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THE PINEAPPLE THIEF

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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The Pineapple Thief biography
Founded in Yeovil, Somerset, UK in 1999

Bruce SOORD of VULGAR UNICORN starts his solo career with this band, which is inspired as much by PORCUPINE TREE as by his old group. PINEAPPLE THIEF has a mix of prog with some space rock. Balance, beauty, and modernity are all to be found in the plush sounds of PINEAPPLE THIEF ... great melodies, songs and plenty of atmospheres. This band will appeal to fans of RADIOHEAD, but other occasional influences show through that are less obvious but apparent (PINK FLOYD, U2, OZRICS and KING CRIMSON).

With their second release, PINEAPPLE THIEF (PTh for short) have reached a state of grace with their frenzy guitar drawings and acoustic sets, using Mellotron to the better effect without ever sounding retro. Indeed, and more than with the two previous albums from PINEAPPLE THIEF, "Variations on a Dream" is brimming over with its creator's talent and is impressive with its incredible commercial potential. Thus, PTh has elaborated a "double layer album", in which the prog fan will enjoy the fine-tuned production and the arrangements, while the pop rock lovers will be delighted with accessible and addictive songs. This is the type of CD that one plays over again as soon as it ends. A little miracle of balance, and a place in my Top 5 for 2003.

Highly Recommended..!

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THE PINEAPPLE THIEF discography


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THE PINEAPPLE THIEF top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.38 | 94 ratings
Abducting the Unicorn [Aka: Abducted at Birth]
1999
3.26 | 96 ratings
137 [Aka: One Three Seven]
2002
3.25 | 169 ratings
Variations On A Dream
2003
2.53 | 62 ratings
12 Stories Down
2004
3.32 | 111 ratings
10 Stories Down
2005
3.77 | 182 ratings
Little Man
2006
3.87 | 252 ratings
What We Have Sown
2007
3.67 | 227 ratings
Tightly Unwound
2008
3.57 | 287 ratings
Someone Here Is Missing
2010
3.70 | 202 ratings
All The Wars
2012
3.65 | 201 ratings
Magnolia
2014
3.93 | 326 ratings
Your Wilderness
2016
3.97 | 291 ratings
Dissolution
2018
3.60 | 126 ratings
Versions of the Truth
2020
3.61 | 23 ratings
Give It Back
2022

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.60 | 5 ratings
Live 2003
2003
3.57 | 14 ratings
Someone Here Is Live
2010
4.25 | 12 ratings
Live At The 013
2013
4.09 | 11 ratings
Live 2014
2015
3.99 | 38 ratings
Where We Stood
2017
3.92 | 12 ratings
Hold Our Fire
2019
4.03 | 25 ratings
Nothing but the Truth
2021

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.96 | 55 ratings
3000 Days
2009
3.29 | 9 ratings
Introducing ...The Pineapple Thief
2014

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

5.00 | 1 ratings
Sherbet Gods
2000
3.84 | 10 ratings
4 Stories Down
2005
5.00 | 1 ratings
Limited Edition Free CD
2006
4.29 | 17 ratings
Shoot first
2008
3.90 | 29 ratings
The Dawn Raids (Part 1)
2009
3.85 | 27 ratings
The Dawn Raids (Part Two)
2009
3.61 | 18 ratings
Show A Little Love
2010
4.60 | 5 ratings
Nothing At Best
2010
3.96 | 24 ratings
Build A World
2013

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 What We Have Sown by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.87 | 252 ratings

BUY
What We Have Sown
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by Dapper~Blueberries

4 stars Lemme tell you about the birds and the bees. When a mommy Radiohead and a daddy Porcupine Tree love each other very much they have a Pineapple Thief. Jokes aside, The Pineapple Thief has got to be one of the most interesting bands I have come across due to them sounding like two different bands at the same time and seemingly executing it very well. So far they've released a good number of albums, all of which aren't half bad at all, heck some I might say are dang near amazing. One such album that I think is near the point of being called amazing is What We Have Sown. At this time they had a few songs that were in the vault if you'd say, some were made before this album's conception and was meant to be a love letter to their old label, Cyclops Records before switching to Kscope. Despite the fact these songs were written before, this album feels as original as ever, and that goes hand in hand with the songs found on this release.

