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KAYAK

Crossover Prog • Netherlands


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Kayak biography
Founded in 1972 in Hilversum, Netherlands - Disbanded in 1982 - Reformed in 1999 (still active as of 2017)

KAYAK is a Dutch band, originating from the early seventies. The band began as a symphonic progressive rock act with an emphasis in songwriting, but from 1977 on KAYAK changed direction moving into crossover territories. KAYAK revived in the 21st century, recording new albums and touring again.

The original line-up of KAYAK was quite strange. Most members were trained musicians at the conservatoriums of Holland. Max WERNER was a professional drummer that had to sing and Pim KOOPMAN was a professional piano-player that had to play the drums (which actually was his true love). Luckily Ton SCHERPENZEEL was able to play on the keyboards, which was his profession. Later on, from 1977, Pim KOOPMAN left the band and Max WERNER became the drummer. A long-time fan, Edward REEKERS became the new vocalist.

Their debut "See See The Sun" (1973) is often seen as their biggest contribution to the symphonic prog genre. Their mix of na´ve, but very melodic symphonic songs is attractive and evokes early GENESIS, YES and some have mentioned SUPERTRAMP (which I never fully understood). KAYAK has two main composers, Ton SCHERPENZEEL and Pim KOOPMAN. The typical classical influenced style of SCHERPENZEEL remained recognizable throughout KAYAK's long career. The vocals of Max WERNER ('73-'77) are very distinctive because of his high-pitched voice that has a powerful strength-through-weakness appeal. KAYAK used many of the recognizable symphonic prog key-instruments, such as Moog and Mellotron. KAYAK's second album in 1974 was a good continuation of KAYAK's melodic/symphonic prog style, but it had a bigger focus on long compositions which was profitable for the music. "Royal Bed Bouncer" (1975) continued this course, whilst "The Last Encore" (1976) has a distinctive atmosphere with lots of great progressive songs that were perhaps the most original the band created in their progressive period. The first four albums of KAYAK are recommended to fans of the symphonic progressive rock genre.

After this the band wanted to have better sales and changed direction in to pop-territories with "Starlight Dancer" (1977), which only had the title track as a progressive song. The 1979 album "Phantom of the Night" became the biggest hit in the charts, but in the beginning of the eight...
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KAYAK discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

KAYAK top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.78 | 180 ratings
See See the Sun
1973
4.04 | 183 ratings
Kayak
1974
3.67 | 135 ratings
Royal Bed Bouncer
1975
3.45 | 101 ratings
The Last Encore
1976
3.12 | 88 ratings
Starlight Dancer
1977
3.47 | 107 ratings
Phantom of the Night
1978
3.17 | 85 ratings
Periscope Life
1980
3.33 | 112 ratings
Merlin
1981
3.75 | 110 ratings
Close to the Fire
2000
3.12 | 63 ratings
Night Vision
2001
3.87 | 150 ratings
Merlin - Bard of the Unseen
2003
3.95 | 100 ratings
Nostradamus - The Fate of Man
2005
2.81 | 76 ratings
Coming Up for Air
2008
3.34 | 69 ratings
Letters from Utopia
2009
3.45 | 58 ratings
Anywhere but Here
2011
3.64 | 61 ratings
Cleopatra - The Crown of Isis
2014
3.91 | 147 ratings
Seventeen
2018
3.96 | 79 ratings
Out of This World
2021

KAYAK Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.84 | 26 ratings
Eyewitness
1981
3.61 | 21 ratings
Chance for a Live Time
2001
4.23 | 13 ratings
KAYAKoustic live
2007
4.52 | 6 ratings
Live 2019
2020

KAYAK Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.76 | 32 ratings
In Concert - Merlin, Bard of the Unseen
2003
2.52 | 10 ratings
Greatest Hits - Live
2006

KAYAK Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.28 | 23 ratings
Starlight Dancer (US)
1978
1.62 | 4 ratings
The Best of Kayak
1978
3.00 | 4 ratings
Phantom of the Night (Italian Production)
1978
4.04 | 7 ratings
Original Tapes
1988
3.20 | 6 ratings
Kayak
1988
3.08 | 10 ratings
The Best of Kayak
1988
3.12 | 7 ratings
Original Hits
1995
3.62 | 11 ratings
3 Originals
1998
3.97 | 7 ratings
The Singles
1999
4.21 | 9 ratings
See See the Sun / Kayak
2000

