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TUSMØRKE

Prog Folk • Norway


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Tusmørke picture
Tusmørke biography
Founded in Skien, Telemark, Norway in 1994 (until 2009 as "Les Fleurs du Mal")

Norway's TUSMØRKE (Norwegian for twilight) go straight to the heart of the psychedelic matter on their full-length debut album 'Underjordisk Tusmørke' (Subterranean Twilight). Culling influences from such prog-psych luminaries as GONG and CARAVAN, Krautrock giants like CAN and AMON DÜUL 2, acid-leaning folksters like The INCREDIBLE STRING BAND as well as a healthy dose of Nordic folk music, TUSMØRKE present a dark cauldron of magical, musical potions.

The band's history dates to the mid-nineties and a budding Scandinavian scene of new progressive bands. The Momrak twins, who would become the core of TUSMØRKE, called their band LES FLEURS DE MAL. That group included future WOBBLER vocalist Andreas Prestmo and shared the stage with other up-and-coming bands such as WHITE WILLOW. Eventually the collective morphed into TUSMØRKE, whose music is darker, more intense and even primeval than their more delicate predecessor.

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TUSMØRKE discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

TUSMØRKE top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.75 | 60 ratings
Underjordisk Tusmørke
2012
3.71 | 41 ratings
Riset Bak Speilet
2014
3.74 | 58 ratings
Ført Bak Lyset
2016
3.58 | 31 ratings
Hinsides
2017
3.15 | 27 ratings
Bydyra
2017
3.86 | 49 ratings
Fjernsyn i Farver
2018
2.33 | 12 ratings
Leker for barn, ritualer for voksne
2019
3.75 | 28 ratings
Nordisk Krim
2021

TUSMØRKE Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

TUSMØRKE Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

TUSMØRKE Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.74 | 18 ratings
Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~
2018

TUSMØRKE Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 1 ratings
Demo 1997
1997
4.75 | 4 ratings
Salmonsens Hage / Singers & Swallows
2012
3.32 | 9 ratings
Den Internasjonale Bronsealderen
2013
4.80 | 5 ratings
Offerpresten
2013
0.00 | 0 ratings
Sankt Sebastians Alter
2017

TUSMØRKE Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Nordisk Krim by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.75 | 28 ratings

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Nordisk Krim
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars For some time now, an explosive and varied prog scene has been active in Norway, in which each of the bands involved has a personal and recognizable sound, which draws on tradition, especially that of the 1970s, but filters it with a certain type of modernity. We therefore range from Wobbler, to Ring Van Möbius, Seven Impale, Motorpsycho to Jordsjø, to, with sounds ranging from symphonic prog to psychedelia and hard. Among the veterans of this scene there are certainly the Tusmørke, active since 2009 with this moniker, but formed in the Telemark area in 1994 as Les Fleurs Du Mal.

Compared to its predecessor works, "Nordisk Krim" is characterized by its own penchant for psychedelic to spacey sounds, i.e. by bubbling, shimmering or chirping sounds that, in addition to the actual music, repeatedly create a bizarre atmosphere . "Dog's Flesh" is almost completely in this style, although the center of the trudging rhythm is actually a slightly folky motif à la "Herr Mannelig" - in the mix it has something of Hawkwind things like "Children Of The Sun" . "Et Moselik" also conjures up a mystery mood with keyboard choirs and repetitive rhythms, but shares a certain monotony with "Dog's Flesh", these sounds are actually all in the balance.

In other ways, too, Tusmørke travel a little more often to strange spheres than usual in 2021, which stylistically also means more and more diverse grips in the 70s cosmos. For example, there is something like - again Hawkwind - "Lost Johnny" plus some orientalisms, some straightforward organ-rock passages in "Cauldron Bog" or "Black Incubation", it sounds like it came from 1971, as with the compatriots of Ring Van Möbius, who are probably the current reference in this regard.

Orientation on this album also has some effects on the folk prog, which is actually less affected by it and with which Tusmørke have become fairly well known in recent years. The rhythmically looser, less driven and, on the other hand, more synthetic approach with its cooler and slightly distant-looking attitude ensures that the situation is a bit different here as well. Pieces like "Ride The Whimbrel" and "Cauldron Bog" tend to come through the back door and also turn out to be correspondingly more convoluted, which, however, makes them appear much more bulky at the beginning. The folky passages get a different look too.