The first song is All You Need to Know. Right off the bat you hear the band's more progressive aspect in the mellotron, which distinctly sounds like one Genesis or King Crimson would use with some nice acoustic playing in the back. In the first few minutes you hear some great distinction in the melodies and instruments that you never really see in many bands, especially those that sort combine two styles from two completely different bands. I definitely think they really honed in on what really worked in this style of music and really made it their own, which they had been doing ever since their second release of 137, but here it is extremely present on how good they can be in this sort of style of progressive rock. It's a great song that is both fun in its music and instrumentation, but heavy in its more depressive lyrics.

Next up is Well, I Think That's What You Said? I'd say if the last song was a grand fusion of Radiohead and Porcupine Tree, then this song is more reliant on the Radiohead side. I am definitely getting a lot of Ok Computer and The Bends vibes from this song, lots of technically interesting playing going around here, but the singing is very in tune with that of Thom Yorke's, obviously a little less high pitched. To be honest this is a weaker song on this album due to how it sort of relies on that sound Radiohead did in the 80s and then stopped doing when the 2000s rolled in, but there is still a lot to love on this song, like the drumming. Keith Harrison doesn't utilize a 4/4 beat but rather a (I think) 9/8 beat, which really creates a sort of interesting aspect this song brings to the table, cause it's a bit more pop in nature, but is definitely clearly utilizing and creating something progressive, or alternative. Definitely an interesting song despite its weakness.

Then we get Take Me With You. Now I have been really hammering in the band comparisons to The Pineapple Thief, I mean how could I really not, the singer and guitarist Bruce Soord was inspired by Porcupine Tree for basically the entire history of this band, but likewise so was Steve Wilson with bands like King Crimson or more so, Pink Floyd, which man, this song has a ton of that chill rock Pink Floyd energy. I guess influential Prog bands that start with P have this effect of making really strong slow chill tracks. Anywho, this song has some amazing acoustic work. Very moody in the guitar that goes hand in hand to that very delicate but raw bass playing. This song is just a very amazing moody song that does get a tiny bit experimental to the end. Not too much as to where it basically flips the song on its head, but definitely one where it's a bit unexpected and sorta throws you through a loop.

Next on the track list is West Winds. This is an instrumental track that shows a more experimental side of the band. The use of instruments create this almost foreboding atmosphere in the music, like a hero realizing the villain has got the upper hand and is now losing a battle. That is sorta what this song feels like. A lot of intense drumming and guitar work, not to where it turns to metal, but think of it as a more post rocky type of heavy where you sorta feel it in your head and gut. I get some small Godspeed You! Black Emperor and Mogwai vibes from this song. It's nicely done and gives a lot more atmosphere to this album.

Next song is Deep Blue World. This is a mostly acoustic song with drumming only coming in towards the end. It's very elegant in how it is played. The acoustic and the singing really give off this somber vibe through the song. Plus the violin work makes this song almost gives this song a sort of old Prog vibe as well, like almost a I Talk To The Wind feel where it's super somber but also very pretty. I do however feel the drumming at the end was very unnecessary and just slapped on for filler really. Honestly this track would be so much better without that ending with the drums. I get leaving a track with an ending of sorts, but many acoustic songs, whether they are pop or alt, work well without drums since they aren't needed with drums most of the time, and if you are going for a beat, maybe make it a bit more tribal sounding like on Biko by Peter Gabriel. It's definitely a more minute thing, but the song would be so much without it that I gotta address it.

And now the last song, the big 27 minute epic. What Have We Sown? Despite being Prog, The Pineapple Thief isn't really a band known for their epics. They are more of the shorter song band where their shorter works stand out, as opposed to their longer ones. I am not saying they can't craft a long song, obviously they can, but when I think of The Pineapple Thief, I think more so on their single digit minute songs that are more 1-9 minutes long, as opposed to songs like this that take a whole side on a record. Besides that, this song is actually pretty nice. It goes more towards an industrial rock sound, as opposed to a more softer rock style, giving this song a more metal flair to it. You can tell some industrial rock groups they probably saw inspired a lot of this song, and I think it works well with the sound the band usually has, while being different enough to where it's distinct. But as I said before, they are not a band that relies off of epics like many modern Prog bands do, because this song doesn't really have that epic ending where you feel like you've just gone through a wild journey. It definitely does have something of an ending but even their shorter songs have more grand endings than this. Despite all of that, it's definitely worth your time and can be a fun song to hear once in a while if I am being perfectly honest. A good closer to a great album.

