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HAWKWIND

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


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Hawkwind biography
Formed in London, UK in 1969 - Still active as of 2018

Over their 30-odd year history, HAWKWIND were probably the most famous underground rock band in the world. The group was formed in the late '60s by guitarist/singer Dave BROCK, guitarist Mick SLATTERY and saxman/flautist/singer Nik TURNER. Dave BROCK was the leader of HAWKWIND and he was the captain, as it were. The band never would have made it for 30 years without Dave.

HAWKWIND's history has been marked by a series of confusing line-ups through 40 or so personnel changes. Their sound has continued to metamorphose and evolve: an almost jazz feel ("Hawkwind"), the "experimental" & acoustic sounds of early releases ("In Search of Space"), changing to the metal sound of their days (mid 70's), and a modern electronic feel on the latest ("Electric Teepee"). Yes, one can detect definite evolutions. With the primary use of the synthesizer, heavy and delay with the touch of techno, HAWKWIND practically created a genre of music that be called: psychedelic space-rock. Their creativity seems to be in the use of the synths to add to the intense moods of their songs. They were the master of the acid-space rock genre.

There are at least 100 total albums that are either compilations, EP's, bootlegs of live performances, etc. You can't go wrong with any of the 70's releases in my opinion.
"Doremi Fasol Latido" ('72) - A great album with a heavy metal space rock a-la lan Lemmy KILMISTER, who later founded MOTORHEAD.
"A Space Ritual" ('73) - The essential live album combining Space-rock music, and poetry. The GREATEST album in the world!
"Hall of the Mountain Grill" ('74) - A great album for FLOYD fans - very heavy, psychedelic music with lots of effects.
"Warrior at the Edge of Time" ('75) - In my opinion, THE classic album.
"Quark, Strangeness and Charm" ('77) - A return to a more traditional HAWKWIND sound.
"The Hawklords - 25 Years On" ('78)
"PXR 5" ('79) - This album really started the HAWKWIND tradition of semi-live, semi-studio albums.

Then you should consider the following efforts which I would recommend to the "Hawkfan":
"Levitation" ('80) - The last truly great HAWKWIND studio album.
"The Church of Hawkwind" ('82) - Really a Dave BROCK solo album. Very spacey and electronic.
"Chronicle of the Black...
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HAWKWIND discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

HAWKWIND top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.40 | 298 ratings
Hawkwind
1970
3.64 | 394 ratings
X In Search Of Space
1971
3.76 | 357 ratings
Doremi Fasol Latido
1972
3.99 | 468 ratings
Hall of the Mountain Grill
1974
4.09 | 679 ratings
Warrior on the Edge of Time
1975
3.45 | 184 ratings
Astounding Sounds, Amazing Music
1976
3.69 | 238 ratings
Quark, Strangeness And Charm
1977
3.27 | 130 ratings
Hawklords: 25 Years On
1978
2.91 | 131 ratings
PXR 5
1979
3.98 | 259 ratings
Levitation
1980
3.18 | 105 ratings
Sonic Attack
1981
2.81 | 99 ratings
Church Of Hawkwind
1982
2.74 | 92 ratings
Choose Your Masques
1982
3.45 | 125 ratings
The Chronicle Of The Black Sword
1985
3.24 | 103 ratings
The Xenon Codex
1988
3.06 | 103 ratings
Space Bandits
1990
3.81 | 123 ratings
Electric Tepee
1992
2.86 | 83 ratings
It Is The Business Of The Future To Be Dangerous
1993
3.25 | 81 ratings
Alien 4
1995
3.26 | 61 ratings
Distant Horizons
1997
2.25 | 47 ratings
In Your Area
1998
2.91 | 46 ratings
Spacebrock
2000
2.63 | 78 ratings
Take Me To Your Leader
2005
3.21 | 39 ratings
Take Me To Your Future
2006
3.68 | 123 ratings
Blood Of The Earth
2010
3.61 | 97 ratings
Onward
2012
3.72 | 24 ratings
Hawkwind Light Orchestra: Stellar Variations
2012
3.43 | 44 ratings
The Machine Stops
2016
3.68 | 47 ratings
Into the Woods
2017
3.18 | 25 ratings
Road To Utopia
2018
3.03 | 23 ratings
All Aboard the Skylark
2019
4.07 | 15 ratings
Hawkwind Light Orchestra: Carnivorous
2020
4.00 | 7 ratings
Somnia
2021

HAWKWIND Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.20 | 297 ratings
Space Ritual
1973
3.84 | 74 ratings
Live Seventy Nine
1980
3.33 | 25 ratings
The Text of Festival - Hawkwind Live 1970-1972
1983
2.31 | 36 ratings
Zones
1983
3.33 | 33 ratings
This is Hawkwind - Do Not Panic
1984
1.89 | 33 ratings
Bring Me the Head of Yuri Gagarin
1985
1.74 | 14 ratings
Hawkwind Live '70/'73
1985
2.80 | 38 ratings
Space Ritual Vol. 2
1985
3.73 | 72 ratings
Live Chronicles
1986
3.74 | 62 ratings
Palace Springs
1991
3.18 | 29 ratings
BBC Radio 1 Live
1991
3.21 | 25 ratings
The Friday Rock Show Sessions Live at Reading '86
1992
3.28 | 29 ratings
California Brainstorm
1992
3.78 | 28 ratings
The Hawklords Live
1992
2.00 | 11 ratings
Live - ST.Albans U.K. Winter Tour 1979
1993
4.22 | 40 ratings
The Business Trip
1994
2.72 | 21 ratings
Undisclosed Files - Addendum
1995
4.31 | 46 ratings
Love in Space
1996
3.66 | 42 ratings
The 1999 Party
1997
2.16 | 17 ratings
Live & Rare: Onward Flies The Bird
1997
2.14 | 7 ratings
Welcome to The Future
1997
3.78 | 9 ratings
Hawkwind 1997
1997
1.65 | 15 ratings
Live at Glastonbury 90
1999
2.40 | 10 ratings
The Collectors Serise Vol. 2: Live 1982 (Choose Your Masques)
1999
2.00 | 5 ratings
Live - 1970-72
1999
2.45 | 11 ratings
Thrilling Hawkwind Adventures
2000
1.62 | 12 ratings
Live from The Darkside
2000
3.56 | 18 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 1 : Dave Brock, Sonic Assassins
2000
2.94 | 17 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 2 : Hawkwind Live / Hawklords Studio
2000
3.38 | 20 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 3 : Free Festivals
2000
2.79 | 19 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 4 : Live '78
2000
2.82 | 17 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 5 : Live '76 & '77
2000
2.71 | 14 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 6 : Live 1970-1973
2001
2.87 | 15 ratings
The Weird Tapes Vol. 7 : Dave Brock, The Demos
2001
2.78 | 28 ratings
Atomhenge 76
2001
3.56 | 23 ratings
Yule Ritual
2001
3.59 | 16 ratings
Live 1990
2002
3.87 | 36 ratings
Canterbury Fayre 2001
2002
3.84 | 13 ratings
Live in Nottingham (2002)
2002
4.53 | 18 ratings
Spaced Out in London
2002
2.38 | 8 ratings
Cosmic Overdirve
2002
2.61 | 14 ratings
Live ´74 The Chicago Auditorium 21 March 1974
2006
3.50 | 23 ratings
Space Ritual (2CD+DVD)
2007
1.86 | 9 ratings
Winter Solstice 2005
2009
1.56 | 7 ratings
Minneapolis 1989
2009
1.27 | 9 ratings
Shot Down in the Night
2009
3.53 | 19 ratings
Leave No Star Unturned
2011
3.73 | 11 ratings
Space Ritual Live
2015
3.93 | 5 ratings
At The Roundhouse
2017
4.00 | 3 ratings
50 LIVE
2020

