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MILES DAVIS

Jazz Rock/Fusion • United States


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Miles Davis biography
Miles Dewey Davis III - May 26, 1926 (Alton, Illinois, US) - September 28, 1991

Miles Davis was not only a gifted musician (trumpet and composition) but also a major artist of the twentieth century. He was in a constant search for new forms of expression. Having been a painter himself, and not unlike Pablo Picasso he tried to renew himself in all periods of his life. He played on various early bebop records, recorded one of the first cool jazz records, developped modal jazz, and was a pioneer in jazz rock . Only a few musicians have mastered like him to shape new forms and set aesthetic milestones.

The "electric" period of Miles Davis started in 1969 and ended in1975 when Miles retired due to health problems until the end of the seventies. In these years Miles distributed an important part to jazz rock. Columbia released four studio records 'In a silent way'(1969), 'Bitches Brew' (1970), 'A tribute to Jack Johnson' (1970), 'On the Corner' (1972) and an important number of live records (some released on vinyl only in Japan) : 'Black Beauty'/Live at the Fillmore West (1970), 'Live-Evil' (1970), 'Dark Magus' (1974) 'Agharta' (1975), 'Pangaea' (1975). A great part of the studio tracks recorded during these years were only released in the second half of the 70's and first half of the 80's on various compilations.

Beginning with 'In a silent way' Miles used mainly riffs or short segments and more often just simple rhythmic figures that would serve as a base for collective improvisation. At the same time the rhythmic changed from tertiary jazz rhythm to binary rock rhythm. Guitarist John Mc Laughlin became one of the key elements of the electric Miles sound. Influenced by Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles, Miles Davis used during this period for the first time new studio techniques, new electronic instruments (among them the Fender Rhodes electric piano) and new sound devices, (Miles would use heavily the Wah-Wah pedal, popularized by Hendrix) to enlarge the sound spectrum of his music. Miles was among the first musicians to realize the full potential of modern recording studios. He and his longtime producer Teo Macero recorded non-stop whole sessions, with the intention to choose and assemble the material afterwards. They would use this technique in an extensive way, especially on 'Bitches Brew', creating musical "puzzles" through multiple edits, up to a point where the original tracks are barely recognizable. ('Pharaoh's Dance'on Bitches Br...
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Buy MILES DAVIS Music


Kind Of Blue (Vinyl)Kind Of Blue (Vinyl)
Sony Legacy 2011
$20.65
$17.81 (used)
The Lost QuintetThe Lost Quintet
Sleepy Night Records 2020
$16.98
Kind of Blue (Blue Vinyl)Kind of Blue (Blue Vinyl)
IMPORTS 2016
$20.59
$21.93 (used)
Birth Of The Cool [LP]Birth Of The Cool [LP]
Blue Note 2016
$16.90
$20.41 (used)
Bitches BrewBitches Brew
Sony Music Canada Inc. 2015
$24.08
$32.76 (used)
MilestonesMilestones
SMG 2011
$4.99
$2.71 (used)
Miles In The SkyMiles In The Sky
Legacy 2008
$3.79
$6.75 (used)
The Complete Birth Of The Cool [2 LP]The Complete Birth Of The Cool [2 LP]
Blue Note 2019
$29.19
$33.99 (used)

More places to buy MILES DAVIS music online Buy MILES DAVIS & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

MILES DAVIS discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

MILES DAVIS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 19 ratings
First Miles
1945
3.40 | 10 ratings
Boppin' The Blues
1946
3.10 | 10 ratings
Cool Boppin'
1948
3.00 | 11 ratings
Blue Period
1951
3.42 | 26 ratings
Blue Haze [Aka: Miles Davis Quartet]
1954
3.68 | 19 ratings
The Musings Of Miles [Aka: The Beginning]
1955
3.49 | 25 ratings
Blue Moods
1955
3.67 | 12 ratings
Collectors' Items
1956
3.70 | 28 ratings
Miles Davis And Milt Jackson [Aka: Quintet/Sextet]
1956
3.67 | 15 ratings
Miles Davis And Horns
1956
3.28 | 20 ratings
Miles [Aka: The New Miles Davis Quintet]
1956
3.98 | 40 ratings
Bags' Groove
1957
4.17 | 135 ratings
'Round About Midnight
1957
3.68 | 41 ratings
Miles Davis All Stars: Walkin'
1957
4.08 | 56 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Cookin'
1957
3.92 | 53 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Relaxin'
1957
3.86 | 56 ratings
Miles Ahead
1957
4.21 | 160 ratings
Milestones
1958
3.27 | 39 ratings
Ascenseur Pour l'Échafaud (Lift To The Scaffold)
1958
3.72 | 25 ratings
Miles Davis And The Modern Jazz Giants
1958
3.94 | 16 ratings
Jazz Track
1958
4.13 | 86 ratings
Porgy and Bess
1958
4.08 | 57 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Workin'
1959
4.34 | 1045 ratings
Kind Of Blue
1959
4.03 | 181 ratings
Sketches Of Spain
1960
3.65 | 49 ratings
Miles Davis Sextet: Someday My Prince Will Come
1961
4.13 | 60 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Steamin'
1961
3.43 | 37 ratings
Quiet Nights
1963
4.12 | 69 ratings
Seven Steps To Heaven
1963
3.83 | 67 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: E.S.P.
1965
4.22 | 123 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Miles Smiles
1966
4.03 | 82 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Sorcerer
1967
4.09 | 122 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Nefertiti
1967
4.03 | 92 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Miles In The Sky
1968
3.94 | 87 ratings
Filles De Kilimanjaro
1968
4.28 | 724 ratings
In A Silent Way
1969
4.25 | 720 ratings
Bitches Brew
1970
4.21 | 220 ratings
A Tribute To Jack Johnson
1971
3.84 | 119 ratings
On The Corner
1972
4.28 | 104 ratings
Big Fun
1974
4.16 | 105 ratings
Get Up With It
1974
3.47 | 54 ratings
Water Babies
1976
3.59 | 38 ratings
The Man With The Horn
1981
3.21 | 40 ratings
Star People
1983
2.55 | 37 ratings
Decoy
1984
2.68 | 37 ratings
You're Under Arrest
1985
2.49 | 70 ratings
Tutu
1986
3.50 | 51 ratings
Aura
1989
3.65 | 41 ratings
Amandla
1989
2.39 | 53 ratings
Doo-Bop
1992
3.67 | 3 ratings
Rubberband
2019