So while not perfect, this album definitely gives a ton of great songs to enjoy, and I never feel as if my time gets wasted whenever I hear this album. I'd say give this release and basically the entirety of The Pineapple Thief a shot if you like the styles of Porcupine Tree and Radiohead.

 Variations On A Dream by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 2003
3.25 | 169 ratings

BUY
Variations On A Dream
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by The Crow
Prog Reviewer

3 stars "Variations on a Dream" was an important album for Bruce Soord since he managed to open his fan base back in 2003.

In addition, here we finally hear a more personal style, differentiating itself from its obvious influences given by Radiohead and Porcupine Tree.

Unfortunately, the fact that it is a double disc plays against it, since although it has absolutely brilliant songs, especially in its first part, there are also many filler songs on the second one, which is also much less progressive and not very interesting for fans of the genre.

However, for my taste it is the best release from the first stage of The Pineapple Thief before definitively establishing themselves as a band on their next album "10 Stories Down".

Recommended, without a doubt!

Best Tracks: We Subside (some beautiful guitars), Vapour Trails (long, slow-burn but yet emotional track), The Bitter Pill (wonderful vocal melodies), Part Zero (a track that can compete in quality with the best songs of his recent albums, and which is without a doubt the highlight on "Variations on a Dream". The guitar solo is absolutely amazing!), Remember Us (just like Vapour Trails, it's a song that reminds us of the first two albums of the long and intense band, with a very atmospheric and sad interlude)

My Rating: ***

 137 [Aka: One Three Seven] by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 2002
3.26 | 96 ratings

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137 [Aka: One Three Seven]
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by The Crow
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Bruce Soord's second album under the name of The Pineapple Thief, before they really constituted themselves as a band on their third album, offers us a more interesting and homogeneous work than the debut "Abducting the Unicorn"

However, he can be blamed for the shadow of Porcupine Tree and Radiohead being even longer here. Nevertheless, Soord's genius saves him from being a plagiarist with enough ideas to make the result fresh, interesting and diverse enough to support repeated plays.

It's a shame that "137" is such a forgotten piece of work, since songs like Doppler or the one that gives the album its title are compositions to remember. Too bad the number of filler songs doesn't let this "137" reach higher levels, despite being clearly better than its predecessor!

Best Tracks: Kid Chameleon (good work of synthesizers and guitars), Doppler (maybe the best song of the first stage of the group, a preview of what Soord would actually be capable to do in the future) and Pvs (another long track, with great keyboards at the beginning and very good guitars arrangements)

My Rating: ***

 Abducting the Unicorn [Aka: Abducted at Birth] by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 1999
3.38 | 94 ratings

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Abducting the Unicorn [Aka: Abducted at Birth]
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by The Crow
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Nowadays, it is not at all unreasonable to say that Bruce Soord is one of the main British minds dedicated to progressive music.

And the meteoric trajectory that he has taken with The Pineapple Thief in the last years is nothing but a confirmation of this fact. What began as a side project while he acted as a guitarist in Vulgar Unicorn, has become a band capable of extensive international tours and that counts among its ranks one of the best drummers of all time.

However, in "Abducted at Birth", as happened with Porcupine Tree in its beginnings, we have an album in which Soord acts as a one-man band, which, although it gives us really brilliant moments, still suffers from a lack of maturity and the weight that The Pineapple Thief currently possesses.

In any case, all fans of 90's British prog (especially Porcupine Tree) will surely enjoy this debut that, although it falls behind Soord's best works, is a remarkable one.

Best Tracks: Private Paradise (long but fun, and excellent guitar work towards the end), Drain (intense and with a great chorus) No One Leaves this Earth (good instrumental in the vein of Up the Downstairs) and Parted Forever (Soord proves here again that apart from being a talented songwriter, he is also a great guitar player)

My Rating: ***

 Versions of the Truth by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.60 | 126 ratings

BUY
Versions of the Truth
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars It's rare for me to go into a band's latest studio album having already heard most of it from their most recent live record but that was the case here. I knew six of these songs because of the live "Nothing But The Truth" so the love for this was immediate. Sure hearing this band's new sound on that live one was actually unsettling at first, too commercial sounding at times but man I became addicted to these songs very quickly. I'm pretty much a fanboy here so take that into consideration but this is a strong 4 star album in my world. Soord is a master lyricist and Gavin Harrison helps in that regard here along with being one of the greatest drummers on this earth.

