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DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP

Crossover Prog • United States


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Dream The Electric Sleep biography
DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP are a progressive rock band from Lexington, KY. Formed in 2009, guitarist/vocalist Matt PAGE and drummer Joey WATERS recruited bassist Chris TACKETT (formerly of HYATARI and CHUM). The trio spent the following two years developing a unique sound characterized by an eclectic blend of influences. Although primarily rooted in progressive rock, the band employs elements of classical, folk, doom, psychedelic and pop. In early 2014, guitarist Andrew HIBPSHMAN was introduced to reinforce the band's live sound.

Upon its 2011 release, the self-produced debut album 'LOST AND GONE FOREVER' received positive international attention, gaining a wide variety of print and online reviews (including Classic Rock Magazine, Eclipsed Magazine and Progression Magazine), and was an underground favorite amongst many in the progressive rock and crossover/heavy rock communities. As a result, the band was asked to perform at one of the premier progressive rock festivals in the United States, the Rites of Spring Festival (RoSfest), and were given the coveted 'CHURCH OF PROG' slot.

The band returned from RoSfest in May 2013 to finish recording their sophomore LP with long-time friend and engineer Jason GROVES.

Released in February 2014, 'HERETICS' features 11 tracks and over 70 minutes of new original material, the band continues to evolve its signature genre-bending sound. Described by The Big Takeover's Jack Rabid as ''Prog-Shoegaze'', DTES have again produced an album that draws from a diverse pool of influences. Among them are the classic progressive sounds of GENESIS, PINK FLOYD, KING CRIMSON and THE MOODY BLUES - with nods to U2, RIDE, CATHERINE WHEEL, and RADIOHEAD.

With 'HERETICS', DTES continue to push the envelope - not only on the band?s album themes and subject matter, but sonically as well. Fans will discover an extremely dynamic, thought-provoking work in 'HERETICS' - an album that reveals a band that is more focused than ever, and becoming increasingly difficult to pigeonhole.

Biography provided by the artist and used with permission

Dream The Electric Sleep official website

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DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP discography


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DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.20 | 11 ratings
Lost and Gone Forever
2011
3.81 | 132 ratings
Heretics
2014

DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

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DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 2 ratings
Acoustics and B Sides
2012

DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Heretics by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.81 | 132 ratings

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Heretics
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by DrömmarenAdrian

1 stars Oh what an interesting cover. Here we can study a female saint and many black and white photos of now dead people, only women as it seems. The name of the record is "Heretics" and the band is from the United States and is called Dream the Electric Sleep. It is the band's second studio album and it's totally new.

Well, sometimes the music reaches the heart so emergant so nothing else than five stars would be inappropriate. Your feelings in one way hide you from the more logical truth. But why shouldn't they. Music is art and art is not objective. On the other side there is also music that you find so wrong and non-appealing that you want to protest and just give the record one star. This is perhaps an example of the latest. I have listened to the record carefully twice and I don't have any interest in what I hear. I would also be so rude and say that the squeaky and smoothed vocals together with the alternative rock music just make me irritated and my ears want to cry out their need for something more traditional.

Obviously this is a record that people love and perhaps you should give it a try, especially if you like "modern" music, I'm not sure I do that, I am a prog conservative. I had hard to hear similarities with other prog bands. Neither did I hear a song which I liked on this album or did I hear anything unique. So sorry, this wasn't in my taste!

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 Heretics by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.81 | 132 ratings

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Heretics
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by PsychoFunk

5 stars Greetings ProgArchivers!

This is my first review so let me start by saying I've been following this site for a long time and THANKS for all the great music reviews! I've discovered a lot of awesome music as a result.

Anyway, HERETICS has inspired me to submit this review because I truly believe this album is special and required listening for any prog or rock fan! The blend of creative melodies mixed with a powerful rhythm section makes for a unique and invigorating sound! This album really should be experienced in its entirety because the tracks blend so well with each other, but yet each track has something that separates it from the other. Also the lyrics are deep and the singer uses melody and phrasing in very creative ways that really drew me in. This album has moved me personally and I haven't been this excited for a new band since I first heard Deloused in the Comatorium by The Mars Volta.