KAYAK Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.50 | 2 ratings
See See the Sun / Give It a Name
1973
2.09 | 3 ratings
Lyrics / Try to Write a Book
1973
3.00 | 2 ratings
Chance for a Lifetime / My Heart Never Changed
1975
2.00 | 2 ratings
Want You to Be Mine / Starlight Dancer
1977
3.00 | 3 ratings
Phantom of the Night / Ivory Dance
1978
0.00 | 0 ratings
Keep the Chance / Winnings Ways
1979
0.00 | 0 ratings
Anne / The Sight
1980

KAYAK Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 See See the Sun by KAYAK album cover Studio Album, 1973
3.78 | 180 ratings

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See See the Sun
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by istef

4 stars Kayak is a band that is mostly known for their somewhat broadway musical sound, their verse-chorus based song structures and their - for a lack of a better term - pop leanings. That's not exactly the case with their debut "See see the sun" album, although the core sound of the band is already there.

For a debut album one must say that it already posesses a really mature sound and the compositional skills and musicianship of the members are of a very high caliber. The dominant presence is of course that of piano and keyboard man and main songwriter Ton Scherpenzeel, but the rest of the band members are there, and gain their fair share of the listener's attention. Especially guitarist Johan Slager, without being overly flashy or self indulgent, serves the compositions really well and has his fine moments, like on the instrumental part of "Mouldy Wood". Also worth mentioning is drummer Pim Koopman. Although there are no really tricky or innovative drum parts, his playing is solid but varied enough to keep things interesting, let alone that he is also an important music contributor having credits on 7 out of 9 tracks on the album, with "Lovely Luna" credited only to him. Interestingly enough, this track has minimum percussion presence.

A very interesting aspect of the album is the overall build up of the vocals' sections. Main vocalist Max Werlerofzoiets (kudos for one of the most unpronouncable names ever!) is nothing funcy, (the band would have better vocalists in the future), but gets the job done. The most obvious influence would be Jon Anderson with some Peter Gabriel thrown in the mix. The opening track "Reason for it All" or "Mammoth" being a fine example of the former case, while "Ballet of the Cripple" shows the Gabrielesque side of things. That being said, I would have to point out that the most interesting thing about vocals is that they are generally a result of team work, with 6 people in total credited with vocal duties. There are some interesting well thought-out vocal parts throughout the album, although again this is an aspect of their music that would evolve and improve on later releases.

All in all, this is probably Kayak's album that is the closest to symphonic prog they ever got. The influences by Yes, Genesis or Moody Blues are generally smoothly incorporated to the band's fairly original character. (with the exception of "Reason for it All" which is a bit too Yes-y). During the late 70s they would develop a sound more of their own, but this (maybe along with following year's "Kayak" album) is their proggiest moment. A strong, solid, 3 1/2, close to full 4 stars, release.

 Kayak by KAYAK album cover Studio Album, 1974
4.04 | 183 ratings

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Kayak
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by ElChanclas

4 stars Kayak is the 2nd studio album by Dutch symphonic and crossover prog band Kayak, and my point of entry to their #symphonicprog years.

The lineup at this point was comprised of Max Werner on lead vocals, percussion and Mellotron; Johan Slager on guitars and backing vocals; Ton Scherpenzeel all types of keyboards, organ and piano; Cees Van Leeuwen on bass and harmonica; and Kim Koopman on drums and vocals.

In a nutshell, a great band with exceptional musicianship and songwriting; Kayak is an album where the symphonic prog fan will find some resemblance to early Genesis on songs such as the mini epic They Get to Know Me and the haunting Woe and Alas; some Yes in songs like the jumpy Serenades and Trust in The Machine; and the #classicrock and prog pop fan a little Supertramp in Wintertime; an ode to The Beatles on the fabulous closer His Master's noise, and more upfront rockers on the opener Alibi or mainstream rock ballads like Mountain Too Rough? so there's a lot of great sounding and perfectly executed variety to keep the listener entertained. A great late discovery for me, a band with more than fifteen albums on their backs, with more than half of those worth checking out? this one is barely over 35 minutes so is a very quick and fast listen. Guess I have some homework to do! My personal highlights:

