Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

The Alan Parsons Project picture
The Alan Parsons Project biography
Formed in 1975 - Somehow active until 1990 (last record release in 1987)

The ALAN PARSONS PROJECT is a "project" of acclaimed English producer Alan PARSONS, best known for his works with The BEATLES's "Abbey Road" and PINK FLOYD's "Dark Side of the Moon". Along with songwriter Eric WOOLFSON, PARSONS created a series of 10 (and counting) albums of progressive rock, employing a rotating cast of session musicians to do most of the performing. (PARSONS does play keyboard and sings on some tracks.). He creates the concept, writes some of the music and hires the artists, while WOOLFSON writes the lyrics, some of the music and sings on many tracks. Additionally, Andrew POWEL joined the project in 1976 as musical arranger.

"Tales of Mystery and Imagination" (1975): The theme of this album is inspired by he works of Edgar Allen Poe.
"I Robot" (1977): The story of the rise of machine and the decline of man, which paradoxically coincided with his discovery of the wheel.
"Pyramid" (1978): "Pyramid" examined the power of ancient myths.
"Eve" (1979): "You can't live with them. You can't live without them."
"The Turn of a Friendly Card" (1980): "a reflection of something that was going on in my subconscious. It's tied up with Monte Carlo, gambling there and taking risks generally."
"Eye in the Sky" (1982): "a cautionary tale about the loss of individualism."
"Ammonia Avenue" (1984): The title track was inspired in part by a Petro-Chemical plant in Middlesborough, England.
"Vulture Culture" (1984): "an unsparing look at modern society, at contemporary relationships and the business of popular culture."
"Stereotomy (1985)": The word Stereotomy comes from Poe's "The Murders in the Rue Morgue".
"Gaudi" (1987): This album was inspired by the life and works of Antonio Gaudi (1852-1926), a Catalan architect whose grand conception, The Sagrada Familia Cathedral in Barcelona.
"Freudiana" (1990): PARSONS and WOOLFSON planned an album called "Freudiana", about the psychiatrist Sigmund Freud.

See also: ALAN PARSONS BAND

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT forum topics / tours, shows & news


THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT forum topics Create a topic now
THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT tours, shows & news
No topics found for : "the alan parsons project"
Post an entries now

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Search and add more videos to THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT

Buy THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Music



More places to buy THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT music online

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.06 | 719 ratings
Tales Of Mystery And Imagination
1976
3.80 | 545 ratings
I Robot
1977
3.42 | 386 ratings
Pyramid
1978
2.75 | 316 ratings
Eve
1979
3.53 | 443 ratings
The Turn Of A Friendly Card
1980
3.36 | 471 ratings
Eye In The Sky
1982
2.99 | 273 ratings
Ammonia Avenue
1984
2.36 | 232 ratings
Vulture Culture
1984
2.77 | 231 ratings
Stereotomy
1985
3.06 | 247 ratings
Gaudi
1987
2.74 | 65 ratings
The Sicilian Defence
2014

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.17 | 11 ratings
Extended Versions
2004
3.93 | 18 ratings
Live In Colombia
2016

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.90 | 10 ratings
Live in Colombia
2016

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.63 | 49 ratings
The Best of Alan Parsons Project
1983
2.84 | 27 ratings
The Best of the Alan Parsons Project Vol. II
1988
2.76 | 33 ratings
The Instrumental Works
1988
4.24 | 8 ratings
Anthology
1991
3.55 | 26 ratings
The Definitive Collection
1997
3.04 | 4 ratings
Works
2002
4.00 | 6 ratings
Anthology
2002
3.33 | 3 ratings
Silence and I: The very Best of
2003
4.11 | 18 ratings
The Essential Alan Parsons Project
2007
5.00 | 1 ratings
The Collection
2010
4.53 | 6 ratings
I Robot (Legacy Edition)
2013
4.50 | 4 ratings
The Complete Albums Collection
2014