MILES DAVIS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.80 | 10 ratings
Birdland 1951
1951
3.87 | 15 ratings
At Newport
1958
3.44 | 20 ratings
At Carnegie Hall
1961
4.00 | 24 ratings
Miles in Berlin
1964
4.15 | 33 ratings
My Funny Valentine: Miles Davis in Concert
1965
3.61 | 18 ratings
Miles in Tokyo
1969
3.17 | 39 ratings
Miles Davis at Fillmore: Live at the Fillmore East
1970
4.12 | 84 ratings
Live-Evil
1971
3.20 | 29 ratings
In Concert: Live at Philharmonic Hall
1972
3.34 | 32 ratings
Black Beauty: Live at the Fillmore West
1973
4.60 | 65 ratings
Dark Magus
1974
4.35 | 62 ratings
Pangaea
1975
3.55 | 69 ratings
Agharta
1975
3.48 | 29 ratings
We Want Miles
1982
3.13 | 8 ratings
Live In Warsaw
1983
3.12 | 6 ratings
Miles Davis And The Lighthouse All-Stars: At Last !
1985
4.00 | 1 ratings
The Second Spring
1991
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Best Live
1991
4.37 | 19 ratings
The Complete Concert 1964 My Funny Valentine + Four & More
1992
3.88 | 15 ratings
Live At Montreux (with Quincy Jones)
1993
4.67 | 12 ratings
The Complete Live at The Plugged Nickel
1995
3.16 | 16 ratings
Live Around the World
1996
0.00 | 0 ratings
Bye Bye Blackbird
1996
4.00 | 1 ratings
Fat Time
1997
4.07 | 18 ratings
It's About that Time: Live at the Fillmore East, March 7, 1970
2001
3.00 | 3 ratings
Olympia - Jul. 11th, 1973
2002
4.58 | 12 ratings
In Person Friday and Saturday Nights at the Blackhawk, Complete
2003
4.00 | 1 ratings
European Tour '56 (With the Modern Jazz Quartet and Lester Young)
2006
0.00 | 0 ratings
Moondreams
2007
4.44 | 9 ratings
MIles Davis Quintet - Live In Europe 1967: The Bootleg Series Vol. I
2011
3.72 | 14 ratings
Bitches Brew Live
2011
3.00 | 2 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet - The Unissued Japanese Concerts
2011

MILES DAVIS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

5.00 | 2 ratings
Miles in Paris
1990
4.07 | 5 ratings
The Miles Davis Story
2002

MILES DAVIS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.13 | 56 ratings
Birth of The Cool
1949
3.53 | 19 ratings
Dig
1956
4.00 | 5 ratings
Miles Davis: Volume 1
1956
4.25 | 4 ratings
Many Miles of Davis
1962
5.00 | 3 ratings
Miles Davis Vol. 1
1963
0.00 | 0 ratings
Plays For Lovers
1965
0.00 | 0 ratings
Greatest Hits
1967
2.26 | 4 ratings
Greatest Hits
1969
0.00 | 0 ratings
A Man Ahead
1970
4.00 | 1 ratings
Tallest Trees
1972
4.46 | 18 ratings
Circle In The Round
1979
4.29 | 7 ratings
'58 Sessions Featuring Stella By Starlight
1991
0.00 | 0 ratings
Miles Davis (Collection)
1993
4.50 | 2 ratings
This Is Jazz: Miles Davis Acoustic
1996
0.00 | 0 ratings
Jazz Masters - 100 Ans De Jazz
1996
3.79 | 20 ratings
The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions
1998
3.28 | 6 ratings
Panthalassa: The Music of Miles Davis 1969-1974
1998
4.83 | 6 ratings
Best of the Miles Davis Quintet, 1965-'68
1999
4.96 | 9 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: The Complete Studio Recordings, 1965-'68
1999
4.32 | 19 ratings
The Complete In a Silent Way Sessions
2001
4.33 | 3 ratings
The Essential Miles Davis
2001
3.47 | 8 ratings
The Complete Jack Johnson Sessions
2003
4.12 | 14 ratings
The Cellar Door Sessions
2005
5.00 | 2 ratings
The Best Of Miles Davis & John Coltrane (1955-1961)
2006
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Very Best Of Miles davis: The Warner Bros. Sessions 1985/ 1991
2007
4.71 | 13 ratings
The Complete On the Corner Sessions
2007
3.00 | 1 ratings
Milestones
2007
2.00 | 1 ratings
Double Best Collection: Miles Davis
2007
5.00 | 1 ratings
Collections
2009
5.00 | 7 ratings
The Complete Columbia Album Collection
2009
4.00 | 1 ratings
Perfect Way: The Miles Davis Anthology - The Warner Bros. Years
2010
4.12 | 6 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Live in Europe 1969 (The Bootleg Series Vol. 2)
2013