- Wintertime

- The Get to Know Me

- Serenades

- Woes and Alas

- His Master's noise

 Out of This World by KAYAK album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.96 | 79 ratings

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Out of This World
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars It is strange to think that soon we will be coming to Kayak's 50th anniversary, an achievement for any band. Of course, there have been multiple line-up changes over the years, plus the band has had breaks, but the current five-man line-up stands proudly when looking back over their achievements. Of course, at the heart of it is all is Ton Scherpenzeel (keyboards, lead & backing vocals), the founder who has kept it going all these years. Drummer Hans Eijkenaar joined in 2010 before leaving and then rejoining recently, while the others all joined when Ton reset the band after 2014's 'Cleopatra ' The Crown of Isis'. They are of course Bart Schwertmann (lead & backing vocals), Marcel Singor (guitar, lead & backing vocals) and Kristoffer Gildenl'w (bass, lead & backing vocals). Yes, there are a lot of singers on here, and while Schwertmann can be heard on most of the tracks, Marcel Singor takes lead on three, while Kristoffer Gildenl'w and Ton Scherpenzeel have one each. On top of that, drummer Hans Eijkenaar debuts as composer, working with Ton to write the music of 'Traitor's Gate' while the rest of the album was written by the band leader alone.

This is not a band using a name to get some publicity, but instead are showing they are standing on the shoulders of giants as they continue to thrive and deliver an album which is a delight from beginning to end. This is not some geriatric outfit with nothing to offer who are still surviving on loyalties built from music in the past, but have produced an album which is exciting, inventive, immediate and an awful lot of fun. There is a mix between different styles, some more commercial than others, and the result is something which any proghead will enjoy the very first time they play it and will continue to gain more as they repeat. There is some tasteful guitar here and there, while Ton is of course a wonderful in- demand keyboard player, here providing both swathes as backdrops or taking leads, while the drums set the foundation and of course multi-instrumentalist Gildenl'w is always there to add to some finesse.

It is a highly polished release, full of crossover elements which sees it bring in some pop as well as some symphonic, and it is nice to listen to an album which is just so easy to enjoy and not have to work at. Let's hope they have more in them yet as this is not the sound of a band ready to retire.

 Out of This World by KAYAK album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.96 | 79 ratings

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Out of This World
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The Dutch melodic symphonic crossover group Kayak is going through a brilliant phase since founding member Ton Scherpenzeel reformed the group in 2018 with the record 'Seventeen'. The 'Live 2019' record showed the new band to be in a glorious form on stage (which I also witnessed myself in the city of Arnhem). Vocalist Bart Schwertmann is the best singer the band ever had (which is saying a lot) and master guitarist Marcel Singer is the ballsy counterweight to Ton Scherpenzeel's very melodic and classically influenced type of songwriting. On their latest record 'Out of this World' the band manages to bring some of that great podium flair to the record (something lacking on the rather flat sounding 'Seventeen' record). The production is quite good here. Kayak usually makes albums with a few strong progressive rock tracks and a string of lighter melodic pop rock songs and this album is no different. There are however a lot of great five-star progressive tracks here; 'Out of This World', 'Under a Scar', 'Kaja', 'Mystery', 'The Way She Said Goodbye', 'Critical Mass', 'Red Rag to a Bull' and 'A Writer's Tale' are all tracks fit among the best material of the band. Think of extended Kayak classics like 'Merlin', 'Icarus', 'Starlight Dancer' and 'Daphne'. The band uses some classic building blocks to make the sound typically 'Kayak'; the intelligent harmonic chords patterns by Scherpenzeel, the endless melodic lines in vocals and guitar, the interesting mood changes within songs and the band's recognizable 'light touch' to tie it all together. Sadly the album is also plagued by three out of place sounding pop songs on which guitarist Marcel Singor has lead vocals. As much as I adore his guitar playing, I just don't see how these songs fit on a Kayak album with their strong influences of Bowie and perhaps Sting. Other notable songs are 'One by One', a ballad sung by bass player Kristoffer Gildenl÷w that could have been written by Trans-siberian Orchestra. The last songs 'Ship of Theseus' is sung by Ton Scherpenzeel himself and is actually a nice ending with a ghost ship theme and atmosphere. This album could have easily been Kayak's 21th century swansong and it would still have had a playing time of 50 minutes, but as it stands I can't give it more than four stars. 'Out of this World' does however offer some of the best symphonic progressive rock of 2021 and therefor comes as highly recommended to listeners of before-mentioned genres.
 Out of This World by KAYAK album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.96 | 79 ratings

