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MILES DAVIS

Jazz Rock/Fusion • United States


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Miles Davis biography
Miles Dewey Davis III - May 26, 1926 (Alton, Illinois, US) - September 28, 1991

Miles Davis was not only a gifted musician (trumpet and composition) but also a major artist of the twentieth century. He was in a constant search for new forms of expression. Having been a painter himself, and not unlike Pablo Picasso he tried to renew himself in all periods of his life. He played on various early bebop records, recorded one of the first cool jazz records, developped modal jazz, and was a pioneer in jazz rock . Only a few musicians have mastered like him to shape new forms and set aesthetic milestones.

The "electric" period of Miles Davis started in 1969 and ended in1975 when Miles retired due to health problems until the end of the seventies. In these years Miles distributed an important part to jazz rock. Columbia released four studio records 'In a silent way'(1969), 'Bitches Brew' (1970), 'A tribute to Jack Johnson' (1970), 'On the Corner' (1972) and an important number of live records (some released on vinyl only in Japan) : 'Black Beauty'/Live at the Fillmore West (1970), 'Live-Evil' (1970), 'Dark Magus' (1974) 'Agharta' (1975), 'Pangaea' (1975). A great part of the studio tracks recorded during these years were only released in the second half of the 70's and first half of the 80's on various compilations.

Beginning with 'In a silent way' Miles used mainly riffs or short segments and more often just simple rhythmic figures that would serve as a base for collective improvisation. At the same time the rhythmic changed from tertiary jazz rhythm to binary rock rhythm. Guitarist John Mc Laughlin became one of the key elements of the electric Miles sound. Influenced by Jimi Hendrix and The Beatles, Miles Davis used during this period for the first time new studio techniques, new electronic instruments (among them the Fender Rhodes electric piano) and new sound devices, (Miles would use heavily the Wah-Wah pedal, popularized by Hendrix) to enlarge the sound spectrum of his music. Miles was among the first musicians to realize the full potential of modern recording studios. He and his longtime producer Teo Macero recorded non-stop whole sessions, with the intention to choose and assemble the material afterwards. They would use this technique in an extensive way, especially on 'Bitches Brew', creating musical "puzzles" through multiple edits, up to a point where the original tracks are barely recognizable. ('Pharaoh's Dance'on Bitches Br...
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MILES DAVIS discography


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MILES DAVIS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.47 | 26 ratings
First Miles
1945
3.25 | 12 ratings
Boppin' The Blues
1946
3.00 | 12 ratings
Cool Boppin'
1948
2.87 | 15 ratings
Blue Period
1951
3.18 | 36 ratings
Blue Haze [Aka: Miles Davis Quartet]
1954
3.58 | 25 ratings
The Musings Of Miles [Aka: The Beginning]
1955
3.48 | 34 ratings
Blue Moods
1955
3.52 | 21 ratings
Collectors' Items
1956
3.65 | 34 ratings
Miles Davis And Milt Jackson [Aka: Quintet/Sextet]
1956
3.55 | 22 ratings
Miles Davis And Horns
1956
3.22 | 27 ratings
Miles [Aka: The New Miles Davis Quintet]
1956
3.96 | 58 ratings
Bags' Groove
1957
4.17 | 159 ratings
'Round About Midnight
1957
3.78 | 58 ratings
Miles Davis All Stars: Walkin'
1957
4.00 | 76 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Cookin'
1957
3.95 | 74 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Relaxin'
1957
3.83 | 72 ratings
Miles Ahead
1957
4.17 | 187 ratings
Milestones
1958
3.34 | 65 ratings
Ascenseur Pour l'Échafaud (Lift To The Scaffold)
1958
3.69 | 32 ratings
Miles Davis And The Modern Jazz Giants
1958
3.93 | 21 ratings
Jazz Track
1958
4.06 | 112 ratings
Porgy and Bess
1958
4.00 | 79 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Workin'
1959
4.36 | 1221 ratings
Kind of Blue
1959
4.05 | 239 ratings
Sketches Of Spain
1960
3.70 | 67 ratings
Miles Davis Sextet: Someday My Prince Will Come
1961
3.94 | 75 ratings
The Miles Davis Quintet: Steamin'
1961
3.38 | 53 ratings
Quiet Nights
1963
4.05 | 91 ratings
Seven Steps To Heaven
1963
3.86 | 89 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: E.S.P.
1965
4.17 | 154 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Miles Smiles
1966
3.97 | 115 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Sorcerer
1967
4.04 | 160 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Nefertiti
1968
4.03 | 124 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Miles in the Sky
1968
3.96 | 118 ratings
Filles de Kilimanjaro
1968
4.28 | 862 ratings
In A Silent Way
1969
4.26 | 853 ratings
Bitches Brew
1970
4.17 | 281 ratings
A Tribute To Jack Johnson
1971
3.90 | 168 ratings
On The Corner
1972
4.27 | 141 ratings
Big Fun
1974
4.21 | 140 ratings
Get Up With It
1974
3.45 | 73 ratings
Water Babies
1976
3.56 | 54 ratings
The Man With The Horn
1981
3.24 | 55 ratings
Star People
1983
2.64 | 53 ratings
Decoy
1984
2.73 | 53 ratings
You're Under Arrest
1985
2.62 | 96 ratings
Tutu
1986
3.51 | 69 ratings
Aura
1989
3.45 | 58 ratings
Amandla
1989
2.46 | 70 ratings
Doo-Bop
1992
3.03 | 15 ratings
Rubberband
2019