MILES DAVIS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Miles Davis And His Orchestra Vol. 2
1953
4.00 | 1 ratings
Classics In Jazz Part 1
1954
2.00 | 1 ratings
Green Haze
1955
4.00 | 3 ratings
Collectors' Items
1957
3.50 | 2 ratings
Someday My Prince Will Come
1962
2.00 | 1 ratings
Blow / Fantasy
1992
2.95 | 3 ratings
Plugged Nickel Sampler
1995
2.00 | 1 ratings
Miles
2008

MILES DAVIS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Agharta by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 1975
3.55 | 69 ratings

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Agharta
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

2 stars In early and mid-seventies Miles Davis was heavily criticized in the jazz community for 'turning pop'. I always though this was objectively ridiculous, but listening to this 2LP live set 'Agartha' I sort of changed my mind. Before you stop reading, let me paint my background as a Miles Davis listener. I love some of his old works, even performed 'Flamenco Sketches' on lead-guitar on my final musical exam of my study, music therapy. I was initially shocked by the simplicity of 'In a Silent Way' but came around liking it. I consider 'Bitches Brew' one of the pinnacle creative outbreaks of the jazz genre, though I mostly like the influence it has had on bands like Nucleus and many others.

Now on this double live album the fusion formula is just too worn out. There are no stand-out ideas; melodies / riffs / chord progressions / leads to be found anywhere. Just some funky jamsession music with lots of solo's. No chord progressions at all. Just those one chord vamps that drag on. For me art (albeit music, poetry, movies) is about getting across meaning and content and this album is just to damn empty for me. The musical talent involved is clearly there. The psychedelic guitar solo's might have actually sounded great on an interesting chord progression. The recording quality is quite good. This is the first Miles Davis album I've encountered that enables you to totally forget you're actually listening to.. Miles Davis!

 In A Silent Way by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1969
4.28 | 724 ratings

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In A Silent Way
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

4 stars MILES DAVIS didn't become one of the jazz world's most recognizable name by chance. This relentless composer and performer never for a single moment lapsed into any sort of complacency and was constantly advancing his art form to the next level. It would have been easy for DAVIS to rest on the laurels of his lauded 1959 modal jazz masterpiece "Kind Of Blue" which propelled him to the top of the jazz world's highest echelons however he immediately steered his craft in a completely new musical direction with the following "Sketches of Spain" which tackled the complexities of third stream and orchestral jazz competently infused with Spanish ethnic folk traditions. The 60s found a consistent stream of jazz recordings from DAVIS and a mere ten years later, DAVIS shocked both the jazz and rock worlds once again with this eclectic release IN A SILENT WAY which not only began DAVIS' own eclectic period that would extend into the 70s but also gave the green light for jazz and rock artists to commingle and open the doors for the wildest jazz-rock hybridizations to come.

While on the top of his game in the jazz world, DAVIS had a knack for keeping his pulse on the musical scenes at large and had a keen command of not only the rock and pop world but also steadily incorporated the most advanced techniques of Western classical music into his style. While jazz-fusion had been slowly but steadily building throughout the 60s by the likes of various artists like Herbie Mann, Gabor Szabo and even Jean-Luc Ponty, many of these hybrids were based on incorporating ethnic and world musics into the annals of the jazz universe. Rock was clearly considered inferior subject matter and although Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention were beginning to display the fertile possibilities of such desegregation, it wasn't until MILES DAVIS released IN A SILENT WAY that it was considered a bona fide musical expression. All this despite DAVIS adding more fusion elements on the two preceding albums "Miles In The Sky" and Filles de Kilimanjaro" which steered the post-bop flavored compositions with rock music elements such as rhythm and blues, funk and other unthinkable things like electric instruments, repeated melodies and improvised jamming fortified with steady constant time signature flows.

While considered DAVIS' first true jazz-fusion album, IN A SILENT WAY owes more to the world of classical music in that its two lengthy tracks "Shhh"/"Peaceful" and "In a Silent Way"/"It's About That Time" are arranged in the classical sonata form which finds the two tracks featuring an exposition which presents the main theme, a development which moves the compositional themes through various keys and other technicalities and finally engaging in recapitulation which creates an alternative reality of the exposition. The two tracks in their entirety both extend past the 18 minute mark with each swallowing up an entire side of the original vinyl editions that emerged on 30 July 1969. Despite the classic nature of this album and its groundbreaking approach that has influenced jazz musicians ever since, the entire album was assembled from a short sessions from Studio B at CBS 30th Street Studio in New York City in February of 1969 with only a few extras recorded. The magic of the album came not only from the musicians involved but was more the product of the production and mixing laid down by producer Teo Macero. IN A SILENT WAY eschewed the post-bop gymnastics that allowed jazz musicians to exhibit their highly developed techniques but rather imbued an otherworldly atmospheric approach. Personally i would call this either spiritual jazz or dream jazz as it exudes a placid altered state of consciousness that drifts by serenely.