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 3 ratings
To One In Paradise
1976
4.09 | 3 ratings
(The System Of) Doctor Tarr And Professor Fether
1976
5.00 | 2 ratings
The Raven
1976
4.08 | 4 ratings
I Wouldn't Want To Be Like You
1977
3.00 | 6 ratings
Hyper-Gamma-Spaces
1978
4.00 | 1 ratings
Pyramania
1978
2.51 | 5 ratings
Lucifer
1979
4.00 | 1 ratings
Damned If I Do
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Lucifer
1979
5.00 | 2 ratings
The Turn of a Friendly Card / May Be a Price to Pay
1980
2.00 | 1 ratings
The Gold Bug / Snake Eyes
1980
5.00 | 2 ratings
Games People Play / The Ace of Swords
1980
3.00 | 5 ratings
An Eye Opener 7'' flexi
1981
3.89 | 9 ratings
Time
1981
3.52 | 14 ratings
Eye In The Sky (single)
1982
4.05 | 3 ratings
Old and Wise
1982
5.00 | 1 ratings
Eye in the Sky / Gemini
1982
4.00 | 1 ratings
Psychobabble
1982
4.00 | 1 ratings
You Don't Believe / Lucifer
1983
4.00 | 1 ratings
Prime Time
1984
2.05 | 2 ratings
Days Are Numbers
1984
3.14 | 7 ratings
Let's Talk About Me
1985
5.00 | 1 ratings
Stereotomy
1985
4.00 | 1 ratings
La Sagrada Familia
1986
5.00 | 1 ratings
Standing On Higher Ground
1986

THE ALAN PARSONS PROJECT Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Days Are Numbers by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1984
2.05 | 2 ratings

BUY
Days Are Numbers
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars I've actually never listened to this single's source album Vulture Culture (1984) in its entirety, but several tracks have become familiar from e.g. compilations. A trivial fact I didn't know is that originally Ammonia Avenue (1983) and Vulture Culture were thought to form a double album. As commercial as their material is, it hardly would have been a good idea in any sense. After the decision to make Vulture Culture an individual album, Alan Parsons gave it a more modern (for the time) treatment, which results for example as harder hitting drums (*sigh*). At least here on PA Vulture Culture is considered the weakest album of the Project. It's also the only one not to feature any orchestrations of Andrew Powell. This single gives a clear, representative idea of Vulture Culture.

'Days Are Numbers (The Traveller)' is a soft and a bit syrupy ballad from the Parsons-Woolfson assembly line. Chris Rainbow's lead vocals are nicely backed up with harmonies, and the song's very hummable melodies are not plain bad, but also sonically this tender pop ballad is far from the finest Alan Parsons touch as a producer and engineer. The saxophone addition finishes the cheesiness. Of course compared to much of the mid-80's commercial pop, this still is pretty fine and sophisticated.

'Somebody Out There', another Vulture Culture track, I hadn't heard before. That it's sung by Colin Blunstone, the ex- Zombie whose voice graces many beautiful APP songs such as 'The Eagle Will Rise Again' and 'Old and Wise', made me expect more of it. Well, his vocal contribution is just average here, and the song itself is, after the fairly promising beginning, dead boring in its "dramatic" pop hit approach. And those sharp, cheap synth sounds, they're something that never should have come out from Parsons' hands. A disappointment.

 I Robot by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.80 | 545 ratings

BUY
I Robot
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars I Robot is Alan Parsons Project's 2nd album. Like their first album, I Robot was originally going to be based around the stories of another famous author, this time being Isaac Asimov. That's how it was conceived originally at least. Asimov was even going to be a part of the album, reading certain selections throughout the album. The songs were going to be based upon scenes from the series. Asimov was actually quite excited about participating. However, that plan unfortunately got squashed. Whether it was Parsons or the record label that discouraged that idea is unclear. What we ended up with instead is a loosely based concept with songs about robots in general, not the sci-fi universe of Asimov. This is really too bad because we probably would have ended up with an amazing album like their debut album "Tales of Mystery and Imagination" was.

However, the end result was still pretty good. Yes the prog ended up being quite lite compared to the previous album, but it still managed to be excellently produced with a pristine sound and a good variety of songs. The things that did stay consistent with their debut album is that the songs were sung by several different vocalists (this, of course, would be the usual formula for The APP), there were a couple of instrumental tracks, and the music was high quality. Yet, the album would also feature more accessible music and no epic tracks. There would be a more minimal use of orchestra this time, but there would also be more use of two chorale style groups.