HAWKWIND Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.89 | 10 ratings
Chaos
1996
3.00 | 7 ratings
Classic Rock Legends (DVD)
2001
3.38 | 19 ratings
Out Of The Shadows (DVD)
2004
3.09 | 13 ratings
Knights Of Space
2008
1.36 | 5 ratings
Winter Solstice - Live at the Astoria 2005
2009
1.21 | 6 ratings
USA Tour 1989-1990
2009
3.78 | 9 ratings
Live 1984 - 1995
2009
1.40 | 6 ratings
Treworgey 29th July 1989
2009

HAWKWIND Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.97 | 28 ratings
Roadhawks
1976
3.03 | 45 ratings
Masters of the Universe
1977
3.40 | 16 ratings
Friends and Relations
1982
3.14 | 14 ratings
Friends & Relations..... Twice Upon a Time
1983
2.20 | 5 ratings
Utopia 1984
1985
3.45 | 11 ratings
Friends & Relations Vol. 3
1985
2.12 | 12 ratings
In The Beginning...
1985
2.09 | 11 ratings
Ridicule
1985
3.51 | 9 ratings
Anthology Vol 1
1985
1.81 | 24 ratings
Out & Intake
1987
1.80 | 5 ratings
Early Daze [Best of...]
1987
3.31 | 13 ratings
Spirit of The Age
1988
3.64 | 13 ratings
Acid Daze The History of Hawkwind
1990
4.00 | 16 ratings
Stasis The U.A. Years 1971-1975
1990
3.00 | 8 ratings
The Best of & The Rest of Hawkwind
1990
3.94 | 7 ratings
Anthology
1991
3.89 | 7 ratings
Masters Of The Universe (1991/ Castle)
1991
3.89 | 10 ratings
Psychedelic Warlords
1992
3.00 | 6 ratings
Mighty Hawkwind Classics 1980-1985
1992
2.80 | 5 ratings
Lord of Light
1993
2.08 | 6 ratings
The Best of Hawkwind
1994
1.22 | 4 ratings
Silver Machine
1994
3.93 | 5 ratings
25 Years on 1970-1973
1994
3.93 | 5 ratings
25 Years on 1973-1977
1994
2.12 | 7 ratings
Independent Days Volume 1 & 2
1995
3.75 | 3 ratings
Silver Machine
1995
2.00 | 2 ratings
Space Is Deep
1995
3.48 | 13 ratings
The Ambient Anarchists
1997
3.77 | 13 ratings
Sonic Boom Killers Best of Singles A's and B's from 1970 to 1980
1998
2.69 | 7 ratings
Anthology 1967-1982
1998
2.09 | 4 ratings
The Master
1998
3.45 | 11 ratings
Golden Void 1969-1979
1999
3.50 | 4 ratings
Year 2000: Codename Hawkwind Volume One
1999
3.20 | 9 ratings
Complete '79 Collector Series Vol. 1
1999
2.86 | 18 ratings
Epocheclipse: The Ultimate Best Of
1999
4.17 | 29 ratings
Epoche-Eclipse / 30 Year Anthology
1999
3.33 | 3 ratings
Family Box 4CD SET Limited Edition Collector's Set
2000
3.67 | 3 ratings
The Stonehenge Collection (Zones / This is Hawkwind - Do Not Panic)
2000
2.25 | 4 ratings
The Hawkwind Collection - The Legends Collection
2001
2.67 | 6 ratings
Masters Of The Universe
2001
1.96 | 6 ratings
Family Tree
2001
3.91 | 4 ratings
Masters of Rock
2002
3.00 | 6 ratings
Welcome to The Future
2003
3.60 | 5 ratings
Oscillations
2003
4.15 | 11 ratings
The Dream Goes On - An Anthology 1985 - 1997
2008
4.14 | 12 ratings
Spirit Of The Age - An Anthology - 1976 - 1984
2008
4.75 | 4 ratings
Parallel Universe: A Liberty/U.A. Years Anthology 1970-1974
2011
4.39 | 5 ratings
5 Album Set
2013
3.36 | 22 ratings
Spacehawks
2013