While the musical aspects of IN A SILENT WAY take a back seat to the atmospheric characteristics, the album is chock full of the best talent of the late 60s jazz world and successfully launched the careers of many of the newer members on board including guitarist John McLaughlin, bassist Dave Holland and keyboardist Chic Corea. While DAVIS' trumpet prowess is usually the star of the show, on IN A SILENT WAY, he remains rather obscured by the various waves of sound that oscillate with a heavier emphasis on the electric piano trade offs of Corea, Hancock and Austrian keyboardist Joe Zawinul who composed the exposition and recapitulation parts of the title track. Perhaps the most subdued role in this mellow style of jazz fusion are the drum parts of Tony Williams who propels just enough percussive drive to keep a slow steady beat which is perhaps why the jazz purists were so against this sort of development in DAVIS' evolution. Many saw this as selling out since rock music was ruling the commercial aspects of music supreme at the end of the 60s, however the jazz aspects were fully exercised with the complex harmonies and improvisations and the wind instruments which found Wayne Shorter's sax squawking and DAVIS' familiar trumpeting kept the music grounded in the world of jazz. Overall the album walked a very nice tightrope act between the jazz and rock paradigms. McLaughlin's guitar antics may have made him a huge star in the future fiery Mahavishnu Orchestra but on IN A SILENT WAY, his style is subtle and one must struggle to distinguish it from the tapestry of sound that flows like a cosmic river of time.

IN A SILENT WAY didn't exactly perform well upon its release as it went over the heads of many who were stuck in their respective expectations of what jazz or rock should be but historically, this album is now regarded as one of the most influential albums of the entire 60s as it unapologetically opened a completely new Pandora's box of musical mingling that changed the entire playbook for both rock and jazz. While a beautiful album indeed, this is one that i think gets rated so highly for its impact rather than its performances. While pioneering an entirely new reality of creative fertile cross-pollination, i don't find IN A SILENT WAY to be exactly the masterpiece that it is purported to be. On the contrary i find it as a mandatory first step for the music of the more magnanimous jazz-fusion expressions that DAVIS would conjure up with "Bitches Brew" and "Get Up With It." Those albums tackle the logical conclusion of what is presented here. Overall this album seems to just coast on like a nice road trip with no stops to see the sites. It merely presents a new idea to the audience without ramping up the extremes that would erupt onto the scene in a very short time. As a classic influential album, this indeed is a historical triumph but as a specimen of musical expression in its own right, i find it a tad on the tame side and due to the fusion creeping into both the jazz and rock worlds in the preceding years, isn't quite as revolutionary as "Kind Of Blue," however no one could ever argue that this album doesn't deserve its status as a benchmark for a new explosion of more artistic expressions of rock and jazz engaging in a hitherto unthinkable syncretism.

 'Round About Midnight by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1957
4.17 | 135 ratings

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'Round About Midnight
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Kempokid
Collaborator Prog Metal Team

4 stars Jazz is a genre of music that I tend to struggle being able to make much connection with, no matter how much of it I've tried listening to, as while pleasant, I personally find understanding what makes certain songs better than others a fairly difficult thing to do in the genre, a lot of it blending together when there's a lack of complete focus on the music. I'd say that my favourite jazz album would be whatever good sounding one I heard last (as don't get me wrong, a lot of it is exceptionally beautiful, just not always for me, at least so far), but then that would be disregarding Round About Midnight.

There's a certain sense of tranquility to be found here, even during the 2 more energetic songs of Ah-Leu-Cha and Tadd's Delight, which have a very relaxing quality about them despite being quite bombastic in performance, not to mention the alluring bassline of Ah-Leu-Cha especially. It's ultimately this sort of pleasant tone permeating the album that makes it one that I'll find myself returning to far more than any other jazz album, having that slight edge at times without becoming overbearing, but also being able to maintain consistent interest throughout. While these faster paced songs may be decent however, it's the more subtle moments that really shine, the title track and All Of You especially. The slow, soft piano brings out the beauty in the trumpet improvisation nicely in the title track, filling out the empty space in between the various solos between Davis and Coltrane, the increase of technicality throughout not even slightly disrupting how soothing and warm the sound is. All Of You has a near perfect melody that's further highlighted by the absolutely incredible interplay with the bass, while Bye Bye Blackbird manages to hit hard with its almost wistful mood and exceptionally passionate trumpet performance.

Each and every track on this album manages to be at least great, a soothing atmosphere permeating everything within without losing its subtle beauty at any point or becoming dull. The complexities rife throughout the compositions manage to enhance this album greatly, the seemingly simple melodies being complemented by the countless smaller details throughout, and the large amount of improvisation that goes on never really feels too much, instead simply perpetuating the tranquility felt throughout. While I find it hard for jazz to connect with me, this is an exception.

Best tracks: Round Midnight, Ahe-Leu-Cha, All Of You, Bye Bye Blackbird

Weakest tracks: Tadd's Delight

Verdict: An absolutely lovely jazz album that manages to perfectly maintain a balance between soothing beauty and excellent mucisianship to create an extremely pleasant listening experience through and through, and currently one of the few jazz albums to connect with me.

 Bitches Brew Live by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 2011
3.72 | 14 ratings

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Bitches Brew Live
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Derived from two live sets about a year apart - one from 1969, one from 1970 - this album focuses on Miles' and his groups' performances of Bitches Brew material in the wake of completing that album. It forms an intriguing missing link between Bitches Brew itself and the more overtly funk-influenced fusion material which followed it, with the material gaining a swagger here which the more ethereal performances on the original studio album don't really convey. The two performances by themselves wouldn't necessarily add up to much, but sequencing them one after the other is a great way to tease out how the material evolved and mutated in the live context.
 On The Corner by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.84 | 119 ratings

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On The Corner
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Trevere

4 stars In today's modern world, it's hard to keep up with the times. With the ever-expanding field of networking and recreational technology, a couple of missed Tweets, a troublesome internet connection or a few days away from your iPhone can render you unaware of what's going on in your life and the world that encompasses it. The same theory applies to music. Ideas are shared, and influences spread like wildfire. So in 1972, when late and great jazz artist Miles Davis saw his popularity with the black youth diminish and due to the influx of successful rock and funk acts, he did something about. Thus, On The Corner was born. A self-admitted attempt to reconnect with African-American teens who had turned to funk and rock, On The Corner is odd, abstract, and inaccessible. Despite being a mixed, failed attempt, it's an interesting record nonetheless.