The first two tracks "Versions Of The Truth" and "Break It All" opened and closed disc one of "Nothing But The Truth" and what a way to get the album rolling. "Break It All" is a top three in particular with Harrison impressing around 2 1/2 minutes. Some powerful music here. "Demons" is so uplifting at times as the sound drifts and the next one "Driving Like Maniacs" is a favourite of mine and I'm glad the live recording has them back to back as well.

"Leave Me Be" is pretty intense at times in a TPT manner. Check out the bass and organ after 3 minutes. "Our Mire" has this 80's sound to start before calming right down with vocals. So catchy when it picks up. Love the lyrics too. Uplifting stuff and a top three. Some emotion on "Out Of Line" with those vocals. Love that bass. Restrained with some beautiful guitar after a minute. A top three. I will admit the last two tracks are a little disappointing the album could have ended stronger than this.

Still fighting for this band in 2022 but I am really interested in what is coming next.

 Dissolution by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 2018
3.97 | 291 ratings

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Dissolution
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Pineapple Thief find themselves triumphant on their electrifying 2018 art rock achievement 'Dissolution', the band's twelfth studio album, released on Kscope. This exciting British band has been a synonym for quality in the last decade, becoming one of the most respected bands whose music gently crosses over alternative rock and progressive rock in a very contemporary and welcoming fashion, occasionally coming close to the sensibility and aura left by Porcupine Tree the previous decade, allowing a very fine touch of sentimentality to protrude their excellent music, it is 'Dissolution' that might confidently be regarded as the band's best effort so far.

Perhaps one will find the strengths of this record in the band's impressive ability to keep things compact, yet fully expressive in terms of songwriting - the masterful duo of the talents of Bruce Soord and Gavin Harrison graces the sonic portrait of 'Dissolution' with a tender maturity that can be experienced from the very first seconds of the opening track 'Not Naming Any Names'; the strong use of acoustic instruments will go on to mark this album as a very sheltering one. Great songs follow one after another with the melodic 'Try as I Might' coming next, or the cerebrally touching 'Threatening War', a Bruce Soord classic, elevated majestically by the fabulous drumming, the acoustic touch and the soft keyboard soundscapes. The album goes on in the same spirit, giving off the impression that you are immersed in one big continuous piece of music, the coherence of 'Dissolution' is absolutely astonishing; the great production also helps, with the gracious warmth of every nuance of each instrument caressing the listener's ears. It is tracks like 'All That You've Got', 'Far Below', or the grandiose 'White Mist', the 11-minute epic at the end of the record that add up to the unprecedented experience of submerging into the sensitive world that this LP proposes, excellent and flawless from beginning to end.

Certainly one of the highlights of the year and of the decade, this album by The Pineapple Thief is a very melancholic, beautifully-written piece of contemporary art rock, showcasing the talents of a band capable of creating something minimalistic, yet gorgeously warm and welcoming - a really great effort by Bruce Soord and co. that will go down in history as one of the tiny gems of the genre.

 Nothing but the Truth by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Live, 2021
4.03 | 25 ratings

BUY
Nothing but the Truth
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Such a great live album! The Pineapple Thief present a recording of a collection of seventeen of the band's best songs, focusing mainly on material from the last decade, picking the most exciting numbers from albums like 'All the Wars', 'Your Wilderness', the absolutely brilliant 'Dissolution' and their 2020 offering 'Versions of the Truth' ? a very accessible and enjoyable performance (in a crowdless venue, unfortunately), where the band play more convincingly than ever, despite the unusual circumstances.

Bruce Soord and company display a vibrant energy, a very professional approach, and an album that sounds just too well - the show is tremendously well recorded, the listener will be able to experience every little fragment of the music with ease, and immerse entirely in the atmosphere of the performance. Jumping back and forth between newer and now-older compositions, each member deserves a lot of credit for what they are doing, but perhaps the most impressive musicians are the two main forces behind the band - mastermind Bruce Soord and drumming extraordinaire Gavin Harrison, the man who always proves how crucial an excellent drummer can be, and just how much the elegant playing can contribute to the music. Each live rendition of the songs on here is great, some highlights would be 'Versions of the Truth', 'Warm Seas', 'Our Mire', 'White Mist', 'Wretched Soul', and 'Far Below', but this recording is supposed to be experienced in its entirety, and it is really worth it.