The fact that Nordisk Krim ends up in the double-digit range is due to the second CD, which turned out much better. This is mainly due to the two longtracks, of which the final, eighteen-minute (The Marvelous And Murderous) Mysteries Of Sacrifice offers the full breadth of the band-typical, folk-influenced prog, including expansive instrumental passages in which the whole glory of analog keys comes to the use.

"Nordisk Krim" is definitely recommendable, because there are so many details in the songs. So if you already think TUSMØRKE is good, this will serve you quite well.

Four stars with an extra thumb up.

 Ført Bak Lyset by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.74 | 58 ratings

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Ført Bak Lyset
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars "Fort Bak Lyset", released less than two years after Tusmørke's second album "Riset Bak Speilet", has a playing time of less than 45 minutes. First of all, that begs the question: Do retroprog albums really have to be long? After all, the great classics of that time weren't records that now have to be released on double CDs. On the other hand, Tusmørke apparently save up material for EPs and singles from time to time, which can be added later on CD issues as excellent bonus material, as happened for example with the debut album "Underjordisk Tusmørke".

In any case, under this premise, "Fort Bak Lyset" actually promises something like amusement, so let's check out the subject matter of this album. In any case, nothing fundamentally changed in the style of the Norwegians, but that was not to be expected either. The sextet from Oslo is still playing a folky and eccentric retro-prog, which is characterized by Norwegian singing, the complete lack of a guitar and instead extensive use of flutes and other wind instruments.

Structurally, however, Tusmørke are once again relatively light on the road - at least on the surface. If you listen more closely, it turns out that behind the simple sequences of intro, verse, chorus, repetition, instrumental part and the end there is still a lot going on. Above all, the opener "Ekebergkongen" and later "Spurvehauken" bear witness to this: In the former, the stanzas and the instrumental passages are constantly varied around the "In der Halle des Bergkönig" motif, and "Spurvehauken" seems to be his Developing the refrain properly with each development - whether it should be called that at all is questionable at the latest when after about 3 minutes the "refrain" has long since become an independent part and the last round is used as an outro. Elsewhere, too, Tusmørke seem to reinforce various stylistic characteristics. The melodies in "Et Djevelsk Mareritt" and "Nordmarka" - here with a harmonious reference to the Russian traditional "Korobeiniki" - are very folkloric even for band relationships, whereas the driving "De Reiser Fra Oss" is much more psychedelic and psychedelic Spacerock tends to. The latter piece also stands out because of the completely detached chorus and also enchants with the meticulousness with which the accompaniment was arranged - it is remarkable how many small cogwheels interlocking voices are used to create the rhythm. The other side, however, are funky accompanying motifs including clavinet sounds in the final "Vinterblot" or - which is curious enough - at the end of the folky opening "Nordmarka". Here Tusmørke even go a little in the direction of the middle Gentle Giant - polyphony.

The last two numbers are actually designed as long tracks and do not have to subordinate their development to a "conventional" stanza-chorus scheme. Paradoxically, however, these pieces seem somehow less tangible than the other songs, which in turn is due to the relatively "soft" sound of the band, whose greatest strength lies in the interaction of the instruments. So far that would be the only minor flaw in "Fort Bak Lyset", which is going through an interesting change as an album anyway - and that with a playing time of just 44 minutes. Yes, it is actually entertaining, this gem.

 Riset Bak Speilet by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.71 | 41 ratings

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Riset Bak Speilet
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars There were certainly many people who have been waiting longingly for a new Wobbler album since "Rites At Dawn" and it was advisable to look for alternatives. One of these is in the form of Tusmørke, who have allied personalities and have released their second album this year with "Riset Bak Speilet". Or at least partially, because the two bands are actually quite different.

The songs of "Riset Bak Speilet" are dominated by groovy rhythms, which are mostly kept throughout the entire song. On top of that you layer a lot of bombast, folky melodies and one or the other weird to psychedelic dangling. As a result, these pieces sound like a single non-stop intoxication that swings from one romantic mood to the next without being boring. Because in fact this number is designed full of rhythmic barbs, melodies that go beyond the metrics and other details that are appropriate to the general euphoria and also provide a lot of invigorating driving force. Seen in this way, it's not much different than on "Rites Of Dawn", although some passages actually sound like Wobbler. This includes, for example, the oriental retro-prog part after about 5 minutes in "Gamle Aker Kirke" or the nice flute break after about 3:40 minutes in "All Is Lost".