DTES has soul and substance which is lacking somewhat in the music I hear these days!

If you want just a taste I'd recommend just starting out with the first two tracks "Heretics" and "Elizabeth", but if you are willing to take the plunge and listen to the entire album you will be rewarded with the beautifully powerful "Ashes Fall".

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 Heretics by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.81 | 132 ratings

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Heretics
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by Aldebaran_Well

4 stars Such an intriguing band name for us P.Dick fans, a wonderful cover, being a trio (who doesn't love power rock trios?), big fuss around the band's quality and free to download: Dedicating some hours to ''Heretics'' seemed a very easy decision. The big question was one: Is the fuss justified? Have no doubt about it!

The first thing to notice is that DTES sounds like a super group. Their music shows such maturity, confidence and personality that would suit an arena-filling band and not three guys from Lexington, KY, in their second album, which is distributed for free. This characteristic in sound, songwriting and performance is so intense that immediately distinguishes DTES from the pile of newcoming bands. This is material for major labels and worldwide promotion.

DTES claims to be a progressive rock band and I love them for that. The truth is there are only a few prog elements to be found. I would describe them mostly as an incredibly artistic hard rock band. Their sound is massively electroacoustic, very unique in style and with a wide range of influences. Some Floyd and Genesis here and there, mainstream 80's rock (U2, Police), some alternative in the vein of early Pearl Jam, post rock (due to the extended use of atmospheres from guitar delays and reverbs) and certainly a lot of blues, especially in the guitar solos. At some moments, the melodic parts of straight hard rock bands like Indian rockers The Cult and Warrior Soul came to my mind. The band infiltrates all these elements (and more) into a new sound but what I love the most is this sound's mood: it's powerful and energetic, commercial without being cheesy, major but not too happy, minor but not too melancholic. I found some relevance with the good albums of Dredg, not in sound but in vibes.

All compositions are built around Matt Page's charismatic voice. If a band's success depends mostly on its singer, than DTES really have a great chance. His voice is different, filled with colorful tones, good old fashioned rocking clarity and well built technique. Sometimes, he resembles Jeff Buckley, in the way that he uses his vibrato at high notes and this is a very rarely-given compliment. His guitar playing is equally amazing, perfectly filling all the gaps and setting the stage for the fantastic vocal lines. Joey Waters & Chris Tackett deliver a more straightforward and rough sound in their rhythm section, trying to achieve excellence through simplicity. And they generally do. I also find it impressive that the band never uses heavy stereotypes and remains focused at its own vision, at all times.

There is not one mediocre moment here. All songs are of the same quality level, if you like one you will like all and I guess the opposite is true, too. So, I find no use in describing them separately. There are five epic songs longer than 8 minutes but I have to say that my favorites are ''Utopic'' and ''Fist to face'', two shorter tracks with magical melodies that hooked in my brain for weeks.

What DTES should do, in my opinion, in order to achieve even greater heights: Maybe a bit shorter duration than 75 minutes or a bit longer instrumental parts. A bit less dirty production. Wider use of other instruments (as Gazpacho did) would add grandeur to an already very colourful music.

Summing up: rock music of extreme quality from an unexpected band, music that every progster should find at least enjoyable. I think that DTES can achieve wonders artistically and, given the right resources/promotion, commercially too. Prog community should embrace and support them by all means, this is a band that can make us all proud. ''Heretics'' will definitely be on my top-10 list for 2014. Eagerly waiting to see what's next.

87/100. 4 electric stars!

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 Heretics by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.81 | 132 ratings

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Heretics
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by Gallifrey

5 stars Oh, how I've missed this.