On The Corner, like every one of his releases since Miles In The Sky, is more fusion Jazz than cool jazz. Instead of the slightly more structured, but still free-flowing, sweeping jazz of Kind of Blue, we get the mammoth structures of Bitches Brew, but without the pure innovation and entertainment value of that record. Rather, we get some new features around what is basically a very similar record. Instead of free flowing, jazzy drums, we get hard hitting, repetitious funk drums reminiscent of James Brown, which offer the listener a bit more of a concrete rhythm section to counter-balance the rock bass of the record. As well, we get massive, psychedelic guitar solos, and occasional guitar riffs intertwined between Davis' trumpeting.

While his band evolves into even more continually jagged, unstructured song masses that make them constantly more ominous and lively, Miles is on nigh pure autopilot here. His trumpet's hisses and squeals are a bit less notable and his lines are getting less and less memorable. It's hard to really feel his playing here, even if he's gotten a lot better. Technically, this is one of Miles' better efforts. On the title track; he tries to implement Coltrane's style to his trumpeting, and for about a second, actually sounds good. However, he's constantly devoted to the rough sound that is evoked on his jazz fusion material, and thus he's constantly stuck doing squealing that constantly gets less and less recognizable and more schizophrenic sounding than ever.

It's unfortunate that Miles is stuck on this tip really, because it makes the album's two shortest songs, "Black Satin" and "One and One", the best songs on the album. "Black Satin" constantly builds on a catchy eastern melody which Davis constantly improvises upon and starts with a mixture of Indian sitar sliding and bongos meshed with grumbling guitars, and. It's simple, especially for Miles at this point and age, but it works perfectly. "One and One" is pure funk jazz, with Miles spastic horn lines grooving along funky bass slaps. "One and One" and "Black Satin", amongst an album full of what would be winners for any other artist, are finally the winners for Miles.

Before and after "Black Satin" and "One and One", there are the long songs on this record. Instead of grooving and building upon themselves like previous electric Miles era material, it's just there. Those tracks, instead of managing to use Miles' interesting sound and general dissonance to create something epic like he has with most big tracks, just result in incessant jamming (and not in the manner on Bitches Brew, either). For a while, it's interesting to see where the jammers go, but it never really gets the listener interested other than in the rhythm section, where the drums and bass really provoke jiving and moving. It doesn't help that this album is pretty inaccessible. With five songs crammed into the title track, sprawling fifty-two minutes crammed into four tracks, and a wide array of influences, this album is complex, and at first, second, and maybe even third listen, doesn't portray its true value.

As a whole, Miles failed at regaining a rather lost portion of his fanbase, or even selling well for that matter. Critics scorned this album, and it's been widely forgotten. But that doesn't mean it's a bad record. The combination of funk, jazz, and rock is interesting, to say the least, and Davis is a trumpeting god. It's good, and that just goes to show how good Miles is, as this is one of his worst records. But only God knows what atrocity he would have made in an attempt to pry today's black teens from their Lil Wayne.

 Miles Davis Quintet: Miles In The Sky by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1968
4.03 | 92 ratings

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Miles Davis Quintet: Miles In The Sky
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Trevere

4 stars Listening to Jazz music is such a surreal experience. The atmosphere is often full of intensity, and what I mean by "intense", I'm not necessarily referring to the sound of the music but the artist that is creating it. The compositions are often improvised, and the musicians seem to disappear into a different realm. And within this realm, the only thing that exists is the musician and their instrument. They develop a synergy with their instrument, it becomes a part of them. Another form of communication. The instrument becomes a window into their soul, their mind, and their creativity. And the sounds that are released are like another form of expression, the kind of sensations that no arrangement of words could ever describe. Miles Davis knows this experience all too well.

The 1960's was certainly an interesting era in time. There was this urge for experimentation that just captivated everyone. Segregation had just come to an end as white individuals and minorities were beginning to experiment with coalescent communities. Hedonism was also growing in trend, as the usage of drugs and sexual promiscuity was beginning to be seen in a less condemning light. Obviously, this would grow to have a tremendous effect on music. Music began to become much more abstract. Musicians began seeing music as much more than just something to listen to, but something to get lost in. Artists begun to push music into different directions, becoming much more experimental. The late 60's was a transitional period in Miles Davis' career, as he too fell into this urge for something different. Miles In The Sky is now seen as the stepping stone into a new era for Miles Davis. Miles In The Sky introduces a growing interest in the usage of electric instruments, such as the keyboard, bass, and guitar. This album is often seen as the first from his "Electric" period. The compositions of the album come from different sessions, and we can truly see the stages of Miles Davis' evolution from acoustic Jazz to Fusion music. Again, this album was just the first step, and the electric touches are not as prominent as in the latter albums.