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Out of This World
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

5 stars The exquisitely arpeggiated piano intro to the title track lets everybody know from the very beginning that this classic Dutch outfit is back, and in the best form. And not only the instrumental prowess is back with them, but also the melodies, the tasteful (and tasty) arrangements and that fine pop craftmanship delivering great songs.

Having said that, it doesn't mean that there's few or nothing for the prog ear in this album, on the contrary: the good melodies take off and reach great high in the interplay and in the always sensible vocals. And the best part is that this happens with each and every track, you don't have to digest a lot of fillers in order to find just a couple of listenable tracks. The whole album flows nicely in a high level of musicianship, it never leaves you just waiting to see if the next track can save the day.

As a sample of the more basic, song-oriented material, give a listen to the track 14 Cary. As for the more epic content, go for the opener, and the tracks 3 Under a Scar, 6 Critical Mass, & 13 A Winter's Tale. The closer, even when brief, is a great symphonic moment.

 Starlight Dancer (US) by KAYAK album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1978
3.28 | 23 ratings

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Starlight Dancer (US)
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

3 stars As what seems to be the case with most people, my introduction to Kayak was through the excellent album "Phantom of the Night". This album, once it grows on you, will possibly influence you to check out Kayak's discography, and you'll find out that the band got it's start in 1972 and then disbanded in 1982 after releasing around 9 albums. During this time, the band saw many line-up changes, but founder Ton Scherpenzeel has been the one constant through the years. Then, in 1999, they were invited to participate in a TV show, and they decided to re-form. Since then, they are still active and have released several more albums since. There are, as a result, many albums to choose from.

Kayak's music has pretty much been a progressive pop style, not unlike that of The Alan Parson's Project in the use of pop, prog, and symphonic styles that make you sit up and listen while not really realizing that you are listening to progressive music until you get to know it better. It is bright music, led mostly by piano and other keyboards, but also not afraid to let the guitar take charge along the way.

So, if you are interested in checking out their discography, the album "Starlight Dancer" can be a somewhat confusing affair. It was released in Europe in 1977, and another version was released in North America at the same time. Now, this was a practice that was done by the record companies quite often. The track line-ups on the different versions of "Starlight Dancer" are quite different, to the point of them being two different albums. This was done in order to pick out songs that the record company "Janus" thought would appeal more to the population of the US and Canada. Instead of replacing one or two songs, though, the NA version only kept 4 of the songs from the European version of the album, and on top of that, replaced two of those with "demo" versions of the original album tracks. These songs were the title track, "Turn the Tide" and demo versions of "Irene" and "I Want You to Be Mine" They also included a track not on the European album version that was only released as a b-side in Europe; "Ballad for a Lost Friend". The other 6 tracks all come from the previously released album "The Last Encore". As a result of this, the NA version of "Starlight Dancer" actually becomes a compilation, with most songs coming from the previous album, not the current album. To make things even more confusing, the album cover on the US version is the exact same as the album cover from "The Last Encore" (except for the album title).

So, this particular review is for the North American version of "Starlight Dancer". I have not been able to listen to the European version, so I don't know how to compare it to that one. However, this version demonstrates the direction that Ton wanted to take his band, and it includes some bright, prog pop tracks that those who listened to "Phantom of the Night" would probably expect, but also contains some nice, soaring ballads, all with the prog edge needed to keep them interesting, but with pop-centered riffs and melodies that will stick in your head, but in a good way.

The album begins and ends with the demo versions taken from the recording sessions from 1977. Why the label decided to use the demo versions is unknown, but they both sound quite finished to me without hearing the finished versions of them. "I Want You to Be Mine" is a good opener and prepares the listener for the signature prog-pop sound of the band. "Ballad for a Lost Friend" is a bit more like a ballad which picks up later in the song and one of my favorites from the album. By the time you get to "Nothingness" you are ready for something not so bright, and you get it here with a soaring and sweet ballad which carries over somewhat in the next track that grows off of that.