HAWKWIND Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.83 | 9 ratings
Hurry on a Sundown
1970
4.58 | 19 ratings
Silver Machine
1972
2.90 | 12 ratings
Urban Guerrilla
1973
3.80 | 10 ratings
The Psychedelic Warlords (Disappear In Smoke)
1974
3.56 | 9 ratings
Kings Of Speed
1975
3.78 | 9 ratings
25 Years EP
1978
2.74 | 10 ratings
Who's Gonna Win The War?
1980
3.20 | 10 ratings
Shot Down In The Night (live)
1980
3.90 | 10 ratings
Sonic Assassins (ep)
1981
3.25 | 8 ratings
Angels Of Death
1981
2.59 | 8 ratings
Motorhead
1982
2.67 | 6 ratings
Motorway City
1983
3.43 | 7 ratings
Your Last Chance EP
1983
3.59 | 12 ratings
Night of the Hawks (ep)
1983
3.75 | 8 ratings
Independent Days EP
1984
3.88 | 7 ratings
Needle Gun
1985
4.00 | 2 ratings
Zarozinia
1986
3.29 | 7 ratings
Decide Your Future EP
1993
3.00 | 5 ratings
Area 54 EP
1995
3.60 | 5 ratings
Love In Space
1997
3.17 | 6 ratings
Spirit Of The Age
2005
0.00 | 0 ratings
Take Me to Your Leader (Radio Interview EP)
2005
3.00 | 3 ratings
Silver Machine
2007
0.00 | 0 ratings
Green Finned Demon
2011
0.00 | 0 ratings
Solitary Man
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Rangoon, Langoons
2019

HAWKWIND Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Into the Woods by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.68 | 47 ratings

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Into the Woods
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars "Into the Woods", released in 2017, was considered by the band to be a sequel to the previous album "The Machine Stops". By this time, the only long-time members that are still with this band are Dave Brock and Richard Chadwick. Everyone else is among the constantly changing personnel. However, this album is one of the most varied, yet strangely typical, of the later Hawkwind albums. It is full of surprises, fun and plenty of Hawkwind space jams.

It is a bit of a surprise that, with the many bad Hawkwind albums that have been released in the later years, that they can still cull together a decent album like this one. A lot of it has to do with the fact that when the band takes itself less seriously, they seem to have more fun and the result is a better album. The two previously named individuals play pretty much most of the instruments on the album, and that probably helps to streamline and focus their sound. Everyone else involved with the album are more like guests that appear on a few of the tracks and contribute various vocals and instrumentals. This allows Brock and Chadwick to focus on the overall sound of the album.

There is a surprising amount of old-style Hawkwind atmosphere here, especially in the longer jams as in "Into the Woods", "Have You Seen Them?", the wild and wacky "Space Ship Blues" (which features steel guitar, fiddle, harmonica and banjo mixed into the spacey wall of noise) that has this 50's rock n roll/country space vibe, the mystical/mythological vibe of "Dark Nymph" and the best (saved till the last) space jam of all "Magic Mushroom". There are the usual, shorter tracks that attempt to glue it all together, and in this case, they all seem to be related with the use of natural sounds as a background to either spoken word or musical interlude-style melodies, like the organic and acoustic "Darkland" which is as organic sounding as Hawkwind gets as the space effects are still there, just deep in the background. They even take a decent stab at a blues-based hard rocker with ""Magic Scenes" or even make fun of themselves with "Vegan Lunch".

There is a lot here for everyone, but its still all made cohesive by the traditional space/psychedelic style of the band. Even with the variety here, there is still no mistaking that this is Hawkwind for those that are long time fans. There is nothing here that will offend any of the old fans, and there are some songs that might even garner the band some new fans even though many of them might think that some of the band's styles could be a bit strange sounding to their radio-trained ears. Don't worry, there's plenty here to keep the space fans satisfied. This album, if nothing else, still proves that this band that has been around for a long time can still put out a fun and decent album and lovers of the new psychedelic bands will be happy to hear from the band that had a lot of influence on those new groups. This is one of their better ones from their more recent discography.

 Doremi Fasol Latido by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.76 | 357 ratings

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Doremi Fasol Latido
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by DamoXt7942
Forum & Site Admin Group Avant/Cross/Neo/Post Teams

4 stars Dear oldie goodie space rock. Needless to say, HAWKWIND's third album "Doremi Fasol Latido", following their 'creation of fame' "In Search Of Space", pushed themselves to the top runner of Psychedelic Progressive / Space Rock scene. Currently we can hear plenty of Space Rock opuses here and there, that have already been called 'old- fashioned', but mysteriously their spacey atmospheric configuration through this album has still been fresh and fruity. Although their recording, mixing, or producing, sounds like a tad ancient-looking cheesy, cheap movie set, their strong intention for spicy spacey structure can be digested directly and smoothly. We could hear their positivity and creativity via this giant full of rigidity (authentic space rock construction or hard rock appearance) and moderateness (slightly catchy texture). Unshakable HAWKWIND world we can gain experience.

The departure "Brainstorm" involves almost all of their innovative, impressive originality. It's the longest track in this creation but we cannot feel so long nor redundant deeply in it. As if we attended their live on stage as the audience, our inner mind should be merged and unified into their improvised and calculated playing completely. Such old material recorded 50 years ago (!) should not make us feel old-fashioned ... what a mystery. "Lord Of Light", later added as a radio-edited bonus track into the remastered version released in 1996, is one of their catchy, the most acceptable songs. Whilst holding their enthusiasm for space rock stances, they would keep good feeling in the melody lines and rhythmic bases. On the contrary, we can enjoy another alteration of sounds in "Time We Left This World Today" created with repetitive sticky phrases and gradual shifts of their playing style. In the middle part we can get immersed in crazy improvisational battles of  the lead guitar, the bass guitar, the drums, and the synthesizers. "The Watcher" is acoustic, and slightly depressive, but mystically comfortable one. Dave's voices are not so good (because the atmosphere around this track is quiet and simple methinks) but who cares?

"Doremi Fasol Latido" can be thought of as one of progressive rock textbooks that are passed down from generation to generation.

 In Your Area by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1998
2.25 | 47 ratings

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In Your Area
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

1 stars In 1998, one has to wonder why Hawkwind was even still a band after putting out a string of mediocre (or less) albums for quite some time. It was during that year that the band decided to put out "In Your Area" which is an album where the first half of the album is live and the 2nd half is in studio. The core of the band at this time was down to 4 members with the consistent member Dave Brock running the show. But, when you hear this album, you have to wonder if he really was running things. It sounds like he is only there in order to use the Hawkwind moniker as for the most part, his guitar and other contributions seem a bit lackluster.

There were other members, so to speak, than these core 4, but they were not considered members as much as they were guests. Included among these guests is Captain Rizz who I think was there to try to make the band more "relevant" or something. You can hear his input almost from the start. After about 5 minutes of a live version of "Brainstorm", the song suddenly takes a huge turn for the worse as it takes on a plastic reggae beat and Rizz adds his vocals which are totally out of their element here. This doesn't just last for a minute or two either, but end up continuing for the rest of the 11 minute track. This happens again in "Love in Space/Rat Race" which ends up being even more annoying than the first track.