MILES DAVIS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.82 | 11 ratings
Birdland 1951
1951
3.47 | 26 ratings
At Carnegie Hall
1961
4.07 | 28 ratings
Miles in Berlin
1964
4.17 | 40 ratings
My Funny Valentine: Miles Davis in Concert
1965
0.00 | 0 ratings
Miles In Tokyo
1969
3.63 | 19 ratings
Miles in Tokyo
1969
3.26 | 47 ratings
Miles Davis at Fillmore: Live at the Fillmore East
1970
4.17 | 110 ratings
Live-Evil
1971
3.28 | 36 ratings
In Concert: Live at Philharmonic Hall
1972
3.45 | 44 ratings
Black Beauty: Live at the Fillmore West
1973
4.65 | 90 ratings
Dark Magus
1974
4.24 | 87 ratings
Pangaea
1975
3.73 | 94 ratings
Agharta
1975
3.54 | 40 ratings
We Want Miles
1982
2.88 | 8 ratings
Live In Warsaw
1983
3.15 | 7 ratings
Miles Davis And The Lighthouse All-Stars: At Last !
1985
4.00 | 1 ratings
The Second Spring
1991
2.50 | 2 ratings
The Best Live
1991
4.38 | 21 ratings
The Complete Concert 1964 My Funny Valentine + Four & More
1992
3.97 | 18 ratings
Live At Montreux (with Quincy Jones)
1993
4.55 | 20 ratings
The Complete Live at The Plugged Nickel
1995
3.29 | 19 ratings
Live Around the World
1996
4.00 | 1 ratings
Bye Bye Blackbird
1996
4.00 | 1 ratings
Fat Time
1997
3.56 | 18 ratings
At Newport 1958
2001
4.08 | 24 ratings
It's About that Time: Live at the Fillmore East, March 7, 1970
2001
3.00 | 3 ratings
Olympia - Jul. 11th, 1973
2002
4.60 | 15 ratings
In Person Friday and Saturday Nights at the Blackhawk, Complete
2003
4.00 | 3 ratings
European Tour '56 (With the Modern Jazz Quartet and Lester Young)
2006
4.00 | 1 ratings
Moondreams
2007
4.59 | 17 ratings
MIles Davis Quintet - Live In Europe 1967: The Bootleg Series Vol. I
2011
3.79 | 18 ratings
Bitches Brew Live
2011
3.00 | 2 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet - The Unissued Japanese Concerts
2011
4.00 | 2 ratings
What It Is: Montreal 7/7/83
2022
4.00 | 1 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: In Concert at the Olympia, Paris 1957
2023

MILES DAVIS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.50 | 6 ratings
Miles in Paris
1990
4.06 | 7 ratings
The Miles Davis Story
2002