"I Robot" is one of the band's best instrumentals and utilizes The English Chorale to give it an effectively sweeping sound. It does somewhat harken back to the atmospheric feel of "The Raven" from the debut album. This is followed with a somewhat mediocre track "I Wouldn't Want to Be Like You" which was released as a single, but "Some Other Time" is a bit better and also reflects the sound that fans would fall in love with, a slower ballad with a nice symphonic feel. Even though "Breakdown" wasn't released as a single, it still managed to become the most famous song on the album, and rightfully so as it is a heavier rocker, though it doesn't approach the heaviness of "Dr Tarr & Professor Feather" from the previous album. The use of the choir at the end of "Breakdown" is an excellent touch and really helps with the final payoff of the track. "Don't Let it Show" is a nice ballad, but feels a bit schmaltzy, but it's still nice to hear once in a while.

"The Voice" is another of the best tracks on the album, and probably the closest thing to a progressive rock track on the album with the dark feel during the verses and the sudden change in tempo and meter with the addition of orchestra in the rousing middle section. "Nucleus" is a nice, atmospheric and mostly electronic instrumental that sounds a bit futuristic. "Day After Day (The Show Must Go On)" is a much more satisfying ballad which might remind you a bit of the band's big hit "Time" that would come a few years later. That segues into the most experimental track on the album "Total Eclipse" which is a thick, dark and dissonant wordless chorale piece with orchestra done again by The English Chorale. This one is very spooky and almost disturbing with it's strong dissonant sung chords and ominous orchestra and tense atmosphere. This finally resolves into the lovely (mostly) instrumental epilogue "Genesis Ch. 1 V. 32" which ends with a melodic theme accented by The New Philharmonia Chorus and ends the album with a nice, yet satisfying ending.

This album wins more because of the production and the overall layout of the tracks and the presentation of the material. Yes, it might not be strong with the progressive aspect, but it is still a favorite of mine. The album would end up inspiring other bands to explore art-pop. It would also be a template for many APP albums to come. In the end, you can hear the quality of the production that also has some echoes of "Dark Side of the Moon" which Parsons helped with earlier. This is still an album that I consider essential at least for my own record collection even if it doesn't reach the heights of the projects first album.

 I Robot by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Studio Album, 1977
3.80 | 545 ratings

BUY
I Robot
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by progtime1234567

4 stars I Robot comes from the short story collection of the same name by science-fiction grandmaster Isaac Asimov. This is what caught my attention with this album, and this band. The Alan Parsons Project isn't as much of a band as it is a collective of musicians who come together to record music. Alan Parsons is pretty much the mastermind, playing only a few instruments and singing on a few songs on his albums he conceives. With I Robot, good, clean progressive and art rock was created.

The concept of the album has nothing to do with the short stories written by Asimov in his book I, Robot. The idea revolves around robots in general than characters and plot points in Asimov's universe. The music sounds more like art rock than progressive rock in my opinion but to some people progressive rock and art rock are the same thing. All the different musicians add their own sound to the album, keeping it from being repetitive and keeping it from having all the songs sound the same.

The Alan Parsons Project is a band I want to dive deeper into. Isaac Asimov is one of my favorite authors, and the whole idea behind the band, or collective in general is very interesting. They also have an album about Edgar Allan Poe's stuff, this band was destined for me. I Robot is a great album and it was a good start for me for this band. I still expected more synthesizers, it's called I Robot!

 I Robot (Legacy Edition) by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2013
4.53 | 6 ratings

BUY
I Robot (Legacy Edition)
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

5 stars I just can't see the point with the bonus material added to this and other releases by The Project. To me, they sound like incomplete, unfinished or failed parts discarded in the final assembly of the real songs. The album itself is, of course, a whole different matter.