So, you might be hoping that the studio side of the album is better. It isn't. The songs have no heart. They sound like they are attempting to reinvent space rock, but instead of that, they make a mockery of it. Even though the track "Hippy" shows a little bit of promise, it isn't enough to save this album. There just isn't that much more to say about it. Fortunately, the album didn't sell well. If it had, it would have made Hawkwind into a joke. This is one to stay away from, even if you are a fan, however, there are those that must have the entire library, so leave this one for them.

 X In Search Of Space by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1971
3.64 | 394 ratings

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X In Search Of Space
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars Even though 'X in Search of Space' was only Hawkwind's 2nd album, the band was already experiencing the curse of the revolving door on the band members. Most of this had to do with the use (and even non-use) of drugs. Trying to explain the personnel changes is way too confusing. However, the change in the band's style and music is the most important thing to pay attention to on this album. This sophomore album would bring more attention to the band especially in the UK and send them on their way to establishing their sound and style. This album is a very important step in the creation of a new sub-genre, that being space rock. It is based mostly around extended jams with the lyrics and melodies coming in around it all.

Though the album does not show the band quite at its peak yet, it is a huge step in the right direction. Even so, I do prefer the debut album to this one even if it is further away from the direction that the band would take. However, it is still and enjoyable album and one can't deny it's importance. It also marks the time when their most famous bass player Lemmy would join the band. Even though he is not on he original album, he was made a member of the band right after the album was released and he does appear on all three bonus tracks on the 1996 remastered CD version of the album. Owning the version of the remastered album is worth considering as the bonus tracks are all quite strong and fit right in well with the rest of the album even if they are a bit heavier than the other tracks and less jam- centric.

You Shouldn't Do That - This is a fifteen minute long space jam that shows the band using krautrock, psychedelic and space rock influences right from the beginning of the album. Right away, the listener will notice the difference between this album (which would also mark where the band would go with it's sound forever more) and the previous one. No blues influence is apparent here. The long jam never changes the key and even barely changes chords except for some sections that do some quick chord changes. The vocals are quite garbled and there is a repeated chant that sounds off over and over while the undecipherable and somewhat monotone singing goes on. But for the most part, this is quite a nice, spacey foray and would create the niche that Hawkwind would create and stay in for the rest of its long life.

You Know You're Only Dreaming - Dave Brock, the main force behind Hawkwind, has stated that The Steve Miller Band was a big influence on him. Of course, he was talking about Steve Miller's psychedelic years, the years that most of the public don't know about. This track takes inspiration from Miller's crazy psych tune 'Jackson-Kent Blues' by using the main riff and retaining the tone of the song, heavy and totally unlike anything Miller would become famous for in later years. The vocals this time are quite a bit clearer, and the spooky descending background 'ooooooo's are straight from Miller's song, along with a lot of the psychedelic effects in the guitar. Interestingly enough, this is less progressive than Steve Miller's own song as it melts into another one-chord krautrock style jam. Nik Turner's saxophone and flute effects push the instrumental section forward.

Master of the Universe - Nik Turner does the lead vocals on this one, the only track on the album that has a space theme. The lyrics follow the belief that humans are the central most important being in the universe. The verses are separated by a guitar riff which the rest of the band builds off of. Synth and treated sax give it all a kooky, spacey feel during the long instrumental section. The band breaks a bit more away from the single chord jam this time around by utilizing a simple ascending chord progression based off of the main riff.

We Took the Wrong Step Years Ago - This is the first track to stay under 5 minutes. The verse sections are accompanied by a 12 string acoustic guitar while the synths play out their usual spacey effects. The melody is much more accessible than most of the music on the album.

Adjust Me - This is an instrumental track taken from a jam session.

Children of the Sun - Another short acoustic guitar-led song with some electric embellishments towards the end.

The 1996 remastered CD would also include three more tracks:

Seven By Seven - This one is a non-album b-side that was recorded a little bit later as are all of the bonus tracks. The riff for this track comes from another band called 'Leviathan' called 'Flames'. This one has some warbly, spooky sounding synths. Robert Calvert, who would work more extensively with the band on subsequent albums, guests on vocals and also, by the time of the recording of all three of the bonus tracks, Lemmy (later of Motorhead fame) plays bass and Simon King has also replaced Terry Ollis on drums and plays on all three of the bonus tracks. It's actually a pretty good track and the playing seems much tighter here especially in the last half of the track.

Silver Machine - This is the A-side to the previous bonus track and features Lemmy on the lead vocals. This one is also a non-album track. Though the single was unheard of in North America, it actually did a decent job in the UK and generated enough money to completely fund the band's third album. The guitar is quite heavy in this track, as could be expected, and the effects are very prominent throughout.

Born to Go - This bonus track is also a non-album track recorded live. This particular version is an edit which was used on a single. This does a swell job of portraying the heaviness of the band when playing live.

Though it's not their best album, it is the most important step that the band would take in their history establishing their sound which would create and influence many space rock bands that would follow in its wake. Hawkwind would continue to experience turbulence in the band line-ups and this would be a curse to them through their history, but the band would continue to grow so that by their next album 'Doremi Fasol Latido' they would be making important and essential space prog.

 Warrior on the Edge of Time by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.09 | 679 ratings

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Warrior on the Edge of Time
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars It's already a tradition: another album and another line-up change. This time Hawkwind's ranks were left by Del Dettmar, who was responsible for electronic sounds. No successor was sought for him, as Dave Brock and Simon House had already performed some of the keyboards. A second drummer, Alan Powell, was added to the line-up. Michael Moorcock, British author of fantasy and science fiction novels, who wrote several texts, and some of them also recited, also made a guest appearance in the creation of "Warrior on the Edge of Time". It was also the last session with Lemmy. The bassist was kicked out of the line-up during the tour promoting this album. From the literary point of view, "Warrior On The Edge Of Time" is quite a loose adaptation of the novel "Eternal Champion" by the above-mentioned author.

The band has clearly grown up in terms of sound. The whole album sounds very 'full' and thoughtful. In many moments it is nothing more than a symphonic arrangement of the best elements of the band's style. On "Warrior On The Edge Of Time" Hawkwind loses nothing of its old strengths, and gains pomposity and the 'plasticity' close to progressive rock.