Well, this style is completely new. In view of the latently gloomy, sometimes eccentric melody ("Offerpresten", title song) and occasional saxophone use, Van der Graaf Generator in particular can be named as role models, especially for her catchy, aggressive phase around "Godbluff" and "World" record "(numbers like" A Place To Survive "can be used as a comparison), Jethro Tull, Ñu, Black Widow, Jade Warrior and so on in view of the numerous flute entries. Some stomping passages ("Black Swift", "All Is Lost") are more reminiscent of space rock, and of course you also have a few well-tried moods from great rock classics in store, such as the "Stairway To Heaven" mood in "Gamle Aker Kirke ".

A smaller drawback is the unexciting, not always sound-proof vocals, which at best pass as a tribute to the early Ian Anderson, but otherwise have a lot more in common with the usual Hawkwind Krakeele. And as nice as the sound may be, the numbers don't look like too much in terms of composition in that the overall structure is missing. Instead, the numbers flow like jams from mood to mood, which is a bit reminiscent of the style of Hidria Spacefolk records (after all, the title song offers a bit of variety here, but returns to its main motif with nice regularity).

However, in order to come to the conclusion, the fact that the music is always appealing and often even quite rousing - it often just sounds too tempting and too professional . Tusmørke can pat themselves on the shoulder for having already released one of the outstanding albums of 2014.

 Underjordisk Tusmørke by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.75 | 60 ratings

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Underjordisk Tusmørke
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars Apparently "Underjordisk Tusmørke" just like its first-class successor "Riset Bak Speilet" has not attracted much attention in the prog cosmos - so Tusmørke are still not mentioned in the same breath as other brilliant bands. That's a shame, because the Norwegians are already hinting at a lot here that made last year's second work so special. As there are: Plenty of references to Van der Graaf (Generator), Jethro Tull, Black Widow and Yes, the tendency towards fast moving pieces, a feeling for subtle arrangements and always a touch of mysticism. All of this can be found in the six regular songs on this album and the separately released singles "Salomonsens Hage" and "Singers & Swallows", and the quality can mostly compete with that of the follow-up album.

"Watching The Moon Sail Out", "The Quintessence Of Elements" and "Salomonsens Hage" stand out in particular. The former starts out as a nice mixture of jazz and folk including a (unfortunately underproduced) Tusmørke skilfully lead from this to a fun folk middle section, which gradually increases to the faster-paced final part. In this again the Wobbler bonds predominate, whereby the German choirs ("Stay a while! You're so beautiful!") are almost space rock. "The Quintessence Of Elements", on the other hand, can be interpreted as a joke, as the piece for this title is built around a pentatonic of all things. In addition, this piece has a ritual-repetitive structure and thus has a good touch of Black Widow and Protoprog in general (especially this march middle section). Otherwise a lot is repeated here, but I've already written that (you read a meta-joke). Finally, "Salomonsens Hage" also goes to the Black Widow corner with a driving rhythm and is definitely a "hit". The well-coordinated attacks of Zerrbass and flute, the unreal harmony and the fact that something with "witches ..." always seems to emerge from the Norwegian text fit in with this. To a lesser extent, the other pieces are also successful, whereby the fast and relatively dark "A Young Man And His Woman" as the (also lyrical) predecessor of "All Is Lost" is noticeable.

The fact that "Underjordisk Tusmørke" lags behind its successor is due to a few other tracks. In fact, "A Nightmare's Just A Dream", "Høstjevndøgn" and "Singers & Swallows" demonstrate the following characteristics: The associated rhythm is increasingly slow and trotting and a noteworthy structure with the exception of successful refrains (especially the dramatic intensification of "A Nightmare's Just A Dream "is reminiscent of" Life On Mars "by David Bowie) does not exist. Do you know something like that? Perhaps from the Finnish Orne's only album to date: A good year earlier, they had made a boring record from the same retro ingredients, which suffered from slow tempo and weak sonic structures in combination with more or less droll vocals here and there. So it follows that Tusmørke also ran the risk of going this way at the time. Well, by now we know that luckily it didn't turn out that way. But neither of them have become famous.