And perfection is the name. The combination of electronics with choral eeriness in the opener reaches fantastic levels of depth, contrast and pristine clearness with this upgrade in sound quality. The vocals by Lenny Zakatek and the funky touch by the Tosh & Patton rythm section needs no introduccion really, let's just say that they shine brightly, for example, in "I Wouldn't Want To Be Like You". If you are looking for heavy choral architecture, but in a truly epic scale, go for "Breakdown". Are you into the contemporary-classical stuff, with a penchant for experimentation & atonalism? Just listen to "Total Eclipse", so reminiscent of Gyorgy Ligeti, that you will be searching for a black monolith to adore, in a second.

Yes, the same, but even better.

 Old and Wise by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1982
4.05 | 3 ratings

BUY
Old and Wise
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Project's sixth album Eye in the Sky (1982) is a pretty enjoyable soft rock release with only a little bit of prog elements, and its last track 'Old and Wise' is the only single by The Alan Parsons Project to feature the lead vocals of Colin Blunstone. This beautiful-voiced former vocalist of The Zombies had sung on the very lovely APP song 'The Eagle Will Rise Again' (Pyramid, 1978) and would appear also on the albums Ammonia Avenue (1984) and Vulture Culture (1985). By the way, an early version, without orchestration or the saxophone solo, was sung by Eric Woolfson and is included as a bonus on the 2007 remastered edition of Eye in the Sky.

The song is very mellow and romantic. Some will undoubtedly find it syrupy, but to me it has become a fond classic, or should I say everGREEN. Not that I would listen to it regularly, instead it often starts playing in my *head* when I'm riding my bicycle in a beautiful surrounding with trees and grass. I must have developed this Pavlovian music memory nearly 30 years ago as a young student amidst his (mostly long-distance) first love -- and first heartache. I used to play cassettes in a Walkman on a beautiful lakeside park route from university to my tiny room. I guess I felt the song and its lyrics strongly at that time.

Also the B side comes from Eye in the Sky: 'Children of the Moon' is a brighter, not so deeply emotional song with lead vocals of the bassist David Paton. Another good and accessible pop song from The AP Project.

 Lucifer by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1979
2.51 | 5 ratings

BUY
Lucifer
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Luciferama

Lucifer is the instrumental track that opens the poor Eve album. The track itself is not bad however and is by far the best that album has to offer. It was also released as a single to promote the album, and it works well in this format. I have a liking for instrumental singles.

The single version is an edit, but nothing is really lost in my opinion. To the contrary, this is one of those rare occasions when less really is more. The shorter version is more direct and does not overstay its welcome.

The b-side is I'd Rather Be a Man, also taken from the forgettable Eve album. Frankly, I'd rather listen to Lucifer on repeat than to hear anything else from Eve again.

 Hyper-Gamma-Spaces by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1978
3.00 | 6 ratings

BUY
Hyper-Gamma-Spaces
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by SouthSideoftheSky
Special Collaborator Symphonic Team

3 stars Top of the pyramid

I have always found that the most interesting parts by far of any Alan Parsons Project album are the instrumental tracks. Recently I have revisited some of these instrumentals with fresh ears, mainly because I have become a big fan of keyboard player Duncan Mackay who contributed to some of the Project's early albums as a session man. I suppose I didn't pay much attention to the synthesiser-driven Hyper-Gamma-Spaces before, hidden away as it is towards the end of the weak Pyramid album, but this track has now become a bit of a favourite of mine. I usually don't rate singles unless they offer something different from what can be found on a full-length album, but I will make an exception on this occasion as I think Hyper-Gamma-Spaces stands out as single, and is a lot more interesting than the dull album from which it is taken.

The version of this single listed here has The Eagle Will Rise Again as its B-side, a boring vocal track also taken from Pyramid that frankly does nothing for me. Other versions has other tracks as B-sides, including the awful Pyramania and in some cases In the Lap of the Gods. The latter is another instrumental that is far behind Hyper-Gamma-Spaces in quality but still the best choice I suppose.

 To One In Paradise by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1976
5.00 | 3 ratings

BUY
To One In Paradise
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by HarmonyDissonan

5 stars A GORGEOUS SONG AND A CHILLER!

