals and extremely powerful bass work.

The vinyl issue of ''Underjordisk tusmorke'' is respectable and partially inventive Heavy/Folk Rock with tight songwriting, retro nuances and an impressive level of energy, coming along the lines of JETHRO TULL and WHITE WILLOW, the CD offering is simply more than this, a documentary of Tusmorke's history with a more varied sound on ''Ode on dawn'' and a pair of stunning extra pieces.No matter which one you select, this debut by the Norwegians hippies is strongly recommended...3.5 stars.

Thanks to [email protected] for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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