MILES DAVIS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.12 | 70 ratings
Birth of The Cool
1949
3.55 | 20 ratings
Dig
1956
4.17 | 6 ratings
Miles Davis: Volume 1
1956
4.25 | 4 ratings
Many Miles of Davis
1962
4.50 | 4 ratings
Miles Davis Vol. 1
1963
0.00 | 0 ratings
Plays For Lovers
1965
0.00 | 0 ratings
Greatest Hits
1967
2.33 | 5 ratings
Greatest Hits
1969
0.00 | 0 ratings
A Man Ahead
1970
4.50 | 4 ratings
Tallest Trees
1972
4.44 | 23 ratings
Circle In The Round
1979
4.29 | 7 ratings
'58 Sessions Featuring Stella By Starlight
1991
0.00 | 0 ratings
Miles Davis (Collection)
1993
4.50 | 2 ratings
This Is Jazz: Miles Davis Acoustic
1996
0.00 | 0 ratings
Jazz Masters - 100 Ans De Jazz
1996
3.91 | 27 ratings
The Complete Bitches Brew Sessions
1998
3.48 | 10 ratings
Panthalassa: The Music of Miles Davis 1969-1974
1998
4.00 | 1 ratings
Jazz Showcase
1998
4.90 | 10 ratings
Best of the Miles Davis Quintet, 1965-'68
1999
4.97 | 11 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: The Complete Studio Recordings, 1965-'68
1999
4.28 | 23 ratings
The Complete In a Silent Way Sessions
2001
4.60 | 5 ratings
The Essential Miles Davis
2001
3.83 | 15 ratings
The Complete Jack Johnson Sessions
2003
4.23 | 20 ratings
The Cellar Door Sessions
2005
5.00 | 3 ratings
The Best Of Miles Davis & John Coltrane (1955-1961)
2006
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Very Best Of Miles davis: The Warner Bros. Sessions 1985/ 1991
2007
4.83 | 19 ratings
The Complete On the Corner Sessions
2007
3.00 | 1 ratings
Milestones
2007
2.00 | 1 ratings
Double Best Collection: Miles Davis
2007
5.00 | 1 ratings
Collections
2009
4.73 | 11 ratings
The Complete Columbia Album Collection
2009
4.00 | 1 ratings
Perfect Way: The Miles Davis Anthology - The Warner Bros. Years
2010
4.29 | 12 ratings
Miles Davis Quintet: Live in Europe 1969 (The Bootleg Series Vol. 2)
2013

MILES DAVIS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
Miles Davis And His Orchestra Vol. 2
1953
4.09 | 2 ratings
Classics In Jazz Part 1
1954
2.00 | 1 ratings
Green Haze
1955
4.00 | 3 ratings
Collectors' Items
1957
3.50 | 2 ratings
Someday My Prince Will Come
1962
0.00 | 0 ratings
Concierto de Aranjuez
1965
0.00 | 0 ratings
Time After Time
1984
2.00 | 1 ratings
Blow / Fantasy
1992
2.95 | 3 ratings
Plugged Nickel Sampler
1995
2.00 | 1 ratings
Miles
2008

MILES DAVIS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Miles Davis Quintet: Nefertiti by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1968
4.04 | 160 ratings

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Miles Davis Quintet: Nefertiti
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

4 stars To be sure, this has to be one of the most talented lineups ever in jazz history--and despite Miles' collaborators being in their young 20s and most definitely showing signs of some immaturity, the greatest innovation occurring here is with Tony Williams' drumming.

1. "Nefertiti" (7:52) a rather dull and slightly melodic lead song with Miles and Wayne up front has some rather adventurous performances from Herbie Hancock and, especially, the dynamic Tony Williams. (13.25/15)

2. "Fall" (6:39) another pleasant, melodic song in which the musicians are operating more nearly on the same wavelength--until fourth minute, that is, when Tony begins to go off into his own world, rhythmically, beneath Herbie's piano solo, but then he backs off and gets very quiet during Wayne's following solo and what follows. Interesting! (8.875/10)

3. "Hand Jive" (8:54) a much more dynamic song construct with Ron Carter walking all over his upright double bass while Tony Williams flies around his cymbals and toms. There is an odd, subtle shift in tempo in the third minute that I do not think is intentional but obviously not considered significant enough to correct or redo--and Ron Carter is not always "in the pocket" (at least not according to these amateur ears), but the song certainly displays the skills of all of the band members, with a considerable amount of time given to Wayne Shorter's solo in the middle. When Herbie is next given his turn, he seems a bit lost at first, but, after he gets warmed up, he starts to move better. Maybe everybody's just a little overwhelmed or intimidated by Tony's creativity (and Ron's hot-and-cold conformity to the "pocket"). (17.5/20)