Hi. First I would have to say that I agree with MATTI's review. But I would personally add that To One In Paradise is a favorite of mine. Just an out and out gorgeous song with hauntingly beautiful lyrics. One of the stand out lines, among many for me would be the lines, 'I've been through times when no one cared, I've seen clouds in empty skies, When one kind word meant more to me, Than all the love in Paradise.' As the sometimes coolness of religious dogma can't compete with the down-to-earth love contained within the human touch generated in it's most basic form of kind words. Without a doubt it is my favorite Alan Parsons Project song, but also my second favorite 'mellow' popular song ever. My favorite mellow tune is by someone who isn't represented on PA, the song is Gypsy Soul from Tommy Bolin's album Private Eyes. It is my favorite 'electric' album as well. For anyone interested, my personal favorite 'acoustic' albums are also not represented here on PA either, but all three are great albums worth looking into. The 'acoustic' albums are Al Stewart's Past, Present and Future followed closely by America's debut album.

Well, take care and enjoy God's gift of music.

 To One In Paradise by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1976
5.00 | 3 ratings

BUY
To One In Paradise
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

5 stars When rating singles, I've often had certain criteria for the full rating: in addition to containing great music, an ideal single has at least one interesting non-album song to increase the release value. Well, both songs on this 7" are taken from The Alan Parsons Project's excellent debut album Tales of Mystery and Imagination, based on the classic horror stories -- and, to a lesser extent, poetry -- of Edgar Allan Poe. But they happen to be my favourite tracks, so I can only give this single five stars!

'To One in Paradise' is a lovely, peaceful and probably generally too forgotten album closer, not directly based on a short story but, if I'm not mistaken, instead featuring some verses of Poe that Leonard Whiting reads at the end of the song. In that sense it lacks the power of the story-telling level that graces most of the album, but it's fully compensated by its beautiful mellowness that so nicely balances the album whole. The main vocalist Terry Sylvester is backed by female backing vocals.

'The Cask of Amontillado'. Wow, goosebumps of pleasure. Of course it helps that I was impressed by the wonderful story already in my youth. Definitely among the finest Poe wrote. "By the last breath of the four winds that blow / I'll have revenge upon Fortunato. / Smile in his face, I'll say 'Come let us go / I've a cask of Amontillado'..." The suspense of this horrifying story of revenge is wonderfully captured by the dual vocals, deceitfully calm on the surface, and the more intensive instrumental sections featuring Hitchcockian strings. John Miles as the protagonist who chains his fellow in the wine cellar is actually my all time favourite AP Project vocalist (his other highlight performances include 'Shadow of a Lonely Man' on Pyramid, 1978).

If you haven't yet listened to Tales of Mystery and Imagination, take this review as a suggestion to do so. And if you enjoy short stories, I also advice you to find a selection of Poe's stories.

 The Best of Alan Parsons Project by PARSONS PROJECT, THE ALAN album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1983
2.63 | 49 ratings

BUY
The Best of Alan Parsons Project
The Alan Parsons Project Crossover Prog

Review by OLD PROG

4 stars After 6 studio albums released by Arista It's the time of "The Best Of Alan Parsons project", a good compilation. First of all, it must be said that the style is a sort of truly intriguing Progressive POP because the writing is fresh and engaging. There are no virtuosity or moments when the phrase "look how I'm great to play" comes to mind. This is due to the fact that the songs seek more the pleasure of listening.

This compilation is really well done. It has no tired moments or fillers. Rightly "I Wouldn't Want To Be Like You" is put at the beginning, being a little funky and contrasts with "Eye In The Sky" which follows because the latter is very sweet, like sound and atmosphere. "Games People Play", the thid song, it is, instead, a more Rock and almost not Progressive piece (and not much Art Rock). The rest of the compilation is all about these frequencies. It's therefore very interesting because it's made up of excellent compositions.

In short, the Alan parsons Project were a band that created atmospheres, rather than viruosity (otherwise absent) to conquer the listener. Alan Parson, history says so, is an extraordinary producer and engineer. In this sense he is very good at amplifying the emotional part of the songs. And, with a band that plays on emotions, an immortal mix was born

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.