The title track opens up the 2nd side with what is probably the best track on the album. At this point, more of the symphonic style is added in though throughout the album you have heard the use of the string ensemble, you'll really notice it here along with the Alan Parson's Project similarities. After this, the tracks are a bit shorter and begin to sound alike as they continue in this manner with the bright prog-pop they are known for. Things cool down a bit for the softer and flowing instrumental, the demo version of "Irene" which closes the album.

Just as is the case with most of Kayak's music, this album spotlights that pop-prog sound with the right mix of symphonic and folk influences that make it feel like, on first listen, that you are not even hearing prog. But as you become more familiar with it, you start to notice the non-standard phrasing and lyrical tendencies and the other subtle things the band uses to give it a light amount of complexity. As with most of their albums, it is a very pleasant listen, not at all challenging, yet not groundbreaking at all either. Many hard-core progressive fans will not like this because it is quite light on the progressiveness, but if you enjoy the lighter side of prog, then you should know this band because this is what they specialize in.

 Phantom of the Night / Ivory Dance by KAYAK album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1978
3.00 | 3 ratings

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Phantom of the Night / Ivory Dance
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

3 stars I think there's another version to this single (intended to the US market) where the prime side was given to "Keep the Change", a nicely paced mid-tempo song with radio potencial, dealing with romantic disappointment.

On the A side, from the album of the same name, we have "Phantom of the Night", a romantic ghosts tale, with nice vocals, exquisite classical piano and electric guitar lines rounding the chorus in a way that is really hard to forget.

On the B side, "Ivory Dance" is a nifty, yet not tremendously inspiring keyboards excercise resulting in some amusement for a night where your dining plans went overboard.

 Live 2019 by KAYAK album cover Live, 2020
4.52 | 6 ratings

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Live 2019
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

4 stars To try and put together a potted history including all the details of what has happened to this band over the years is a task beyond me, but let's just say that since their inception back in 1972 they have been one of the most important progressive rock bands in the Dutch scene. Keyboard player and composer Ton Scherpenzeel had basically given up on bringing Kayak back together again but decided to start afresh with a new line-up and in 2017 they released 'Seventeen' which reached #6 in the Dutch charts, their highest placing since 1980. This led to some tours with a line- up of Bart Schwertman (vocals, acoustic guitar, bass, percussion), Marcel Singor (guitar, vocals), Kristoffer Gildenl÷w (bass, vocals) and returning drummer Hans Eijkenaar. They recorded some of the dates, and the original idea was to make a live album available just to fans on their next tour with The Flower Kings, but after that was shelved a decision was made to have it available through their website instead. I have the version which has been released as part of the wonderful True Music Guide series (#17), which is an A5 booklet containing an interview and photos, but as this was a limited edition I am not sure if it is still available.

Anyway, it is all about the music, and this double CD set lasts nearly two hours, yet it flies by. Here we have a band who may only have got together for the tour, yet the name has a long history and the crowd know all the songs and are there for a great time, and of course the band reacts to that. Schwertman and Singor are new names to me, but they are more than up for the job. Scherpenzeel is at the helm, which given he wrote or co-wrote virtually all the 22 songs on display is no surprise, and with a strong rhythm section it allows Schwertman and Singor to really relax into their roles. Singor is a very powerful guitarist, and if this band had been formed 20 years later than they had, then they would be discussed as neo prog as certainly in the live environment that is how their material comes across. Hard rock, melodic rock, progressive rock all combines together to create music which is dynamic, forceful and plain great fun.

Schwertman may have been an unknown before joining the band in time for the last album, but he is at home with the old material as he is with the new and is a singer with plenty of range and emotion. Let us all hope that Scherpenzeel fully recovers from his heart attack, and that this band can again get back into the studio and then onto the stage as nearly fifty years down the road, Kayak still have a great deal to offer the prog world.

