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ROGER WATERS

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Roger Waters biography
George Roger Waters - Born 6 September 1943 (Great Bookham, Cambridge, UK)

Roger WATERS' musical career took off when he joined the band PINK FLOYD in 1965 along with highschool friend Syd BARRETT. After BARRETT's drug problems got him kicked out of the band, WATERS became the primary creative force, and thanks to such inspirations as his father who died in World War 2 before they could ever meet, his strongly left wing political views, and his ex-bandmate BARRETT, he went on to compose such masterwork concept albums as "Dark Side of the Moon", "Wish You Were Here", "Animals" and "The Wall" during his time with the band. However, by 1983 when the band completed "The Final Cut", he had taken total control, and guitarist David GILMOUR wasn't going to take it. The two began to fight feverishly, eventually resulting in WATERS quitting the band thinking they could never go on without him. They did however, leaving him to his own solo career. Roger's solo music bares striking resemblance to the final few albums he did with PINK FLOYD, in that it is very dark and driven by a concept. Any fans of "The Wall" or "The Final Cut" would do well to give his solo work a listen.

Roger's solo career actually dates back to 1970 when he worked with avant-garde composer Ron Geesin on the soundtrack to the film "The Body". His first real solo album came in 1985 with the brilliant "Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking" though. This is an essencial album for fans of his later work with PINK FLOYD, although some may find it a bit boring and overly personal (it's based on a dream he had, and touches on almost all of his typical themes in his lyrics). In 1987 he contributed music to the film "When the Wind Blows", and also created another concept album in "Radio K.A.O.S.". This is the least essencial of his solo albums, and is really plagued by the horrible 80s sound that was dominating music at the time. That said, it still has some bright spots, and is by no means a weak album. His next solo work didn't come until 1992's "Amused To Death". Many consider this his best, and it is without question his most political album ever. None of these are particularlily accessible, so it couldn't hurt to just go from the beginning and start with "The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking" if interested in his work, though you can't go wrong with "Amused To Death" either (that is, if yo...
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ROGER WATERS discography


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ROGER WATERS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.84 | 128 ratings
Roger Waters & Ron Geesin: Music From The Body (OST)
1970
3.06 | 355 ratings
The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking
1984
2.97 | 270 ratings
Radio K.A.O.S.
1987
3.93 | 490 ratings
Amused to Death
1992
3.36 | 114 ratings
Ça Ira
2005
3.74 | 217 ratings
Is This the Life We Really Want?
2017
4.67 | 3 ratings
Igor Stravinsky's The Soldier's Tale
2018

ROGER WATERS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.25 | 115 ratings
The Wall - Live in Berlin
1990
3.61 | 165 ratings
In the Flesh - Live
2000
3.60 | 38 ratings
The Wall (The Soundtrack From A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
2015

ROGER WATERS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.14 | 71 ratings
The Wall Live in Berlin
1990
2.64 | 17 ratings
What God Wants, Part I (VHS)
1992
4.29 | 153 ratings
In the Flesh (DVD)
2001
3.63 | 45 ratings
The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
2015
4.04 | 9 ratings
Us + Them
2020

ROGER WATERS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.62 | 56 ratings
Flickering Flame - The Solo Years 1
2002
3.48 | 16 ratings
The Roger Waters Collection (7CD + DVD)
2011

ROGER WATERS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 3 ratings
Every Strangers Eyes
1984
2.33 | 3 ratings
The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking
1984
3.86 | 7 ratings
The Tide Is Turning (After Live Aid)
1987
3.00 | 3 ratings
Who Needs Information
1987
2.67 | 3 ratings
Sunset Strip
1987
2.21 | 20 ratings
Radio Waves (EP)
1987
2.19 | 7 ratings
The Wall - Berlin '90 - Commemorative EP
1990
4.18 | 11 ratings
What God Wants, Part I
1992
4.00 | 13 ratings
The Bravery Of Being Out Of Range
1992
4.30 | 10 ratings
Three Wishes
1992
3.26 | 38 ratings
To Kill the Child / Leaving Beirut
2004
3.71 | 7 ratings
Hello (I Love You)
2007
1.50 | 2 ratings
We Shall Overcome
2010
3.89 | 18 ratings
Smell the Roses
2017

ROGER WATERS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Us + Them by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 2020
4.04 | 9 ratings

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Us + Them
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

4 stars This show has been released in cinema a long time ago and it took many months to hit the record store on physical media. The disk case is not bigger than a post-card. After the release of ''The Wall Live'' concert we knew that the production would be similar with giants screens in the back and even in the middle of the venue. The setlist covers mostly ''Dark Side of the Moon'' which has been played a lot by many tribute bands in the last 20 years, but this time Roger added some songs from ''Animals'' which is a welcome addition. Also, he played 3 songs from his latest solo album, but I guess that most people were there for the Pink Floyd songs. The sound clarity and the picture are excellent, but I didn't enjoy how they use the light show with mostly red and white spots. There is a good use of the sound of explosions for special effects with projections on the screens.