 Nordisk Krim by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.75 | 28 ratings

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Nordisk Krim
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Progfan97402
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Tusmørke followed their children's album Bydyra with Fjernsyn i Farver which was back to the more mature music style and subject matter. They recorded a second children's album with Leker for Barn, Ritualer for Volksne and you can't think of a more 180 turn than to their followup Nordisk Krim. It's because it's full of gory and gruesome lyrics worthy of countless death and black metal bands. The concept behind the album stems from the Momrak brothers visits to Danish museums during their childhood depicting dead bodies in bogs from ancient ritual sacrifices. Seems this practice was done all over ancient Europe, and they mention several important remains including Lindow Man in England (which I knew about in the 1980s BBC TV series The Celts, which features a pre-fame Enya providing music) on the song "Moss Goddess". Anyways this is perhaps their most grand and epic album they've ever done, with the most creepy and graphic lyrics they've ever delivered! The Momrak brothers Benediktator (Benedikt) and Krizla (Kristoffer) are present as always, with HlewagastiR (that is Martin Nordrum Kneppen of Wobbler on drums). and with Lars Fredrik Frøislie absent, we get Haugebonden Gode Gullstein on keyboards, who has a much more scaled-down gear setup, sticking mainly to a couple of synths, Hammond organ, and Mellotron (likely an M4000D which is not tape-driven but sampler keyboard that samples Mellotron, kind of like if M-Tron was a standalone keyboard instead of a computer app). Plus we get Åsa Ree on violin, who also appeared on Wobbler's new release Dwellers of the Deep. With music clicking at over 80 minutes this is a double album in every way and I believe this is the lengthiest release they ever done. The first three cuts are the most accessible, with "Age of Iron Man" being their idea of a "hit single" (but never sacrificing their dignity, thankfully) and a promo video was made ahead of the album's release. As usual the video is very interesting and the band always inserting their humor in their videos. "Mumia" sounds like Tusmørke in a nutshell as it's very typical for them. "Dog's Flesh" is an instrumental piece and a really eerie sounding piece. They really get trippy here towards the end where I can see comparisons to Krautrock being made here. Then comes "Moss Goddess". I don't know if it was intentional but I swear in parts of the song they're spoofing the lyrics to Cat Stevens' "The First Cut is the Deepest" with lyrics that go "The last gasp is the deepest / Death's kiss is the sweetest" Regardless if the band had "The First Cut is the Deepest" or not recording this piece I can't help but think they're parodying the song in regards to ritual sacrificial bog victims in Denmark. Plus they reference several major remains (including the ones in Denmark including I presume the ones they seen in childhood) asking if they died for nothing. "Et Moselik" and "Hoksejakt" are the only two songs song in their native Norwegian, the latter being a rather upbeat piece which seems strange giving the morbid nature of the lyrics to the album. The final is the 17 minute "(The Marvelous and Murderous) Mysteries of Sacrifice" clocks in at 17 minutes and I really dig those flute passages and the narrations. The narration really sends chills to my spine. Most of the rest of this piece consists of jamming. In conclusion this is a really amazing album, but it's also not the most accessible. As the album progresses the songs get longer and weirder. This is truly the band at their most grand and epic. Plus those lyrics are certain to drive away dinner company. This album really comes highly recommended!

Update: Repeated listens only review how such an amazing album this really is. It really grew on me. I'd even go as far as saying this is their crowning achievement, with some of the finest material they ever presented us. I've noticed a stronger VdGG vibe in the music this time around. I'd even give this a five star rating if it weren't for the fact it's not exactly the most accessible album out there. It's sort of like Harmonium's L'Heptade in that manner, a very difficult to get into masterpiece (although of course they're very different). Both double albums. If you got scared off Tusmørke because of one of their children's albums, you need to reconsider them as those were just a couple of untypical side-projects. Nordisk Krim may not be for Tusmørke newbies (try Underjordisk Tusmørke, Ført Bak Liset, or Fjernsyn I Farver first) but for an epic adventurous ride this is just what you need!

 Riset Bak Speilet by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.71 | 41 ratings

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Riset Bak Speilet
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Riset bak speilet (= 'The Birch Behind the Looking Glass') is the second album by the Prog Folk group Tusmorke (= Twilight) from Oslo, Norway. Apart from Bydyra (2017) which, as music from a children's musical, gives a completely false picture of the band, I'm not very familiar with the other albums. By the way, interesting that their record company at this time was Svart Records from Finland.