We begin with "Stuff". Already we can hear the usage of an electric bass and a Rhodes piano within the composition. The piano arrangements are fast paced, yet the drumming and wind instruments show a little more restrain, though often erupting into a more passionate delivery in variation. Overall, this is still the Bop-styled Miles we have heard before. "Black Comedy" and "Country Son" represent the acoustic section of the album, and are some of Miles' final orchestrations using an acoustic quintet format. "Black Comedy" is very lively and aggressive in nature, while "Country Son" displays a more atmospheric tone. But now let us move on to the perhaps most well-known composition from the album, "Paraphernalia". The composition displays one of the first electrical guitar arrangements in Miles' music. "Paraphernalia" turns bop inside-out, with intense eruption of solos appearing and vanishing in a modal or free space, and interludes of quick changes on every beat, not as accompaniment for solos, but just stated on its own.

There is such intense musicianship within Miles In The Sky. Of course, Miles is the star of the show, but I must mention the drumming of Tony Williams. He was merely a teenager when he first joined Miles Davis' Second Great Quartet, but his dexterity for the instrument is astonishing. He was 23 during the recording for this album, and his feel for the drums is such a mind-blowing performance. Despite its abstract cover art and its name, "Miles In The Sky", this album doesn't contain the psychedelic atmospheres that are found in Bitches Brew and In A Silent Way. In fact, this album is often overlooked and it's a shame because this is perhaps one of Miles' most historic releases. Not only because it marked the beginning of Miles' "Electric era", but this was one of the defining albums for Jazz Fusion. This was a release that would not only grow to influence the Jazz world, but even transcend to inspire several rock artists. This is an album that must be heard by Jazz fans, especially any admirer of Miles Davis.

 Agharta by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 1975
3.55 | 69 ratings

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Agharta
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Trevere

4 stars Miles Davis has always been the kind of musician that has never been content in settling with just one genre. Often experimenting, and fusing musical approaches to create something fresh. The mid 1970's was a peculiar time for music. Psychedelia was beginning to dwindle down and music was becoming less experimental and more jubilant. Disco music was beginning to grow in popularity, and people were looking for music to enjoy, something instantly perceptual and not necessarily abstract. Though of course there were artists, like Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin, who were still writing more intellectual compositions, but they were indeed the minority. Catchy was quickly replacing artistic, and yet again, Miles Davis fell into the trend. Funk music was at an all time high within the African-American classes, and acts like James Brown and George Clinton were reigning over the genre. In albums like On The Corner and Big Fun, we saw the beginning of Miles Davis incorporating Funk elements with his usual Jazz music.

In Agharta we find Miles Davis further exploring the possibilities of Funk music, only this time fusing it with the aggressive rock-stylings of Bitches Brew and the atmospheric nuances of In A Silent Way. In the opening number, "Prelude", we see the musicians taking apart genres and rebuilding them into a completely different sound. This piece is much more reminiscent of Rock than Jazz, as the music is produced by a prominent guitar-driven sound. "Prelude" is all Miles Davis and Pete Cosey, who flow in and out of perception with eruptions of frantic solos. There is a very cosmic sound that is being produced from the instruments, and the primary catalyst of this erratic style for the most part is Pete Cosey. We constantly hear him experimenting with a variety of guitar effects that create a surrealistic atmosphere throughout. He's very abrasive with his guitar playing technique, his sound is very distorted and bombards the listener with such prowess. But of course, even Pete Cosey's anomalous methods are not enough to eclipse the star of the show. Miles Davis is as potent as ever. And as always, he works at his own pace, and releases a variety of soloistic flaunts while often playing off of saxophonist Sonny Fortune's augmentations. There is definitely a higher level of energy in this performance, but it also displays some reminiscence of moody psychedelia.

"Maiysha" displays a much more diverse musical style. It presents itself as a delicate piece, but reveals a more aggressive side during it's progression. Sonny Fortune really takes charge of the piece with some elegant flute soloing in the beginning before the other musicians alter the musical landscape into progressive ambiences, smooth Jazz passages, and explosive guitar outbursts that seem to forget that this is not a rock concert. In the second half of the album, within "Theme From Jack Johnson" and "Interlude", we find ourselves voyaging through more realms of ambient spaces, as well as a descend into a more intense explosion of fiery Jazz Fusion with Miles Davis executing some of his finest trumpet solos to date. Aghartha is a truly exciting release from Miles Davis, and is perhaps one of his most energetic performances from the electric period. Aghartha displays some incredibly dexterous musicianship all throughout, especially from Pete Cosey who practically steals the show with his deploys of Hendrix-inspired electrical distorting devices. I highly recommend this album to any fans of Miles Davis, it highly differs from the atmospheric sound of his previous electric albums, as it contains a more elevated and aggressive style that will be sure to please any fan of Jazz Fusion.

 Filles De Kilimanjaro by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.94 | 87 ratings

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Filles De Kilimanjaro
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Trevere

4 stars Miles Davis certainly has his fair share of well-known albums. Kind of Blue is quite possibly the most popular jazz album ever. Besides Kind of Blue, Miles has popular releases such as Sketches of Spain, In A Silent Way, Birth of the Cool, and Bitches Brew. However, there still lie little footnotes in the Miles Davis discography, including one that shows a pathway from Miles' earlier work to his electric outings. Filles De Kilimanjaro, recorded in 1968, puts together recordings from two different quintets Miles recorded with in the time of June to September. Paving the way for Bitches Brew, the entire album puts whichever pianist playing on an electric piano and when Ron Carter appears, he plays electric bass.