Roger Waters signing and playing is still lively and we can see him signing outside his microphone. The signing from other musicians is struggling at times. But when the music is so good, you can tolerate some flaws in the vocal department. Roger Waters didn't speak between songs and kept his political message for the love of humanity at the end. This concert was recorded in surround which adds some value to the overall experience.

 The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans) by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 2015
3.63 | 45 ratings

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The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by iluvmarillion

3 stars The Pink Floyd rock opera, The Wall, whose themes of abandonment and isolation are explored through a character called Pink, are appropriated by Roger Waters through a personal journal to follow the last traces of his father, who died in the Second World War in battle for Cassino in Italy. Unsurprisingly the two align since Waters wrote the original lyrics to The Wall. The character Pink, a Rockstar whose star is fading, is alienated from his fans, so goes into a form of self-imposed exile where he substance abuses. He eventually comes out the other side after he abandons his self- isolation. The symbol of this self-isolation is a wall that society erects to protect it's own citizens, but is overtly used to seal itself from the truths of it's own folly. The collapse of Communism in the East Europe in the eighties, associated by the fall of the Berlin Wall, bore the venue for Roger's celebrated 1990 concert which raised money for the Memorial Relief fund charity.

Roger Waters seeks to address his abandonment by his father by journeying to Cassino to pay his respect at his father's grave site. The picturesque site of the hills of Cassino are a perfect place to build the memorial and it is very moving to watch the solitary figure of Roger take a trumpet out of his car and play tribute to his father.

The documentary is cleverly interspersed with the concert performance of The Wall in such a way as to not disturb the flow of the concert. Roger Waters is a master at using silences to highlight the musical nuances within a song. Despite that I would have preferred the documentary to be played before or after the concert, not during it.

A superb cast of musicians have been assembled to play the concert. You couldn't get better guitarists than Dave Kilminster and Snowy White. Multi-instrumentalist Jon Carin shares keyboard duties with Roger's son, Harry Waters. And Graham Broad on drums and percussion has been featuring with Roger Waters since the nineteen eighties. Roger Waters does most of the singing and hasn't lost his touch on voice. He has a chorus of singers including a boys' choir to support him.

The concert itself is a visual feast of lasers and lights, very theatrical, with screen projections of attacking aeroplanes and huge life size floating blimps. Marching Nazi like troops join the stage with Roger firing a toy machine gun over the heads of the audience. As the band plays, a gigantic cardboard brick wall is built around and over the heads of the performers until it reaches a point where most of the musicians are concealed behind the wall. Then after performing the finale song, The Trial, Roger screams at the audience to tear down the wall and the whole thing comes down.

How does this concert performance compare with Pink Floyd's studio album of The Wall? Basically, I think the two support each other. Neither is perfect. This one is longer. Many of the songs are stretched. Others are shortened. The last side of the Pink Floyd album drags a bit after the song Run Like Hell. In Roger's version the wailing sirens of Run Like Hell gives the song more expression and leads to a more fulfilling conclusion when the wall comes down. The first part of Roger's version is impressive as well. From In The Flesh to Mother, through the middle chorus of Another Brick In The Wall, it moves more freely. Where it can't compete is side 3 of the Floyd album from the opening Hey You to Comfortably Numb. While Dave Kilminster performs a great guitar solo on Comfortably Numb there is nobody who can play this solo as well as Dave Gilmour.