Hall and Warrior are actually two sonorically similar discs, decidedly less hard than Doremi and much more refined than In Search of Space, but above all, they are characterized by those vivid and genuine bases on which keyboards and synths are grafted to create great atmospheres. acid-space.

The opening piece, "Assault And Battery, Part 1" draws inspiration from Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's poem "Psalm Off Life". The games of keyboards and flutes give the song a strong space rock connotation, at the same time the vocal lines of Dave Brock seem to have been born almost in a state of trance, a real journey with the mind in a trip of distant galaxies and universes. "The Wizard Blew His Horn", "Warriors" and "Standing at the Edge" are short and recited songs, the lyrics are taken from the works of the famous writer Michael Moorcock and his legendary saga of the Eternal Champion. In the first two songs the writer himself lends his voice, here there are no real vocal lines, the narration takes place while keyboards and mellotron play with their spatial effects. Very suggestive "Opa-Loka", an entirely instrumental song halfway between space rock and psychedelia, the constant rhythm and drums are perfect for expanding the senses during a listening in a state of semi- consciousness, the Hawkwind make the listener taste a strong dose of musical drug, instead of weed or pills, here it is the music that stuns and creates a sort of inner trance. With "The Demented Man" we return to earth, slow and sweet melodies this time relax us, there is a touch of Pink Floyd in the song, but the personality of Brock and his companions remains strong and present. Back to travel in the galaxies, "Spiral Galaxy 28948" reaches very high peaks of inspiration, this instrumental has the magnificence of a soundtrack and atmospheres worthy of the best space rock.

"Warrior on the Edge of Time" closes a certain period in the work of this band, which is still active today. This is one of Hawkwind's best, and maybe even the best, studio achievement. Because even if not all the fragments convince me the same, in the context of the whole, even they seem to make sense and fit perfectly here, precisely in the places where they appear. It is not just a collection of random recordings, but a very coherent album.

 Hall of the Mountain Grill by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1974
3.99 | 468 ratings

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Hall of the Mountain Grill
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars An important change takes place in the line-up compared to the previous full length album, with the entry of Simon House to synthesizers, electric violin and mellotron and the simultaneous exit of Robert Calvert, who will return to the band starting from "Astounding Sounds , Amazing Music ". "Hall Of The Mountain Grill", whose title comes from a tribute both to the famous orchestral composition "In The Hall Of The Mountain King", as to a more prosaic a café-bar located in Portobello Road and called "The Mountain Grill", not only confirms the talents already shown, but allows itself to explore new horizons.

"Hall Of The Mountain Grill" is a slightly softer than the "Doremi Fasol Latido". It may seem that the band's sound has not changed significantly, and the album does not sound any different either, but the band begins to reach for some musical elements, thanks to which they shyly shift to the path of classic progressive rock - Not surprisingly, it presents itself from the first listening as a much more "structured" album than its immediate predecessors. The musical center of gravity of the group seems to move away from the "non-song form" of the inextinguishable and fantastic cosmic jams, to be brought back into more traditional sound frameworks, built on the orderly alternation of verses and choruses. Furthermore, starting from this record, the Hawkwind sound is characterized by a decidedly more symphonic and orchestral cut: Brock's guitar almost seems to want to stay in the rear to make room for melodic instruments, he prefers to be dilated and diluted by the delay, to focus on softer distortions on a less aggressive riffing.

The newcomer Simon House does not take long to make his stand, giving a short and incisive interlude of keyboards and piano (the title track Hall of the Mountain Grill) and above all soft keyboard arrangements along the full length.

The album will be opened by "The Psychedelic Warlords (Disappear In Smoke)". A great, driving number that would most likely fit on one of the two previous albums. The track is driving, spherical and has an insane groove. And then the piece goes into your ears incredibly quickly. This song is really good, because all this "sound" is accompanied by a really "working" saxophone. This song, is not really psychedelic, but all the more hypnotizing. With the next track it is now a little crazy, which is not necessarily due to the music of the next piece, but to the nature of the music. "Wind Of Change" is a copy of Pink Floyd's "A Saucerful Of Secrets". "A Saucerful Of Secrets" consists of three parts and the last part was copied here, which begins with a kind of rumble of thunder and then develops into one of Pink Floyd's most "floating" songs. And with "Wind Of Change" it also starts with a rumble of thunder and a fat keyboard carpet, just like the original. Then a chant consisting of "Aaaahs" develops. And now comes the variation. Hawkwind now uses a violin and gives the piece an additional touch. I've never objected to great music being imitated. And here it becomes too - but fortunately also a little varied. The whole thing sounds beautifully psychedelic and melodic with Hawkwind. "D-Rider" has again, the spacey tones typical of Hawkwind. But this time, the song is more melodic. The melody is accompanied by a choir sound . "Web Weaver", following that, now presents itself as an acoustic number, mainly instrumented with guitar and piano. The synthesizer tones don't play the main role here, but they underline the mood nicely. Only towards the end of the piece does it get a little more experimental and "wacky". "You'd Better Believe It" starts out very strangely at first, with a tone generated on the synthesizer. Then finally the bass, electric guitar, drums and, ultimately, the vocals set in. A driving number develops again, in which Simon House can repeatedly contribute with his violin. The piece seems very spherical and spacey again in the further course, so that the genre could not be better described than space rock. This is followed by the title track "Hall Of The Mountain Grill". The song is a beautiful piano number, the likes of which Hawkwind has never heard of before. This number creates a very special atmosphere that ranges from gloomy to wistful. Truly an asset to the record. Again symphonies in the title track, based on an elegant introductory piano tour, which flows into a capital dialogue of strings, full of epic majesty and a spirit of adventure towards an imaginative elsewhere. Flashes of quiet, therefore, before the track that, in hindsight, will mark the first embryo of the Motörhead sound. The tornado that will soon overwhelm the entire musical scene of the time still cannot be guessed, true, but Lemmy's voice and his thick and voluminous bass are enough to bring out glimpses of the sound to come. "

Goat Willow" is a short interlude, before another heavy caliber: "Paradox" pushes to the maximum on irregular and powerful rhythms, unconventional arrangements and search for the perfect sidereal note, a fascinating and still in many ways indecipherable album closes, a manifesto of the inestimable suggestive power of the deep space explorers named Hawkwind.