2013 was hardly a stellar year in my ears. I honestly consider 2013 in music to be one of the biggest statistical anomalies, because given that I heard over 300 albums, there should be a high chance that there would be plenty of classic records. But alas, the only album to gain a high rating from me was The Raven That Refused to Sing (And Other Stories) (8.7), whereas there were eight albums and two EPs from 2012 that gained higher than that merit. As a person who bases everything I do on statistics, and gets very frustrated when they don't fit perfect curves or trajectories, this was truly frustrating indeed. So, I'm glad to announce that not only has the first month of 2014 brought me the best album of the year so far, but it's also the best album of last year as well (if that makes sense (it probably doesn't)).

Dream The Electric Sleep are an American band who have been around since 2010, and this is their second album. I have their first album as well, but I have honestly been too immersed in this to pay attention to much else. Heretics is a long album ' over 70 minutes, and is a concept album regarding something about women and oppression in the early 20th century. For those who are interested in lyrics (not me, honestly, although there are some great bits of sibilance scattered throughout), vocalist Matt Page has done a write-up on the concept here. I was first drawn to this album from here on RYM of all places (not usually my first stop for progressive rock), when I noticed an abnormally high 4.15 rating from 15 users. Even though many users are notable for rating albums too highly, five of the ratings were from my 'trusted' group of users here, people who give high ratings sparingly, so this 4.15 really meant something, especially to my statistically inclined mind. I have been meaning to phase out my constant listening to new music recently (although I'm kinda failing), but there was no way I could skip over this. A quick google later, and I found that this was in fact released on bandcamp's fantastic name-your-price platform, which has heralded some true gems over the years (including four of the ten releases from 2012 that I mentioned).

At the core of its sound, Heretics is hard on the progressive end of the alternative-progressive rock fusion genre that I (and a handful of other people) are calling post-prog. The immediate comparisons to bands like Muse and The Dear Hunter stem from Matt Page's indie and alternative influenced croon, which soars over the atmospheric and epic instrumentation in a variety of ways. On the ballad track 'To Love Is To Leave', the rather beautiful hook line is delivered in a way that definitely calls to mind Children of Nova's Teo, with the indie-style vocals that adorned tracks like 'It's Just A Ride'. Dream The Electric Sleep are in no means an indie band, but like an lot of these post-prog bands, they feel like a band firmly rooted in alternative rock that takes the genre to the extremes with its structuring and instrumentation, hence the progressive rock genre tag.

Imagine if Thirty Seconds to Mars had continued along the progressive stylings that they have hinted at on a couple of records, add in some of Anathema's skill at crescendos and epic builds, and Matthew Bellamy's theatricality and over-the-top vocals, and you might have an idea of what Heretics sounds like. Or, at least, an idea of what a track like 'Elizabeth' sounds like, easily my favourite one on here. Many might take my comparisons to Thirty Seconds To Mars as an insult, but I mean them in the greatest way possible, and to claim that the glorious and intense chorus of 'should you find the sun, will you let us know?' is not reminiscent of some of the melodies atop This Is War is ridiculous. And I honestly believe that this album, in many ways, is the album that I've always wanted Thirty Seconds To Mars or Muse to make, but their mainstream inclinations and the fact that Jared Leto is a superstar in two realms of art (and Matt Bellamy is married to Kate Hudson) have kept them from making it.

But what makes Heretics brilliant, and above a lot of today's straight progressive rock, is the same sort of elements that keep me coming back to the bands I loved when I was younger. Sure, Muse and My Chemical Romance may not have the most interesting or complex arrangements, song structures or instrumentation, but they always had those spinechilling melodies, the ones that are so simple yet so beautiful that you forget everything you've learnt about appreciating odd time signatures and long tracks and just be immersed in the melody. When I hear the chorus of 'Elizabeth', I feel these same feelings. There's something so utterly enthralling about the melody, it's crushing, it's euphoric (as much as I hate that word now), it really transcends music and becomes something beyond that.