 Nothing but the Truth by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Live, 2021
4.03 | 25 ratings

BUY
Nothing but the Truth
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by Mellotron Storm
Prog Reviewer

4 stars I've had quite the journey with this band and with Bruce Soord in particular over the years. One of my earliest reviews on here from 2006 was Bruce's first band VULGAR UNICORN. He created PINEAPPLE THIEF as an artistic outlet combining the style of VULGAR UNICORN with PORCUPINE TREE who he was a fan of. Remember the Cyclops label? I have a couple of sampler cds from them which always included PINEAPPLE THIEF it seems. Now on K-Scope they really have reached their potential in my opinion starting with "Your Wilderness" my favourite from them. It was a little disappointing to see only two songs from "Your Wilderness" on here especially when "All The Wars" an album I'm not big on has two tracks and it's from 2012. We also get one older song in "Wretched Soul" from "10 Stories Down" which is a 2005 recording.

I have to give props to whoever put the packaging together as we get this uniform look throughout the liner notes and front and back covers with that gold and brown motif. It's all so professionally done. I feel Soord is one of the best song writers in Prog and especially in dealing with some of the tragedies in his life, his inspiration for many of his lyrics. But he has a way of writing tasteful lyrics with witty sayings and he has his own style for sure. I like how he often says one thing followed by an opposite saying sometimes twisted but he makes me think. Besides the inspiration he has for his lyrics the addition of Gavin Harrison was huge for the instrumental parts. He added some much needed "life" in my opinion to the point that we have the perfect storm when it comes to this band and "Your Wilderness" was the result.

Honestly I'm just catching up now with the last 4 years of music from 2018 to 2021 as I got a forced break you could say so it's been fun going over the last 4 years and picking up 24 records recently including this one trying to do some catchup. My first thoughts on listening to this recording was how poppy some of this was. Not being familiar with some of the newer songs I was surprised at this direction. Not happy but I must admit after about three listens my opinion changed as I feel I have become addicted to a lot of these tracks. Still I could not go more than 4 stars with the rating despite the absolute highs we get on this double disc. We get seven tracks from "Versions Of The Truth" including the only bonus track on here that's from that album called "The Swell". Three tracks from that record are in my top eight tracks from this live recording including the opener "Versions Of The Truth" with those contrasts. Also "Our Mire" is one I connected with right away and "Break It All" the closer on disc one. The latter reminds me of Steven Wilson. My favourite from disc one is "In Exile" from "Your Wilderness" and the other track I rate highly from this disc is "Build A World" from "All The Wars" and at least we don't have all that orchestration on it like from the studio album.

Disc two isn't as strong in my opinion but my favourite track is the other tune from "Your Wilderness" called "The Final Thing On My Mind" the closer. So freaking good! Still blows me away. The other two tracks from disc two that standout are the opener "White Mist" from "Dissolution" which is so uplifting. This and the closer I just mentioned are the two longest songs by far on this recording. "Threatening War" also from "Dissolution" is my final top 8 track. I love the lyrics.

A solid 4 stars is what this has grown into for me. It's been an interesting week spinning this one and getting back into that PINEAPPLE THIEF mood while doing some catching up.

 Nothing but the Truth by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Live, 2021
4.03 | 25 ratings

BUY
Nothing but the Truth
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by alainPP

4 stars The PINEAPPLE THIEF, known in 2006 after having loved exploring the VULGAR UNICORN; very quickly, I felt a connotation of PORCUPINE TREE with a little space side which suited me well. Often rather short, melodic titles with a few convoluted drawers to thrill the progressive in search of dreams. RADIOHEAD is also often cited, as well as U2 and vintage keyboards reminiscent of PINK FLOYD, in short uncompromising experimental pop-rock rock captured here live to fill the lack of concerts due to Covid. All in 2CD / DVD / 2LP / Blu-ray Limited Deluxe Edition soundtrack at 48kHz / 24-bit and Dolby Atmos, amen. The PINEAPPLE THIEF is heavy.