 Doremi Fasol Latido by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.76 | 357 ratings

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Doremi Fasol Latido
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by kornhelius

4 stars I have known Hawkwind for years without listening to none the band records. I only bought forty years ago an 7" of Motorhead (the song and a must have on UA records) and this was sufficient until I got some records along the years (garage sells, flea markets and other strange places). As for Doremi ..., I bought the Back on Black Rock Classic reissue, with the 4 CD bonus tracks of 1996. According to my own rates of stoner, acid and psychedelic music, this album enters the progressive classification rather than others. Not enough heavy for stoner, not really acid in an american way, not psyche like UK bands definite it, the heaviness of the rhythm section is lighted by the production, which allows the right place to acoustic guitars, flutes and others. The electronics part add the milky way color that flies along most of the tracks. The single version edit of Lord of light with the Ozzy sounding voice is the perfect epitome of Hawkwind repertoire and something I listen very often. It's a shame the band is not enough known for the good mix of acoustic and electric, like here. Many tracks like ejection remind me of Monster Magnet the true spiritual son oh H, don(t you agree ? How many stars to conclude ? No less that 3, no more than 4, it's up to you Prog Archives to complete this first contribution.
 Hawkwind by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.40 | 298 ratings

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Hawkwind
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars Hawkwind's strength, even from the beginning, was their live performances. Did the band know this in the beginning? Probably not, but it didn't take long for them to learn. It all started when Dave Brock and Mick Slattery decided to leave the band they were both in at the time, have a meeting with John Harrison, and then decide to embark in a new direction because of their love of electronic music. Before they knew what was happening, Terry Ollis, who was 17 years old at the time, replied to an ad they had put out for a drummer, and Nik Turner and Michael Davies ("Dik Mik"), acquaintances of Brock who were in it at first to be "roadies" of a sort, were instead recruited into the band also. They performed at a local talent night going on stage without a name or material, and decided to call themselves "Group X" and play a cover of "Eight Miles High" which ended up in a 20 minute long jam. They were discovered that night because John Peel was in the audience.

So, they were given time, because of that incident, to go into a studio and record demos, which they did under the name of "Hawkwind Zoo". Right after that, Slattery left the band and Brock brought in another acquaintance Huw Lloyd-Langton. Work began on the debut album, and, as usual, the goal was to make it a studio album with all the kinks worked out. The album didn't sell very well, but it did get the band noticed in the UK underground. Little did they know that they, in the process, had become one of the first space rock bands and that this album would become a guidepost as to how it would be done. Yes, the band had taken some cues from Pink Floyd, and it is probably more apparent in this album than most of their others, but their style was different in that PF used more of a structure which was built off of improvisation, where Hawkwind would use improvisation around a structure. Plus Hawkwind also utilized a more conventional (well, in most cases anyway) style instead of the one based more around contemporary classical styles like PF did.

The one thing that makes this album stand out from the other Hawkwind albums, is that it is about the music, not necessarily the themes built around science fiction stories or spoken word passages, which would be part to of the refinement the band would go through on their 2nd album. Right off the bat, though, Brock pretty much took the reigns as the guy in charge, writing, or at least taking top credit, of the songs. Dick Taylor was brought in to produce and what not, but ended up also contributing some guitar on this album, so, in all, there were 8 members in the band performing on the album. The aim of the album was to send the listeners on a trip without the use of drugs. Listening to the album, you can understand what a risk it was for it's time, but it worked to the band's benefit, even if it isn't the band's best album, one cannot deny that it was important.

Most of the album is improvisational free-form freakout. Yet, interestingly enough, it starts off with a track that is one of the least like anything else they did. "Hurry on Sundown" is a great introductory track for the band, even if it is closer to a blues-oriented track than a psychedelic one. The harmonica riffs stick out immediately to one who is somewhat familiar with other albums by the band. But, the beat has a steadiness that would be indicative of a lot of their space rock jam songs. The sound is nice, poppy and sunshiny and ends with an extended instrumental coda. However, after this one, things start to sound closer to the typical Hawkwind sound. "The Reason Is?" slips right into psychedelia being quite atmospheric and mysterious, moving along for a few minutes before a meandering guitar joins in. The track works well as a intermezzo of sorts, taking us into the 8-minute long "Be Yourself", more of a jam piece formed off of the foundation of a short three chord sequence that the vocal melody also follows. This gets to be a bit redundant until the extended jam section kicks in which features a fast moving rhythm section and begins with improvisation from Brocks sax, morphs into a guitar improvisation, and then switches into a focus on the rhythm section with guitar screeches and scratches and spooky drones rising and falling (in tone), only to eventually return to the redundant three chord sequence at the end. The last track on side one is "Paranoia, Pt. 1", a short piece that builds quickly in intensity and then suddenly ends when it sounds like someone pulled the plug on the phonograph. This is to signal that the side is over.

The 2nd side starts with "Paranoia, Pt. 2", where, on the vinyl edition, sounds like the player was plugged back in, and the track continues. Or does it? What might have seemed like an introduction to this part, is anything but. It is light in lyrics, but heavy in tension, the effects carry the alternating chords which the guitar builds off of and slowly picking up speed and steam while a descending drone screeches underneath it all. It slows down again and crawls along to the end. This slides into "Seeing It As You Really Are", the longest track at 10 minutes. This one takes it's sweet time, as it is more improvisation from the band, set against gradually changing tempos and crazy effects; squealing, groaning, tortured instruments and even vocalization effects. It's not until 8 minutes in that the guitar and sax take turns trying to make sense out of everything, but end up fighting each other until everything ends in a noisy and chaotic conclusion. The last track "Mirror of Illusion" proves that it is a part of the bookend set (along with the first track) with a more traditional sounding rock track, but not as straightforward as the first track. There is a nice extended guitar solo that bridges the 2nd and 3rd verses, but, just in case, there are still a lot of spacey effects going on nonetheless.