But it's not as if Dream The Electric Sleep are just this. The bands I mentioned, especially Thirty Seconds To Mars, rely solely on these devices, on making their music emotional and epic, but Dream The Electric Sleep do actually have complex instrumentals, they do actually have longer tracks, and they are much more than just simple alternative rock. We have five songs here that push past eight minutes, and if you count the double-hit of 'Lost Our Faith' and 'How Long We Wait' as one entity (the seamless transition does suggest that), then it has a 12-minute run time. But instead of taking the prog clich' of filling the record with meaningless solos and instrumental jams in 13/8, they focus more on atmosphere and song development. The longer tracks here have excellent pacing and structure, never feeling their length at all. The opening cuts of the title track and 'Elizabeth' have a brilliant energy that runs through them, mostly due to the tight rhythm section, particularly the pounding and intense drumming. The aforementioned pair of 'Lost Our Faith' and 'How Long We Wait' have a similar energy, never once dying down, even between the tracks.

The rhythm section of drummer Joey Waters and bassist Chris Tackett dominate a lot of this record, creating some excellent jams in the album. The opening title track is a mostly instrumental affair, aside from a couple of verses sung through a megaphone, and the grooves that they get into with the instrumentals remind me quite a bit of Russian Circles' heavier moments, particularly the drumming style and the fact that the majority of the bass on the record is played with a pick. The picked bass also gets some quite Muse-sounding parts coming through in the instrumental sections, particularly the explosive finale of the ballad 'To Love is to Leave', which sees them leave behind all 'ballad' connotations of the track, with some more epic vocals coming through a megaphone, and a driving bass riff in 7/4 that dominates the last few minutes, one of the few moments in the album when an odd signature is used.

Aside from controlling the music through his excellent vocals (and great work on layering said vocals), frontman Matt Page also dominates the music through his guitar work, regularly combining multiple layers of guitar to create a fantastic atmosphere. Page's guitar style has been regularly compared to David Gilmour in terms of his drawn-out and atmospheric soloing, but there is certainly some modern influence to his playing, most notably the influence from shoegaze and use of tremolo-picking in his solos, as well as in the layering under the verses. To continue to praise it, 'Elizabeth' has some excellent tremolo in the intro, adding to the great tension created by the rhythm section. Utopic's final solo also has some great use of it, and combined with the rumbling basslines, begins to sound a bit like something that Matthew Bellamy would do in a solo. But although Page is certainly a talented guitarist, often reminding me of Circus Maximus' Mats Haugen in his grasp of melody and motifs, a few of the solos here do tend to drag or feel a bit forced and unnecessary. Possibly my only critique of 'Elizabeth' is how the second solo comes in, feeling rather jarring and killing the mood of the chorus a bit. It later develops into a rather fantastic instrumental jam, but a few of these solos could benefit from being cut in half. Similarly, a few of the longer tracks begin to drag on a bit, although I've praised the pacing in 'Elizabeth' and 'How Long We Wait' a track like 'It Must Taste Good', while it holds an excellent melody and great driving riff, after about 5 minutes it begins to get a bit samey and feel tired. 'The Name You Fear' is probably the weakest track on here as well, so it does feel like the album has a bit of a dip in the middle, until the final section of 'I Know What You Are' comes flying in.

But if the middle of the album has any sort of dip in quality, from the ending of 'I Know What You Are' out, the band firmly cements that they haven't run out of steam at all, with four great tracks coming after. The crescendo finish leading into 'Fist to Face' reminds me a lot of Anathema in its chord progressions, especially 'The Lost Child' from Weather Systems. 'Fist to Face' is the shortest full track here, but contains one of the best choruses the band have made, strong and memorable. But the real star of this second half is the 9-and-a-half-minute epic 'How Long We Wait', as well as its tense two-minute introductory track 'Lost Our Faith', and I feel the songs would never work separately. Opening with a deliciously melodic riff on top of paced drumming, I'm thrown back to the glory of 'Elizabeth', but with far more of a positive vibe, and happier emotions. Like 'Elizabeth', the energy in this track is phenomenal, and during the first two minutes the band run through a montage of the best vocal hooks they could come up with, never once dying down, until a Floydian atmospheric break comes in, followed by an absolutely spinechilling scream. At this point, the track feels straight out of a Muse record, but we all know that they would never have the ambition or self-belief to do something this epic. If I have one nitpick with this track, it's that I kind of wish the lead riff from the intro came back in and they drilled out another chorus (basically just because it's too good to only have two repeats), since the ending ambience feels a bit empty after such an epic, although it makes an excellent transition into 'Ashes Fall'.