The CD edition contains three bonuses, two of them pretty long, stretching the CD length to 71 minutes. The album contains lyrics both in Norwegian and in English, and the Norwegian lyrics are translated in the booklet. 'Offerpresten' (= 'The Sacrificial Priest') is an uptempo song full of tradition-honouring folk prog elements reminiscent of Jethro Tull's Songs from the Wood era. Flute and vintage keyboards sound very delicious, but I'm not so fond of trumpet and sax -- luckily this is their sole appearance on the album. The instrumentation is the fullest on this hectic opening track. The slower and more calm 'Gamle aker kirke' is about an old church and is confusingly sung in English. Nice, moody melodies and a beautiful retro soundscape featuring lots of flute and some Mellotron. This is exactly what a Prog Folk enthusiast likes to hear. 'Black Swift' has a bit bigger emphasis on the chorus with vocal harmonies reminding of the late 60's stuff of e.g. The Moody Blues and Omega.

Dark-toned 'All Is Lost' has heavy guitars and is actually the dullest composition to me, despite some little signature changes and nice flute work. The 15-minute title track (the second song with Norwegian lyrics) is the longest and the most dynamically progressive. At times I wish there were less vocals, but the instrumental sections are all the more effective.

The first one of the bonuses sounds very Medieval: I can imagine hooded monks accompanied by a small group of musicians who at the end wander into slightly experimental gloominess. The two pieces of roughly 10 minutes length rival the main album's highlights. So, even if you're a vinyl enthusiast, it's definitely wiser to have the CD in this case. This is among the best Prog Folk albums of this decade, with a full blooming of both sides of the term.

 Bydyra by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.15 | 27 ratings

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Bydyra
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This album has two preceding reviews, both surprisingly favourable 4-stars. Therefore I feel I have to bring the more negative point of view as a warning to anyone who is trying to decide whether to buy the CD or not. The crucial question is: can you imagine enjoying a happy-go-lucky CHILDREN'S MUSICAL (in Norwegian), with the children's choir backing on most of the openly naiive songs? Because, if you are generally not a friend of children's music, chances are that this music will irritate you too. This is not progressive rock for adult listeners, this is primarily children's music. Yes, the instrumentation does lean towards Prog Folk, there are flutes, Glockenspiel, Mellotrons and vintage synthesizers, but the vocals are VERY central and VERY pure children's music, not only for the presence of children's choir but also for the irritatingly naiive singing style of Benediktator (as the Tusmorke vocalist and multi-instrumentalist wants to call himself). The few vocal-free moments and perhaps also some choir- free moments with B's vocals only, are like glimpses of an album that a Prog Folk fan might wholeheartedly enjoy.

Some background information: the music is taken from two children's musicals staged at flautist-vocalist Krizla's workplace, a primary school in Oslo, in 2015 and 2016. For Tusmorke it "has been one of several long-term plans for expanding the creative output of the band into new areas". The musical was to be "about urban wildlife, the skyrocketing prices of housings in Oslo, the financial crisis, social issues, global warming, and good and bad magic." The main characters in the story are some animals that lose their home tree, or something like that. Some songs like 'Rottekongen' (= Rat King) are extremely irritating in my opinion. The choruses are very very simple and heavily repeated. Moreover, nearly all songs are rather similar with each other. I'm afraid I'm sounding like a children's hater -- which I'm definitely not -- but to me the continuous presence of the kid's choir, and the childish singing style of Benediktator, really eats the music's potential.

Frankly, I have listened to better children's music -- and also more progressive; especially Finnish children's music from the early seventies -- when it comes to the eclectism in compositions. The playing, ie. the Prog Folk arrangement, is charming, but unfortunately it has a minor role in this music. What a pity! Subjectively I can't rate this musical recording any better than two stars as I choose not to re-listen it ever again, and I bet that an average fan of Tusmorke's 'adult' output will be disappointed. But if you're a friend of children's music and enjoy the plain bright naivety in it, or if you wish to find some prog-related children's music for your kid(s), then by all means get it.

 Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~ by TUSMØRKE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2018
3.74 | 18 ratings

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Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Norwegian band TUSMORKE has been a going concern for more than 20 years, but haven't really established themselves as recording artists until the past five years or thereabouts. They have been a creative band for the past few years though, and following their 2012 debut album they now have seven full length studio albums to their name. "Osloborgerlig Tusmorke" is the most recent of these, and is the second studio album released by the band in 2018.

Tusmorke is a band that have many sides to them, and on this particular occasion they have assembled a collection of tunes that celebrate the spirit of vintage era progressive folk rock and vintage era symphonic progressive rock blended into and alternating with the earthen and pastoral landscapes explored. Timeless progressive rock with a vintage feel to it, and with a clear orientation to the folkier parts of the progressive rock universe. An album well worth a check if this is a description that strikes you as interesting.

 Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~ by TUSMØRKE album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2018
3.74 | 18 ratings

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Osloborgerlig Tusmørke ~ Vardøger og Utburder Vol. 1 ~
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Antonis Kalamoutsos

4 stars One can't expect ordinary things from a far-from-ordinary band as Norway's Tusmorke. The fact that is the second album they release in the same year and, mostly, that Osloborgerlig Tusmorke: Vardoger og Utburder Volume 1 is consisted of 'curios', demos, outtakes and songs that weren't qualified for previous ones, would be more than enough to not anticipate a remarkable outcome. Let's be honest, albums of previously 'unwanted' material usually address to diehard fans only. Surprisingly, Tusmorke took a very special care of this material in order to present a solid and coherent album and they succeeded this beyond any doubt.

The first way to achieve this was by creating a conceptual basis for all the songs. As a result, this is a loose but a real concept album, one that explores the history and myths of the beautiful city of Oslo. It's a simple but very clever way to thematically unify songs that could otherwise be unrelated. This idea is especially assisted by Tusmorke' s musical style which actually reminds or remains strongly bonded with the notion of an undefined past.

Respectively, their musical approach furthermore projects that eerie and elusive sense of times bygone. There are no new elements added to their established progressive folk style but this album's perspective seems to be focusing slightly more to the folky angle of their music. For example, only 3 tracks feature standard drums while the majority is based on percussion. There are very few distorted keyboards and as a result, minimum electric guitar imitation (which is something like a trademark for the band) and the whole vibes are more laid back, colourful, cheerful even in cases like ''Djeveren fra Oslo''. It seems that some of the darker sides of Tusmorke were left behind for this album but that feeling of magic and mystery remained intact.

The vibes from Tusmorke' s music is always eccentric albeit their songwriting feels normal and solid. Their eccentricity lies in the fact that, unlike many other 70s-inspired bands, Tusmorke don't sound like reproducing or copying sounds they love. There is truly something timeless that follows them instead, the collective energy of a band that convinces the listener they are trapped in a timespace of their own, like a mythical psych/prog/folk rock of an alternative reality. Tusmorke would be equally 'outsiders of great value' 40 years ago as they are in the present.

The quintessence of Osloborgerlig Tusmorke: Vardoger og Utburder Volume 1 hides in its wonderful arrangements. As already said, the compositions are melody-oriented and they hold no surprises, twists or turns. They invest on the sonic warmth instead, with excellent use of keyboards (with some of the best key instruments of all time as always) and especially wind instruments. And while the flute is a protagonist throughout the album, it's the marvelous voice of the clarinets that steals the show. The 11 minutes of the final track ''Gamle Aker Kirke'' prove my claim, in a composition that has to be considered the album's highlight.

A truly unexpected album, as the odds seemed to be against it, Osloborgerlig Tusmorke: Vardoger og Utburder Volume 1 showcases once more that Tusmorke is one of those bands which, while bringing nothing new to prog music, carry a very strong personality instead. The listener can be convinced and this is what actually matters. And as Oslo waits the travelers to solve its riddle, a riddle formed among drakkars, modern architecture, fancy clubs and gloomy gothic cathedrals, Tusmorke just add to the mystery. They add that distant echo that comes from somewhere deep in Oslo's woods, wherever these might be.

 Fjernsyn i Farver by TUSMØRKE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.86 | 49 ratings

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Fjernsyn i Farver
Tusmørke Prog Folk

Review by Windhawk
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars Norwegian band TUSMORKE was formed back in the middle of the 1990's, but didn't actually become recording artists until 2012. Since then the band have grown considerably in status and stature, with half a dozen albums to their name at this point. "Fjernsyn i Farver" is their most recent studio album, and was released by Norwegian label Karisma Records in the spring of 2018.

While "Fjernsyn i Farver" doesn't strike me as the most obvious buy for those with a fascination for the folkier landscapes of the progressive rock universe, this is an album featuring details that crowd would enjoy and to some extent this aspect of the band is one you need to enjoy, just like the striking vocals. But as far as I'm concerned, this is a production that by and large should find most favor among those who find bands such as Atomic Rooster and Black Widow to be compelling. For people with that leaning, that haven't come across Tusmorke yet, this production may well feel like a revelation when uncovered.

Thanks to [email protected] for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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