Filles De Kilimanjaro, although under the Miles Davis name, puts Miles Davis in a much more secondary role. Sure, Miles takes extenuated solos, wanting his fair share of time at the mic, but when he solos, he is not the standout musician. Tony Williams stands out as the best musician on the album, seemingly knowing Miles Davis and his tendencies so well that he finishes all his phrases for him. History says a lot of tension creeped up between Miles and Williams, maybe because of this reason. Whoever fills out the rest of the rhythm section, whether it be the completely electric combination of Carter and Hancock or the mixed combination of Corea and Holland, sound entirely innovative and fresh. Neither of the bassists revert to normal basslines, often playing sparse and accenting certain hits. The whole band, in both quintets, has an extreme awareness about each other and knows exactly where each soloist is going. Due to this lack of form and the constant outlook of many measures ahead, the album takes a more avant-garde feel. One member remains, that being Wayne Shorter. Wayne Shorter takes the same role as Miles, a soloist and purely a soloist. His solos, especially in the more uptempo songs, fit better than Miles' soloing. Also, Williams suits Shorter much better, playing much more aggressive yet not getting ahead of Shorter and finishing things off too early for him. The other two rhythm players gel just as easily with Shorter as they did with Miles.

Upon reading the track times for the album, this appears to be an album full of songs too long for their own good. However, due to the variety invoked by the quintet, most noticeably Williams, the songs continue on without bore or tire. Despite Miles making one of his worst appearances from a playing standpoint, he makes one of his best as a composer. Every song on the album is fully composed by him, rather than having many songs composed by two or more people. With a wave of change taking over the airwaves in the 60s including Beatlemania, Jimi Hendrix, and Sly and the Family Stone, Miles found a certain infatuation with the bluesy rock coming out of the guitar of Hendrix among other popular acts of the time. For that reason, among other reasons, Miles takes his jazz compositions to a new level with tinges of rock thrown in, including a direct reference to Hendrix's "The Wind Cries Mary" on Mademoiselle Mabry. A 16 minute soother of sultry electric piano by Chick Corea, the sparse drum hits of Tony Williams, and the Hendrixian quotes in Holland's bass, Mademoiselle Mabry is built for a classic Miles Davis solo. Miles leaves all kinds of space open for his beautiful trumpet tone to shine across the airwaves. Due to this composing style, Miles has one of his best solos on the album mainly because the song suits his solo rather than the solo suits the song. This is the only song where Miles outshines Shorter in terms of soloing, but even in Miles' great soloing, Chick Corea's extensively fresh comping outshines all the other musicians.

Tout De Suite is an epic avant-garde jazz song full of all kinds of feel changes and nuance. The song opens with a disambiguated swing beat, but that changes throughout the song. Tout De Suite is avant-garde in its purest form, seeming to have no direction in terms of song form but still the entire quintet flows along together without losing any sense of connection. The song ranges from the laid back swing of the opening to an uptempo, almost fusion styled section led by the ferocious drumming of Williams. The section is a perfect showcase of Williams outdoing Miles and finishing all his phrases before Miles even gets the chance to start them. The song also shows a tired Miles Davis, pinching for his higher range and barely squeezing the notes out. Herbie Hancock makes a fantastic appearance on the Rhodes piano, a foreshadowing of his brilliance on the instrument to come in later years. In terms of soloing, Wayne Shorter makes one of his best appearances, taking the energy laid down by Williams and pushing Williams further into aggression and complexity. Never does Shorter sacrifice tone quality, even in his blisteringly fast runs. The entire rhythm section rises and falls with Shorter's intensity, knowing exactly where he is going. After a fantastic Herbie Hancock solo, although overshadowed by Shorter, the song reverts back to the laid-back feel and even throws in a quick All Blues reference from Kind of Blue. Tout De Suite is truly a brilliant song, showcasing the best of both the laid back and ferocious ability of the quintet.

All the way through, Filles de Kilimanjaro is a full out enjoyable listen, showcasing enough variety and virtuosity to not make the 70-minute album a tiring listen. Petits Machins showcases the best ability of each member of the band, arguably the best on the album although the shortest. A more uptempo and fiery the song, it is a welcome shorter listen after the epic Tout De Suite. The title track brings things down after the fiery Petits Machins, although gaining a bit of intensity in the middle. Frelon Brun simply serves as an album opener and just a taste of what's to come. The song, just surpassing five minutes, is an excellent choice to see the style of the album in a nutshell. For all jazz enthusiasts and jazz drummers especially, Filles de Kilimanjaro is a fantastic album and a lesser-known Miles album that definitely deserves more recognition and attention.

 In A Silent Way by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1969
4.28 | 724 ratings

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In A Silent Way
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Trevere

5 stars Miles Davis officially enters his electric period as he expertly combines jazz and rock on his landmark 1969 album In A Silent Way. Davis once again led the world of jazz into a new era of fusion by making use of more electric instruments and post- production effects on this album. In A Silent Way and its follow-up Bitches Brew would prove to be the standard to which all jazz fusion albums are measured, and the assembly of musicians who created these albums would all depart to create their own famous jazz fusion bands. In A Silent Way is a spectacular achievement in the history of music and stands the test of time as the high watermark for the genre of jazz fusion.

In A Silent Way was recorded in one studio session on February 18, 1969. Miles Davis came into the studio with sketches of what he wanted to record, relying mainly on improvisation to fill out the album. Four songs were recorded and later stitched together into two album side long songs by Davis' long-time producer Teo Macero. This level of post-production was unprecedented in jazz and left many people disliking the album at first, but it proved to be a revolutionary move in the history of music production.