Heretics isn't just the best post-prog album of the last few years, or even the best progressive rock album of the last few years. In my ears, this is the best album since July of 2012, full stop. And on top of that, I feel this may be the greatest album in the post-prog genre to date in my ears. Or at least up there with Rhythm, Chord & Melody and Sound Awake. Any real problems I have with this album are pretty minimal and easy to look past. I think the number of solos on the album could have been split at half at least, and the ones included could be a bit more focused, and as I mentioned before, the middle of the album starts to drag a bit, and I'm sure the album would benefit from being a bit shorter and more focused. It may not be perfect, and it is in no sense set in stone as my album of the year spoiler: click to read, but it's certainly the best I've heard in a while, and a stellar addition to any collection. Don't miss this.

9.0

Originally written for my Facebook page/blog: www.facebook.com/neoprogisbestprog

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 Heretics by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.81 | 132 ratings

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Heretics
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by Philodendron

5 stars Absolutely my favorite album that I've heard this year and I can't imagine hearing something come out later this year that will dethrone it. Dream the Electric Sleep is a 3-person band, which is hard to believe after listening to the album due to the immense sound that they produce.

To me, the music sounds completely unique in its style, the drumming is mostly a pulse pounding beat (which as a drummer I haven't heard much like, making it very awkward to play which is proving to be great exercise to improve my drumming), beautiful riffs and INCREDIBLE vocals that are very contagious (I've lost my voice singing along in car rides by myself a number of times)

Be sure to check out A GUIDE TO THE HERETICS, which can be found on the bands website, which explains the concept of the album. The lyrics are beautiful and empowering.

Highlight tracks are Heretics(starts off blistering and ends beautifully), Elizabeth, Fist To Face, Lost Our Faith (so powerful.. those vocals), How Long We Wait (again.. those vocals), and Ashes Fall.. But in all seriousness there is not a single track that is worth skipping.

For me, this is an essential album.

5/5

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 Heretics by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.81 | 132 ratings

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Heretics
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by Second Life Syndrome
Collaborator Post/Math Rock and Crossover Teams

5 stars As the pounding rhythm of Dream the Electric Sleep's new album 'Heretics' blasts its way into your ear canals, you can tell that you are in for some inspired, incredible music. Dream the Electric Sleep hails from Lexington, KY; not exactly a hot spot of progressive activity. Yet, the band has crafted what will surely be seen as one of the best of 2014, for sure. Aside from having a great name based on Philip Dick's novel, Dream the Electric Sleep has loads of massive sounds to share with us, and they also seem to have a connection with their fans that is pretty rare nowadays.

The band is made up of Matt Page on vocals/keys/guitar, Joey Waters on drums/vocals, Andrew Hibpshman on guitar, and Chris Tackett on bass. The guys display a mix of sounds and influences that are quite eclectic. I once described their music as a mix of indie rock and Anathema's style of climactic melodies with a vocalist that reminds me of Kim Benzie of Dead Letter Circus. I think I'd stand by my description for the most part, but I would also add U2 in there somewhere. With delicate acoustic guitars and roaring electric licks, pounding and well-mixed drums, awesome bass, and ultra-melodic and atmospheric keys; the band has a fresh sound that feels seasoned, mature, and inspired on multiple levels. The first thing that caught me about this album was the style of melody. As I said, they are rather climactic, but the beauty and variety are even more noteworthy. There is something so pure and so emotional and so real about the way this band composes music, and you cannot help but feel they are right there in front of you. The melodies are very distinct for each song, and many of them feel very much like an old favorite for some reason. They are as original as they come, but the melodic style of Dream the Electric Sleep is such that the music just feels right.