4. "Madness "(7:31) more of the same as the previous song with Ron's fast walking and Tony's cymbal play providing the bulk of support beneath one of Miles' more dynamic and passionate solos on the album. The trio seem quite entrained. Then Wayne is given the nod to take over from Miles. He's not quite as dynamic but very impressive for his softer, breathy notes. When it comes time for Herbie's turn, everybody nearly cuts out, with only Ron and Tony remaining beneath part time, not flying around the fretboard and cymbal like they were. But then they return to their earlier form as Herbie heats up, though not quite as synched as they were with Miles--which may have something to do with Herbie's less smooth, less-melodic approach. And then they all come back together ever-so briefly before bringing the song to a quick close. (13.375/15)

5. "Riot" (3:04) Same cymbal play from Tony while Ron machine guns around the upper registers of his bass and Herbie plays a lot of chords beneath Wayne's initial lead. Then Miles is there, too. It's nice to hear the whole band working together (and Tony does get a little more active as the song develops). (8.875/10)

6. "Pinocchio" (5:08) a song that feels more like standard or old Miles bebop or hard bop. Opening with the whole rhythm section behind Wayne and Miles, Ron and Tony become more active as the song develops, something that is more noticeable during Wayne's solo (as Miles and Herbie check out). Tony really picks it up here, even when Miles and Wayne return to recapitulate the main melody. Then Herbie gets his solo. It's good, probably the best on the album, but then its over and the band pulls together to close. Very tight, "standard" jazz tune. (8.875/10)

Total Time 39:08

I think this album is most significant for confirming how much of a force drummer Tony Williams is (and is going to be). As impressive as Tony is (and Miles and Wayne, as well), I think Herbie Hancock and Ron Carter are showing how much growth they have yet to achieve--especially to be able to achieve the moment they are called upon.

B/four stars; an excellent album for prog rockers to gain insight into the genius of some of Jazz-Rock Fusion founders and all-stars--especially the phenom that was drummer Tony Williams.

 Blue Haze [Aka: Miles Davis Quartet] by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1954
3.18 | 36 ratings

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Blue Haze [Aka: Miles Davis Quartet]
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by siLLy puPPy
Special Collaborator PSIKE, JRF/Canterbury, P Metal, Eclectic

3 stars The early discography of MILES DAVIS and jazz artists in general has always been and remains a complete mess! It seems the record industry didn't really grasp the proper methodologies of organizing releases until the late 1950s when it seems some kind of standard emerged and everything became easier to track. But before 1956 or so it was the wild west. Take this release by THE MILES DAVIS QUARTET for example. No database can seem to agree when exactly it was released and that comes from the fact that what is now known as BLUE HAZE was originally released as a 10" LP simple titled THE MILES DAVID QUARTET in 1954 and then re-released as BLUE HAZE in 1956. The official DAVIS website also considers it released in 1954 despite the name change.

Some sources call this a compilation while others cite it as a legit album although the tracks were certainly recorded from May 1953 - April 1954. Whatever the case the album covers the early years of MILES DAVIS' legendary career when he was cranking out the typical bop of the era with varying musicians joining in on every track. The lineups of any MILES DAVIS album were legendary and these earliest releases are no exception. This amazing display of mid-50s bop featured some of the biggest names of jazz yet to come with Horace Silver, Charles Mingus, Art Blakey and Max Roach joining in on various tracks along with pianist John Lewis, alto saxist Davey Schildkraut and drummer Kenny Clarke also joining in. Bassist Percy Heath is the only musician to sit in on every track on BLUE HAZE.

Despite the tracks featuring different lineups, all of these cool cats were seasoned pros even at this early stage of their retrospective careers and although the music itself is fairly standard for the era, these guys pretty much animated it like very few could and it has always utterly amazed me how brilliant MILES DAVIS really was even from the very beginning. All one has to do is compare a forgotten jazz musician from the same era and the difference in talent is staggering. The album created a bit of controversy in later years with DAVIS claiming credit for the two compositions "Four" and "Tune Up" however jump blues singer and saxophonist Eddie Vinson claimed that the tunes were indeed his and he did not give DAVIS permission to record them. The dispute was ultimately solved by giving equal credit.