 Amused to Death by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.93 | 490 ratings

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Amused to Death
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by mariorockprog

4 stars 3.75: After hearing the surprisingly really good is this the life we really want, and seeing the high scores it has, i wanted to give it other try to this one (I was avoiding it) only to discover is the same thing he was doing in his previous last albums but in his best version. very pretentious and political, and with antiwar lyrics. Musically I only liked God wants part 1, Bravery of being out of range , watching tv , three wishes and amused to death.Sounds like animals and the wall combined. Really great work in the guitars for some of the songs. I didnt like most of the lyrics, but the second part of the album, has some deep thoughts and interesting things to say. Supposedly the concept is about aliens arriving to the earth and seeing monkeys watching tv amused for the death that is happening. I was surprised with his deteriorated voice even in 1990. The classic style of criticizing anything and trying to convince of thinking in his way as always is presence, classic girls singing at the background. One of the things that i dont like of Waters music is that is so repetitive, makes a good tunes and want to divide it a lot of parts with only different lyrics, the same exact music is recycled, nothing spectacular, and turns to be most repetitive. Jeff beck is the most known participant of the thousand collaborator. Finally, is a good album, it has really good moments but also there are a few mediocre songs, an excellent addition, however I will recommended it most to the people that liked his work.
 Is This the Life We Really Want? by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.74 | 217 ratings

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Is This the Life We Really Want?
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by mariorockprog

4 stars 4: the last album by Roger Waters until now in 2019, and I think is really his last album because he already said the most probably isn't going to do any other tour. I have to recognize that I am not a big fan of Waters, I think most of the pink floyd fans don't like when he began to turn political and in his previous work he was very repetitive, also I consider him very arrogant person and even he was a genius in Pink Floyd with his creativity in lyrics and concepts and the way he sung, he always needed of the band to make good music, proof of that is all his other records. Thankfully, in this record he amended himself, doing the album most Pink Floyd seemingly of any solo career (I am missing to hear Wrights work). Finally, his lyrics and ideas get combined with really good music. If I have to describe in terms of PF albums, It sounds reminiscent to Dark side of the Moon and the Wall. His voice is not in his best moment, but it is a good effort. The songs that I really enjoyed were: Smell the Roses, Picture that, Bird in a Gale and Part of me died. The other ones are good too but nothing especial. Finally, a really good album, the most similar to the Floyd era, despite its little faults, and excellent addition to any prog collection.
 The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 1984
3.06 | 355 ratings

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The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

3 stars The ever fascinating drama that was Pink Floyd faced a new chapter around the time that "The Wall" was created. After amassing unthinkable success during the 70s with one classic album and world tour after another which catapulted the band as one of the most popular bands in all of rock history, the tensions naturally grew as the musicians evolved and the hunger for fortune and fame had long been satiated. The period around the making of "The Wall" was also a point of contention amongst the band members. Two key ideas had emerged at the same time, one being a series of demos that was to evolve into what was at the time conceived as "Bricks In The Wall" while another related concept revolved around a scatter brained road trip about a man experiencing a midlife crisis and fantasizing about scoring with a hitchhiker along the way.

PROS AND CONS, as it was initially referred to, was in competition with the themes that would become "The Wall," with the band members finally coming to the conclusion that the theme "Bricks In The Wall" suited the band's next move musically speaking and thus ROGER WATERS, the main songwriter of both concepts put PROS AND CONS on hold for a future date. As "The Wall" came and went and became yet another smashing success, the tension had reached the breaking point and by the time that "The Final Cut" was gestating, the band had all but broken up in spirit except they didn't quite know it yet. Once again WATERS pressed to pick up the PROS AND CONS theme as the next Floyd album. It was rejected which probably contributed to his leaving the band a few short years later.

In his own time, while officially still part of Pink Floyd, at least in name only, ROGER WATERS finished his own musical vision that evolved into what would ultimately be titled THE PROS AND CONS OF HITCHHIKING. Never one to shy away from various topics ranging from exploitation, oppression, alienation, war and insanity, on his first solo album WATERS envisioned a man, not unlike himself, finding his world turned upside down as he struggles with the commitments of marriage and fidelity as he reaches the next chapter of his unsure life. The album is laid out in twelve dream sequences that shows this man facing his fears and paranoia and the album tackles a unique use of a stream of consciousness in a subconscious context. The release of THE PROS AND CONS OF HITCHHIIKING marked the first time since 1969's "Ummaguma" where the world could witness WATERS' unique style of Pink Floyd's majestic sound isolated from the creative marriage of the group as a whole (the other three members had already released solo albums by this point.)