'Heretics' is more than music, though. It is a concept album based generally upon the women's suffrage movement, and the torn hearts that its proponents held within themselves. One thing that really impresses me about Dream the Electric Sleep is there clarity of mind. Fans want to know what lyrics mean, plain and simple. The band provides this in their Guide to Heretics, a loose breakdown of the album. As one that appreciates lyrics, this is seriously impressive. The content, then, is rather emotional and moving, and the band certainly wants it that way.

Again and again this album floored me. I didn't really connect on the first listen, but I was really gripped on the second time. 'Heretics' is a fantastic introduction, but it leads into my favorite song on the album, the delicate and pleasant 'Elizabeth'. Matt Page's vocals are truly sublime on this track, and throughout the album, even. Yet, the album never lets up, as it delivers the massively acoustic 'Utopic', the lovely 'To Love is to Leave', and the strangely groovy 'It Must Taste Good' (my second favorite). Excellent songs join each other end to end, and the album pushes on breathlessly. The album finishes with the climactic 'How Long We Wait' and the slightly heavier 'Ashes Fall', both amazing and rather theatrical in some ways. 'Heretics' never lets you go, and this is especially true because of the variety on the album. We get emotionally heavy songs, delicate nostalgic ballads, complex structures, and experimental collaborations. I just love it.

Dream the Electric Sleep's 'Heretics' is a must-hear for 2014. It's that simple. Any serious progressive fan should hear it, but the music is such that anyone could love this album. With overarching melodies, giant displays of finesse, varied compositions, and even occasional chaotic moments; 'Heretics' is truly something distinguished from the pack and exceptionally produced. Get this album, as it's FREE for download on their Bandcamp page. That's right, it's FREE, though you should really give them at least a little for this monster album. Give. Support. Share.

4.5 stars

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 Lost and Gone Forever by DREAM THE ELECTRIC SLEEP album cover Studio Album, 2011
3.20 | 11 ratings

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Lost and Gone Forever
Dream The Electric Sleep Crossover Prog

Review by apps79
Special Collaborator Neo Prog Team

3 stars This band with the odd name hails from Lexington, Kentucky and was found in 2009 by guitarist/vocalist Matt Page and drummer Joey Waters.They were joined by bassist Chris Tackett, who had a good background playing with the Metal groups Chum and Hyatari.For two straight years the trio developed its sound and focused on songwriting, eventually the seeds of these attempts became the 70-min. long album ''Lost and gone forever'', released in 2011 both digitally on bandcamp and as an independent CD format.

I could split Dream the Electric Sleep's style in two different paths.The first one comes in a very modern Heavy/Prog Rock style with some Alternative Rock touches thrown in, a bit like PORCUPINE TREE and compatriots UNIFIED PAST, always with the strong guitar riffing in evidence backed up by a confident rhythm section.Their music offers varied rhythmic tones, powerful parts with punchy riffs and solid, scratching solos.Vocals are very good with a palette of different expressions, clean and dynamic, and the songwriting is pretty great with tight links between the multiple tempos.The second one comes in a more melodic vein without lacking in heaviness, based on more harmonic themes, more melodious textures and even with a Neo Prog vibe around, where the band sounds a lot like ENCHANT.These pieces even feature alternations between fiery and smoother electric textures, often supported by dual vocal arrangements and more Prog-oriented touches with slight YES overtones, even if their style is very contemporary to be fully compared with the British masters.The album contains also some colorful keyboards at moments, performed by Matt Page, always in a supporting role but definitely adding a more grandiose approach.No weak tracks in here, the album is characterized by a surprising consistency and its bursting passion for energetic and well-crafted music.

An album you should definitely check-out.Modern, dynamic and at moments melodic Heavy Prog Rock with great songwriting and intense musicianship.Strongly recommended...3.5 stars.

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Thanks to kev rowland for the artist addition.

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