This stage of DAVIS' career showcases the time when he began to emerge as the creative tour de force that would quickly dominate the world of jazz in the late 50s and not let up well into the 1970s. Weening himself off of the Dizzy Gillespie mentored influences that propelled him into the limelight, DAVIS blossomed as a composer with several originally crafted tracks including "Smooch," "Miles Ahead" and the title track. Even at this stage DAVIS was dreaming up the world of cool jazz with a more relaxed take on the oft frenetic approach many hard boppers took. Heath's bass lines are particular laid back and the overall vibe of this collection of tracks is fairly mellow which belies the amazing monstrous performances of some of the members' future recordings.

As far as i'm concerned, every DAVIS album is essential but for those only into the absolute classics or the jazz-fusion era then this one is obviously of less importance as it is a fairly standard affair of the day even if DAVIS was beginning to strut an original streak that would only keep its momentum until his creative prowess reached full potential on albums like 1957's "Round About Midnight" and "Cookin'." This is the type of jazz that makes great dinner music or when you really aren't in the mood for something that's overly complex and bombastic. A brilliantly played album with less than brilliantly composed compositions but what a pleasant stroll down cool bop alley this is. While not his creative peak, it's always fun to dive back into DAVIS's earliest recordings to experience that early innocence before he was the king of this craft.

3.5 rounded down

 Milestones by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1958
4.17 | 187 ratings

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Milestones
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by JakeTheGuitar2004

5 stars This here is one of the greatest Jazz albums ever made, and it should also be up there along with Kind Of Blue. This is really incredible with the amazing lineup of John Coltrane & Cannonball Adderly really pair well together as being to absolutely phenomenal virtuosos & they are both all over the place. With Miles being in the centre of the band and really controlling the music and intense Jazz improvisation it shows the brilliance of Davis using those musicians to create new forms of music, & he can do this because of confusing those musicians and then throwing them into those situations they do new and exciting things which happens on this masterpiece here.
 Dark Magus by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 1974
4.65 | 90 ratings

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Dark Magus
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by WJA-K

5 stars I struggled with this one. For the longest time, I didn't feel equipped to say anything about this album. My life has been all about rock and pop. I only started to listen to Jazz close to my 30s and then only sparingly.

But I decided I could say something about this album. How I feel about it and how I experience it. It boggles my mind that Miles and his band played this as an improvisation from start to end. It makes it only more special to know how unprepared Miles Davis was. Here they are. Pushing the boundaries of music off the cuff.

I only came across this album 50 years later, through Progarchives. For weeks, it is the only record I play and I discover something new every time. From the beginning right until the frantic end.

 Decoy by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1984
2.64 | 53 ratings

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Decoy
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Boi_da_boi_124

3 stars Review #151!

Yeah, it's cheap, yeah, it's corny, yeah it's 80's as all hell, but there's some absurd charm about this record that is keeping me from giving this record two stars. The 80's production I can barely see myself through, but once I can garner the courage to continue listening, I see the same Miles that made Bitches Brew and IASW, and I'm in. The title track is most likely my favorite on the album. It's essentially one big trumpet improvisation over fake bass and gaded reverb drums. Robot 415 is too short to say anything about but has its fair share of complexity for being only a minute long. Code M.D is beyond saving though. I often find myself going on my computer when this song is playing, because I just can't stand the synth drums. 'Freaky Deaky' is maybe the most organic song on the album, calling back to albums like Big Fun and Get Up With It. It is ethereal and takes its time, which I respect. 'What It Is' is another doozy. The musicianship is great, but it's just too artificial. Sorry, Miles. 'That's Right' is another bummer with the same issue as the song that preceded it. Sad, because usually, an eleven-minute jazz track is great. 'That's What Happened' I love, and for no reason. It's extremely fake and way too fast, but I like it. This album is not too much of a decoy. It has its fair share of real Miles Davis charm, but overall, not something that anyone needs to hear if they're not interested. Keep funking!

 In A Silent Way by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1969
4.28 | 862 ratings

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In A Silent Way
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Boi_da_boi_124

5 stars Review #99!