This ended the album proper in 1970. The band felt pretty good about it, and, overtime, have come to recognize it for it's riskiness and it's importance in establishing the space rock genre. In 1996, the remastered CD contained 4 bonus tracks. The first of these is "Bring It On Home" which is not really a Hawkwind track at all, but it is a cover done by Dave Brock before Hawkwind existed. It's a fun track, quite well done, with more harmonica which ends up tying in "Hurry on Sundown" to the entire experience. The singing is well pronounced also, which is not something you hear much in future Hawkwind albums. The next two tracks are from the Hawkwind Zoo EP that I mentioned in the beginning. First is a demo version of "Hurry On Sundown", which is still quite a decent version, actually sounding more like the Hawkwind most of us are familiar with than the version on the original album. This is followed by another demo of the rare track recorded in the same sessions "Kiss of the Velvet Whip" (otherwise known as ''Sweet Mistress of Pain"). This one is also quite enjoyable, not sounding much at all like a demo, and also a bit more commercial than what we are used to hearing from them. The last track is "Cymbaline", and yes it is a cover of the Pink Floyd song from their soundtrack album to "More". The vocals are actually more straightforward and clearer than the PF version, but as it continues, it starts to sound more amateurish and messy, so the PF version wins out here. It's still interesting to hear it anyway.

The 4 bonus tracks really help round out the album, even though they do take away from the psychedelic nature of the album, but they are great to hear anyway because it is a peek into their earliest days. Unfortunately, a lot of this line- up would not survive into the next album, and the studio wanted to push towards a more commercial sound (which they wouldn't really get anyway). Harrison would leave the band because of the increased use of drugs among the other members which he didn't use. Lloyd-Langton would also leave at this time because of a bad LSD trip which caused a nervous breakdown (he would return later though). Dik Mik also left, but came back for the next album after he was replaced by Del Dettmar, so they ended up with two electronics players. All of this was an early sign of the constant changing line-ups that the band would experience. It's amazing, though, that the band was able to stay together as long as they have through the years, and even though the quality of their albums would always be up and down through the years, they usually stayed true to their sound. This album was the beginning of it all, though, and even if it was their first effort, it was still quite strong and influential enough to be used as a blueprint to the genre.

 Doremi Fasol Latido by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.76 | 357 ratings

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Doremi Fasol Latido
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

5 stars It's 1972, and Hawkwind has only a mere 3 albums. I wonder if they knew how long their legacy would go on. Most of their albums charted in the UK, while only two did in the US. Their UK success is what kept them going, for better or worse. But, lets not get ahead of ourselves. The time we're interested in, in our fancy little aluminum foil space-time capsule is 1972, and the band at the time were mere fledglings, well, pretty much.

Their third album, "Doremi Fasol Latido" would basically be the one to really kick off their string of great albums. Even though their previous album saw them hit number 18 on the UK charts, this album would raise that number a few notches, and a lot of the reason for the increasing popularity was bringing in two new members of the band; Lemmy on bass (who of course would go on to become the lead singer for Motorhead), and Simon King on drums. Most people know that Lemmy's time with the band was short (only until 1975), but King would end up being a regular member for quite a while (until 1980), however, this line-up would be mostly responsible for the band's best albums. Another newbie to the band was Robert Calvert, who contributed with occasional vocals and such through the history of the band. He would not be on every album, but was sort of a guest star who would appear from time to time hereafter. Beyond this, we have as returning members, Dave Brock, the one main staple of the band through the years, on guitars and most lead vocals; Nik Turner (who stayed until 1984 with a temporary break between '76 and '82) on sax flute and vocals; Dik Mik (or Michael Davies who stayed until 1973) on synth and Del Dettmar (who left the band in 1974) on synth. The band was only in for 3 albums thus far, and already they were in a state of constant flux. But for the time being, they were relatively stable.

Lemmy thought he was to replace the previous 2nd guitarist Huw Lloyd-Langton when he came into the band, but Brock decided he would be the only guitarist, so Lenny took the bassist position when the old bass player failed to show up. Lemmy got thrown into the band hardly even knowing what a bass guitar was, and said he just treated it like a "deep guitar". King, on the other hand, had a different drumming style than the previous drummer, as King had a more rock style where Ollis, the previous drummer, was more of a jazz style.

The album was recorded in a barn and the band used mattresses on the walls to make it all more "studio-like". Tapes from long jam sessions were made and then were cut up and spliced together to make a track out of it while other overdubs were made to put it all together or joined together by synthesizer riffs. The original version of the album had 7 tracks, 3 on side one and 4 on side two. When the remastered CD came out, 4 bonus tracks were added to this.

The album starts out with the epic space rock classic "Brainstorm" written by Nik Turner. Nik was known as the member that provided the best jam tunes and sessions. The track was originally made for a live appearance on the Johnnie Walker show and has since been changed often for live shows and re-recorded in various forms, but has remained a staple for concerts at almost every show. Starting with the usual echoing vocals, this original studio version is a bit rough, but that is the sound that the band would become famous for, the long, one-chord space jams with a guitar riff supporting improvised guitar and synth riffs. The track ends up taking up more than half of the first side of the album. If you want to hear the beginnings of space rock from the band that made it popular, this is the track to hear. "Space is Deep" is written by Brock with lyrics based on a poem called "Black Corridor", which is written by the band's go-to author Michael Moorcock. For the vocal sections of the track, both Brock and Lemmy provide acoustic guitars and vocals while spacey effects swirl around. As the song goes into the long instrumental section, the entire band comes in for another electronic space jam. In the track, the electric guitars slowly take over the acoustics, and we enter into a two-chord rock-out psychedelic jam, this time much shorter than the previous track, and then the acoustics fade back in retaining some odd guitar effects before tying the track together. This side ends with a short instrumental keyboard track by Del Dettmar.

For the 2nd side of the album, the next 3 tracks are all written by Brock. It starts with the eerie sounds of the 7 minute "Lord of Light" which soon finds its footing with a heavy guitar and bass riff that eventually bring in the vocals, complete with the usual echo effects. This track would become a single which was released in Germany. In the single edit, the time is cut almost in half, retaining mostly the vocal sections, which were more radio friendly than the long jam which includes the heavy guitars and some nice flute riffage by Turner. As is the case with most of Hawkwind's tracks, none of the instruments stick out as the soloing instruments are usually mixed evenly with the background creating that space rock wall of sound. At the time, this style was rather unheard of in the US and went against everything that was popular there. Now, however, it is the style that the many space rock bands rely on.