Miles Davis was heavily into the psychedelic rock scene that was happening in America at the time, and he decided he wanted to use electric instruments on his next album. Most of the band was the same from Davis' previous album, Filles de Kilimanjaro, but with the notable additions of guitarist John McLaughlin and organist Joe Zawinul. These additions give the album a much more electric feel different from any previous jazz album, with McLaughlin's smooth finger-flying solo on "Shhh/Peaceful" and the guitar and organ groove laid down in "In A Silent Way/It's About That Time." Miles Davis assembled musicians of the highest calibre for In A Silent Way, all of whom went off to start their own jazz fusion bands that would eventually become leaders in the genre as well. Saxophonist Wayne Shorter partnered with Joe Zawinul to create Weather Report, keyboardist Herbie Hancock embarked on a magnificent solo career as his fellow keyboardist Chick Corea started Return to Forever, and John McLaughlin led Mahavishnu Orchestra. The talent present on In A Silent Way is astounding when the listener realizes the later legendary status of each member of the band.

The first song on In A Silent Way, "Shhh/Peaceful" features Davis' piercing trumpet trading off solos with McLaughlin's guitar while the keyboards and organ play a spacey mood underneath that gives the track an ominous feeling. Both songs on In A Silent Way follow the order of the initial melody followed by the second track edited on, then a coda back to the beginning. The stitches where the two tracks were edited together are noticeable but don't interfere with the flow of the music, as Teo Macero expertly weaves his way through the extended improvisational jams that the band gave him. "Shhh/Peaceful" goes from a quiet and dark mood in "Shhh" to the upbeat "Peaceful." John McLaughlin's low-key note-bending solo is relieved by Wayne Shorter's clear and captivating soprano saxophone before the song is returned to the beginning and we get a repeat of the first six minutes of the song. This may seem like a lazy production technique but it works well to introduce and bookend the solos of the amazing "Peaceful."

"In A Silent Way/It's About That Time" is the second of the two songs on In A Silent Way. "In A Silent Way" starts with a soft and slow guitar melody from McLaughlin backed by ambient chords from the keyboards to create a sleepy mood. Davis' trumpet jumps in to play a sweet melody before the song is cut and launches into the opposite feeling; the fast and groovy "It's About That Time." This 11 minute long middle section is characterized by the underlying groove created by the bass and keyboards as John McLaughlin plays another smooth but technical solo overtop. As the main bass line finally takes shape about halfway through the song, Wayne Shorter takes over and plays a masterful solo on the soprano sax that takes the listener through peaks and valleys as he navigates through the dense fog of organ and keyboard tones. Just as in "Shhh/Peaceful," "It's About That Time" hits the coda and returns to the beginning of "In A Silent Way" at the end, which prompts the listener to start the extraordinary cyclical album all over again.

With In A Silent Way, Miles Davis created the genre of jazz fusion while also releasing the best album of said genre in one fell swoop. In A Silent Way is not only a landmark in the history of jazz, but music as a whole. The album brought forth a new era of experimentation in music that has influenced countless artists since its release. In A Silent Way is an artistic achievement in music and a true classic album in every sense of the word.

 Live-Evil by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 1971
4.12 | 84 ratings

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Live-Evil
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Trevere

5 stars Miles Davis has always been the kind of musician that has never been content in settling with just one genre. Often experimenting, and fusing musical approaches to create something fresh. The albums of Miles' Electric period contained music that is very abstract, amalgamating the ambient nature of Psychedelic Rock with the enthusiasm for free-form improvisations that are found in Jazz. The content of Live-Evil truly reflects the philosophy of Miles' spiritual predecessor, Bitches Brew. The music of Bitches Brew were not just mere Jazz compositions, they were the recipes for a spell. A work of sorcery- a magical brew that invited any curious enthusiast to embark on it's trance. The music of Live-Evil shares that similar aesthetic, evocative and impressionistic. Coated in darkness, yet exhibiting that irresistibly alluring quality.

We begin with "Sivad". It opens with a jubilant introduction, a barrage of sounds flourishing with intensity, yet exquisitely coordinated. But all this elevation soon comes to a stop as Miles reveals to us that there are still a few spells of sorcery in his bag. "Sivad" then enters into a more delicate atmosphere brewed by the musicians, having us descend into that familiar trancing state of mind, entering a realm of instrumental mysticism. Live-Evil is a truly mesmerizing performance, as Miles Davis is coming at us from all directions. Tracks like "Little Church" display how Miles' band can project delicate ambiences, just as easily as they can produce instrumental eruptions of utter aggression, like the ones encountered in "What I Say" and "Funky Tonk". And it's all orchestrated with such confidence. The dexterous coalescence of different musical approaches within this album's content almost make this performance too overwhelming for the senses. And that is perhaps the true beauty behind Live-Evil, the willingness to experiment with the music.

"Medley: Gemini/Double Image", for example, presents itself in such a lethargic mood, yet it releases these mind-altering sounds reminiscent of psychedelia. "Inamorata", on the other hand, represents the more energetic side of the album, while also reflecting that same spellbinding hypnotism of Bitches Brew. "Inamorata" redefines Jazz Fusion- This is Miles and his band showing absolutely no self-restrain, and unleashing an excessive series of solos appearing and vanishing in a free-form environment. This is a truly magnificent performance, containing music that transcends past traditional Jazz as it incorporates other genres such as; Psychedelia, Funk, and Rock. This is one of the most definitive Jazz Fusion records in the discography of Miles Davis and must be heard by any fan.

Thanks to alucard for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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