The last three albums are in sight with "Versions of the Truth" and its atmosphere la Peter GABRIEL for the marimbas; "In Exile" for the atmosphere generated by the featured guitars, their solo and backing vocals; "Warm Seas" of 2012, as time goes by, brought up to date; "Our Mire" on oozing PORCUPINE TREE, on 80's synths, on a devastating solo and the progressive experimental finale, which must really vibrate even more in? live; "Build a World" again from 2012 with a combination of marimba and surly rock riff; "Demons" for the nested vocal harmonies of highly stereophonic deep synthesizers; "Driving Like Maniacs", "Someone Pull Me Out" from 2012 again which passes like a letter in the mail; "Uncovering Your Tracks" for the jerky, teutonic rhythm, the drums and a squirting solo and finally "Break It All" for the end of the 1st CD with a truly progressive incursion from start to finish.

"White Mist" for this atmospheric side to be listened to live there without concession; "Out of Line" for its melancholy imprints; "Wretched Soul" the oldest cover (2005) with a strong rhythm and roaring guitars bordering on spleen; "Far Below" and "Threatening War" for its soothing melodies; "The Swell" the only B-side to be covered; "The Final Thing on My Mind" for the finale with backing guitars and vocals filling all corners of the channels; an ideal slow contemplative, mysterious end to remain silent in front of the white which overwhelms you afterwards.

THE PINEAPPLE THIEF is therefore releasing its 15th album or 7th live? without an audience; an album recorded from every angle to show the extent of their talent and to thrill concert junkies a bit, I am thinking of some friends who are currently missing. An album that reconciles me with them by the quality of the recording, by the number of titles and the involvement of the musicians in giving themselves to make us forget the greatest scourge of humanity at the present time. PINEAPPLE THIEF or the cure for the gloom, there is only one step to take to know if the musical medicine can work. In any case, a group that has been able to forge itself slowly but surely in the art rock crossover universe.

 Versions of the Truth by PINEAPPLE THIEF, THE album cover Studio Album, 2020
3.60 | 126 ratings

BUY
Versions of the Truth
The Pineapple Thief Crossover Prog

Review by A Crimson Mellotron
Prog Reviewer

3 stars British alternative rockers The Pineapple Thief released their thirteenth studio album in September of 2020, some two years after the nearly-perfect 'Dissolution', an album that certainly cemented them as one of the most interesting progressive bands of the 2010s. 'Versions of the Truth' happens to be the third album with iconic drummer Gavin Harrison, now a full-time member the of PT, an addition that certainly elevated their musical presentation, and it should come as no surprise that Bruce Soord and Harrison share the writing credits for this release. But how does this album stand up to the rest of the band's catalogue?

As it happens quite often with bands that are either entirely or borderline in the progressive rock scene, album #13 turns out to be a disappointment (some examples would be Dream Theater, The Flower Kings, Spock's Beard, Yes, PFM, and so on). Unfortunately, The Pineapple Thief also fall into this trap, with 'Versions of the Truth' sounding more like a collection of songs that have been left off a Bruce Soord solo session. The entire record is really carried by the first four songs (which also happen to be the singles); Opener 'Versions of the Truth' is an intriguing piece that builds-up slowly just to reveal some masterful melodies, topped by the gorgeous drum sound and the introspective lyrics, 'Break It All' might be the best moment on the album, an excellent example of what this band is best at - haunting songs that are cautiously produced and never overplayed, very minimalistic but memorable. 'Demons' is another highlight, on which Soord delivers effortlessly a crisp and emotive vocal performance; the instrumentation is once again severely beautiful. Then comes 'Driving Like Maniacs', a softer entry than the more alt-rock-driven trio coming before it, is a decent song that reminisces some late 90s Porcupine Tree.

The rest of the album is quite polarizing, with some songs being completely directionless and downright forgettable and boring ('Leave Me Be', 'Out of Line', 'The Game'), to some better offerings that could still hardly stand up to the band's best; Songs like 'Our Mire' and 'Stop Making Sense' feel comfortable but not too impressive, with the length of the former (seven and a half minutes) being hardly justifiable, for example.

Overall, 'Versions of the Truth' is an enjoyable, and even somewhat uplifting, listen for the most part despite the fact this time the band focuses more on slower songs without much build-up and with more introverted soundscapes. The big let-down of this thirteenth offering from the excellent Pineapple Thief, however, is that the album loses focus as it progresses, with some songs beginning to sound dull and monotonous. Comparing it with the band's previous two releases (that also featured Gavin Harrison on drums), it has to be said that 'Versions' is entirely eclipsed by both.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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