 Live 2019 by KAYAK album cover Live, 2020
4.52 | 6 ratings

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Live 2019
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Kayak is a Dutch symphonic / crossover prog group originating from the seventies. Founder Ton Scherpenzeel (keyboards, composer) was left but nothing but the Kayak legacy, after co-founder Pim Koopman had died in 2009 and the steady line-up until 2015 had all but dispersed into different projects. But then the tables were turned for Scherpenzeel; in 2018 the well-received album 'Seventeen' was released on InsideOut music with a completely new line-up. The band now reinvigorated, it got booked (by Glassville Music) for better venues than before and listening to this simply stellar album it isn't hard to see why.

This is a classic rock / prog concert. It has that musical flair of Queen, that symphonic hardrock of Saga, the heart crushing guitar leads of Camel and that unmatched harmonic and melodic song-writing by Kayak. Though the often gentle and classical influenced keyboards of Scherpenzeel are still the basis for the songs, he is now accompanied with this amazing band that almost outplays him. Guitarist Marcel Singor enhances every melody he touches with his thick lucid guitar tone and adds melodic hardrock finesse and splendor to all the songs. Bassist Kristoffer Gildenlow (former Pain of Salvation) became a fulltime member for the tour, he needs no further introduction. As much I may personally admire the guitar playing of Marcel Singor, he can't help being unable to outshine the newly introduced lead vocalist Bart Schwertman. His performance is worth studying for aspiring vocalists; his immense skill, endurance, variety and sense of style is unmatched by any prog concert I know of. The material ranges from mid-seventies symphonic prog, hardrock, modern symphonic, art pop to rockmusical - songs already sung by three different types of vocalists before him. Yet he finds a common feel to tie everything together in a strong-willed, heartfelt and - above all - festive classic rock vibe.

This 2019 version of Kayak simply crushes some of the original versions of songs like 'Daphne', 'Still My Heart Cries For You', 'Alibi', 'Irene' and 'Starlight Dancer'. On top of it the band produces a stellar version of the band's greatest hit 'Ruthless Queen'. The material of 'Seventeen' sounds significantly better than on the record as well and the albums two mini-epics 'La Peregrina' and 'Cracks' shine brightly here.

With an amazing energy, a strong recording sound and an almost perfect two hour long set-list Kayak delivers what must be one of the best live albums of modern progressive rock. I enjoy it as much as Arena's ''Live & Life'. An essential album for fans of symphonic prog, classic (art)rock and neo-progressive.

 Nostradamus - The Fate of Man by KAYAK album cover Studio Album, 2005
3.95 | 100 ratings

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Nostradamus - The Fate of Man
Kayak Crossover Prog

Review by octopus-4
Special Collaborator RIO/Avant/Zeuhl,Neo & Post/Math Teams

4 stars In a Rock Opera about a character who really existed, it's also important that the novelization is coherent with the real history as much as possible. Another important required characteristic is that the story flows from one song to the other without having to interrupt it too often by a narrator. Last but obviously not least, the music must be good. KAYAK surely succeeds in creating good music to support the story. Both the songs and the instrumental symphonic parts are good and the passages are melodic but never trivial as usual with this Dutch band. I don't know if a real musical has ever been performed. Probably not. KAYAK is a band that usually doesn't perform out of its Country, mainly beacause its mastermind Ton Scherpenzeel doesn't want to put a feet on an airplane and this is quite a big limit.

Back to the story: the character of Michel de Notre Dame, aka Nostradamus is famous for his hermetic profecies, and there's a huge amount of books about him and his writings. In a "compact version" of this opera, released as a single CD, there's a narration, in English and in Dutch about what the true story might have been, with an interesting, realistic, hypothesis.

An exhaustive review of all the songs would take long and wouldn't be of any use if one is interested in this double CD. Some of the songs are really excellent and who is practical with the musical style of KAYAK will find here them at their best.

Being it an Opera, some themes are recurring several times. "Celestial Science" and "A Man with Remarkable Talents" are two of themost important themes, but my personal favorite is "Save My Wife" which is dramatic, sad and has a melodic structure tytpical of the best KAYAK songs.

A great concept album from the same land of "The Human Equation". It's a pity that while Arjen Lucassen has been able to bring his one to a theather and to a DVD, KAYAK failed to do the same. A complete Rock Opera that probably will never be peroformed on stage, if not just by the band playing the songs.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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