"Down Through the Night" continues the previous track, but breaks down the sound wall a bit with another acoustic performance surrounded by spacey effects and flute swashes. Regular vocals with reversed vocal effects layered in come in later. Another space jam follows with the almost 9 minute "Time We Left This World Today". A heavy guitar riff is established and repeated while almost chanted vocals repeat over and over with a sort of call and answer between Brock and the band. This track pushes forward in a relentless heavy walking tempo, and various sax and flute sounds are thrown in. The whole thing comes together in a funky, guitar scratching miasma of sound that is more psychedelic and experimental while the vocalists continue to shout out indiscernible words. The shouts finally quit and the band continues with its jam. This is the heaviest track on the album and at times it becomes quite intense with the guitars and the bass fighting for top spot here. The last track on the original album is "The Watcher", the first track written by Lemmy for Hawkwind. This one is quite psychedelic sounding, though it is much quieter as it consists of Lemmy singing and playing acoustic. He would later re- record the track with Motorhead.

The CD reissue then adds 4 bonus tracks to the album starting with the UK single "Urban Guerrilla", which was written and sung by Calvert. Since the lyrics at the time were quite controversial, the single was pulled after 3 weeks. The song ended up creating an urban legend that Nik Turner's flat was raided searching for bombs, but the raid ended up having to do with some motorcycle club members wanted for murder. The song is a great rocker and definitely add to the album. So does the B-side to this non-album single, "Brainbox Pollution" and both of these tracks fit on the album nicely. This B-side has a longer instrumental section and features layers of sax along with the guitars. The "Lord of Light" single mix is next and this version trims off about half of the original version. Last, but not least is a previously unreleased version of "Ejection".

This is one case when the added tracks on the reissue makes a great Hawkwind album even better, where the added material is all as good or better than the material on the original album. Overall, however, this is Hawkwind at its best as the band works together and will continue to do so for several years after. This album marks the beginning of their best output, the years when they were at their best and when their music would have the most influence. This is a definite must have for space rock lovers and for Hawkwind lovers, plus it is a valuable album as far as being an influential record even today.

 Distant Horizons by HAWKWIND album cover Studio Album, 1997
3.26 | 61 ratings

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Distant Horizons
Hawkwind Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

4 stars The year is 1997 and Hawkwind is still releasing albums. Two years after their last studio album 'Alien 4', the band, now reduced to a quartet, put out their 21st album 'Distant Horizons'. Of course, Dave Brock is there on electric guitar, keyboards and vocals. Jerry Richards started touring with the band in 1996 and became a core member and furnishes some of his own electric guitar on the album. He would remain a regular member until 2002. Ron Tree also joined the band in 1996 and makes his album debut providing vocals and also bass, taking the place of Alan Davey, who was the bands bassist since 1985 and who left the band because he didn't like the direction the band was heading at the time. Davey would come back in 2002 and would reciprocate by replace Ron Tree. Last of all, Richard Chadwick would be there on drums. Chadwick has been with the band consistently since 1988 and still is still a current member.

So, in summary, we have two long-time members and two fairly new members in the band for this album. During the touring for this album, two more members would join the band that are not present on 'Distant Horizons': Rastafarian Captain Rizz and keyboardist Julian 'Crum' Crimmins. (It would be this 6 person line-up that would participate in the studio/live album 'In Your Area' that would be released a year later.) So the big question for this album is, how would the band fare without Davey and with two fairly new members contributing?

Brock would write and sing most of the tracks on the album, but there would also be contributions with Chadwick, though his writing credits are always shared; 2 with Brock and 2 with Richards, and with 2 tracks credited solely to Tree. The album starts off with the title track and it reflects the trance-like sound that the band was chasing at the time. This sound was the main reason why Davey decided to leave the band. However, Hawkwind even during this stage of their career, still hung onto the overall space rock sound they pioneered, and Brock and Richards still make sure there are plenty of spacey guitar solos that join in to the trance beat that play underneath everything. The sound of vocal recordings are all there too, giving the long- time fans the sound they were familiar with.

'Phetamine Street' follows with a more organic sound, and it is surprisingly one of the Tree-penned tracks. The guitar hook combined with the catchy drum and percussion effects turn this into a very intriguing and infectious sound. It is almost as if Brock's 'Waimea Canyon Drive' can't hold any steam or really much interest as it moves back to a trance style, and just sort of meanders about aimlessly. This is even made more evident as the powerful guitars of 'Alchemy', credited to Richards and Chadwick, come blaring out of your speakers with a rousing guitar solo. However, Brock's 'Clouded Vision' sounds much better and has more focus, even though it is a more pensive track. The vocals are also more up front which also helps. Tree then follows up with his answer to the previous track with a powerful and lively 'Reptoid Vision' that has a much darker and heavier sense to it. It is also one of the longer tracks on the album and it goes into a great exploratorial and progressive instrumental break that brings back memories of the older Hawkwind. Really, the only weak track on this first half of the album is 'Waimea''. The rest of the album to this point is really turning out to be one of the bands best efforts in quite a while.

There are a few more longer tracks that follow now, and they are really the strength of this album. 'Population Overload', credited to Brock and Chadwick, is a decent track, but seems to be a bit direction-less. A lot of the time is spent in a more ambient, meandering style even though the rhythm is fairly constant. 'Wheels' is credited to Richards and Chadwick, and the differences are almost obvious as, strangely enough, the tracks that are more Hawkwind-like are the ones that are not credited to Brock. This one has a more driving, space rock style to it and some great guitar licks later on. The last two tracks are both credited to Brock. 'Kauai / Taxi for Max' is a nice, atmospheric synth piece in the beginning that later turns into a sound collage of effects. 'Love in Space' finishes things off with a soft keyboard heavy track that goes down rather smoothly, but doesn't necessarily give you the punch you might want to end an album off with.

This album is one of the band's better efforts during this long spell of mediocre attempts. There is a lot of different styles and textures here that actually sounds like a decent attempt to make the band relevant again, even though the weakest tracks on the albums are Brock's. It sounds like there could have been some hope for the band with this line up. Unfortunately, the follow up album 'In Your Area' wouldn't give the level of satisfaction that this album would, and after that, Brock released an album (Spacebrock) under the Hawkwind name that many end up considering a Brock solo album more than a Hawkwind album. This would be the beginning of a long dry spell, and we wouldn't hear from the band again until 2005 with the awful comeback album 'Take Me to Your Leader'.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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