Miles Davis's 'In A Silent Way' is a beautiful little jazz album with something for all prog lovers to enjoy. It paved the way for Jazz Fusion artists and albums to come, like Frank Zappa and 'Hot Rats', Herbie Hancock (who played piano on this LP) and 'Mwandishi', and even future Miles Davis, like with the following 'Bitches Brew'. The album starts with 'Shhh/Peaceful', a sidelong, multi-part jazz freakout. There are many amazing parts in this song. Stellar percussion and horns. The opening melody repeats at some point, reestablishing the song's mood. 'In A Silent Way/It's About That Time' opens beautifully, with soft electric guitar and chiming percussion. The saxophone takes over the stage, continuing this enchanting melody. Then, out of nowhere, the song explodes into a short-lived funky saxophone solo. The percussion builds for a long time, creating anticipation in the listener. Then a guitar comes on and so forth and so forth. What an album! Every piece so powerful, every solo so meaningful! Miles would have still had an amazing discography even if he just stopped here. Prog on.

 At Newport 1958 by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 2001
3.56 | 18 ratings

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At Newport 1958
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars A splendid album with astonishing fierce numbers but also some lighter piano-led parts. The music is dominated by the saxophones and the trumpet. It's interesting to hear Evans live in this setting and his contrast introspective playing compared to the "black" maestros. I like Miles' playing in particular, a lot of expression and dexterity. Pity that the concert is so short. Recommended to all who like the cool and bop Miles period. At this point of time, don't expect any innovative elements here. Until recently, Jimmy Cobb was the only surviving members of this line-up. For proggers and fusioners , the 60's Miles output may be more admirable.
 Kind of Blue by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1959
4.36 | 1221 ratings

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Kind of Blue
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by Maw The Void

5 stars Miles Davis - Kind Of Blue

Yeah uhm, I mean there's no way you can't give this five stars. One of the most influential and *essential* jazz albums of all time. It is a cornerstone of the multiple genres it encapsulates. Miles Davis, being a master both in technique and composition, had already made multiple master works and would later make many others, but for sure none as iconic as Kind Of Blue.

If you're into jazz this record shouldn't be hard to get into at all. If you're not into jazz, then I highly recommend you to check this album with an open mind. Track structure can sometimes (to mean mostly) be very abstract and inaccessible.

 The Miles Davis Quintet: Steamin' by DAVIS, MILES album cover Studio Album, 1961
3.94 | 75 ratings

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The Miles Davis Quintet: Steamin'
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by sgtpepper

3 stars One of the couple of 1956 excellent albums with the first classic quintet including Coltrane, this is, just like the other four collections, very impressive collection first and foremost due to playing, in absence of any original material.

Brass instruments lead the pack with excellent melodies and soloing, piano is more subdued and atmospheric. Davis excells at lyrical playing such as in "Something I dreamed last night" and "When I fall in love" but equally love highly energetic pieces including old standard "Salt peanuts" with all players getting loose but mainly the drummer hitting everywhere in his solo. This is a balanced album that will mainly attract jazz fans and less likely prog fans.

 Pangaea by DAVIS, MILES album cover Live, 1975
4.24 | 87 ratings

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Pangaea
Miles Davis Jazz Rock/Fusion

Review by pedestrian

2 stars While I consider "In a Silent Way" and "Bitches Brew" to be among mankind's greatest achievements, the all-out guitar-heavy fusion towards the end of this leg of Davis' career appeals far less. I find Pangaea to be generally overrated, I'm afraid. There are two tracks, which funnily could only be enjoyed (?) in their intended form when released on CD in 1985 (or rather: when people got CD players a bit later than that).

I'm a sucker for long, slowly developing works that ebb and flow, but these two tracks simply fail to keep me interested. For much of the time there is so very little happening, the rhythm section just going on and on to a single chord interspersed with loooong solos on top. Instead of dynamically drifting from one part to another the music tends to suddenly stop dead, then get going again in another tempo. It's such a contrast to, say, "Shhh/peaceful" on "in a silent way", which superficially is equally simple, but with a constant, bubbling stream of ideas bubbling under the surface. Here, below the simple surface I find largely emptiness.

To me much of Pangaea sounds like a hugely overqualified rock band which doesn't know when to stop jamming. OK, that's too harsh -- there are great moments here if you have the patience. But the Davis discography is vast, and life is short, so I'll listen to the (live tracks of) Live Evil or something next time.

Thanks to alucard for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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