Conceptually speaking, PROS AND CONS excels as it displays WATERS' strengths that catapulted the great Floyd to international superstardom as he was the primary composer of lyrics and conceptual grandiosity. The album displays all the recognizable guitar tricks, chord progressions and tones and timbres of "The Wall," which makes all the sense in the world as it was born in the same fertile wellspring which spawned it. Despite the brilliance in the lyrical and conceptual realms, PROS AND CONS suffers from been- there-done-that syndrome as it tends to emulate many of the key aspects of "The Wall," with spaced out guitar riffs, chilled out soloing and occasional melodic runs that immediately bring parts of "The Wall" to the forefront. In fact, the whole thing sounds like it may have been the unwanted "Bricks" in the very "Wall" that the other band members rejected.

One of the major downsides of having an album revolve around dream sequences is that it's, well, too dreamy. The majority of the album is set on simmer with slow dreamy heart-felt angst riddling every nook and cranny as acoustic guitars strum, electric solos soar in the sky and the occasional burst of the sax and trombone wail away in the background. Add to that the cliche backing vocal arrangement that is straight out of "The Wall" playbook and it becomes apparent why the other Pink Floyd rejected the idea of a "Wall 2." Ultimately the album gets bogged down into too much introspective conceptualism and doesn't deliver the goods in the rock department. It only redeems itself awards the end as the title track offers the best track on board with a rambunctious hooky groove that allows some rocking out with an interesting guitar accompaniment by Eric Clapton and a stellar saxophone solo by David Sanborn.

THE PROS AND CONS OF HITCHHIKING is by no means a throwaway album as it has its moments but there are ultimately too many references to "The Wall," and WATERS accomplishes little in separating his art from his lifelong band. In other words it shows him as a one trick pony who is incapable of exploring other musical arenas and is perpetually stuck on Pink Floyd mode. While that is forgivable as the album was after all created in the midst of the Pink Floyd era, the aspects i find harder to dismiss include the lack of variety amongst tracks and the downer vibe from the overly chilled out majority of the tracks. While no track per se is gawd awful, none other than the title track provide memorable melodic hooks either, an almost given for any Floyd album that emerged in the 70s, thus thrusting WATERS into the spotlight of being merely a part that makes up a more important sum. Elsewhere. This one is a fun spin once and a while but to call it essential would be giving it a little more relevance than it deserves.

 Amused to Death by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.93 | 490 ratings

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Amused to Death
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

3 stars As much as I want to like this album, and any Roger Waters' albums for that matter, I just can't seem to get into them. I have heard them all, but to me, the music always seems pretty much the same. I love Pink Floyd, and their better years definitely were when Waters was teamed with David Gilmour or Sid Barrett. It is also true that Waters was the creative force behind Pink Floyd, but Gilmour and/or Barrett were the heart and soul of the band. That is the conclusion I have come to.

Waters' concepts are excellent, and this album is no exception. There are some good parts here, especially with the "What God Wants" trilogy and "Late Home Tonight Pts 1 and 2", but for the most part, this sounds like a tired effort, just like his other solo albums. I know that Waters was the main force behind "The Wall" and even more so with "The Final Cut", and those Floyd albums were excellent even though it took me a while to warm up to "The Final Cut". But after that, everything Waters did sounded too much alike.

In this album, there is that signature Waters voice, attitude and sarcasm. But there is also that same sound that you heard on "The Final Cut". The concept is similar to previous concepts, this time an alien race discovers human beings all lying dead next to their TVs and they conclude we have been amused to death. The political and social messages are all there, which is fine, I can handle politics in music, but I need more variety. There are dynamics, which you expect from Waters also, but again, they are used the same exact way they were used before.

There are also a lot of guests on this album, everyone from Jeff Beck to Don Henley, from Rita Coolidge to Randy Jackson. But with all this, it still sounds like Roger Waters without the rest of Pink Floyd. I hate the fact that I don't like Waters' solo albums, because I really want to. But I would rather listen to the post Waters Floyd albums than this. Gilmour might not have the same amount of creativity, and usually that would be a big factor for me, but Gilmour has the passion that I don't find here. Yes it might be my opinion, but it's also my review. The overall sound is just too stale. I will give this 3 stars though for the concept more than anything. But by the time I reach the end of this album, I'm bored, because I've heard it before.

 The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans) by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 2015
3.63 | 45 ratings

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The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This movie has been available on Netflix for a while. It's part documentary, part live registration of The Wall (recorded between 2010-2013). The opening of the movie was exemplary for what was to come. Music by Roger Waters. Script by Waters. After an idea by Waters. Starring Roger Waters as Roger Waters. The cinematography of the documentary is great, but the idea is artistically corrupt. Old men chatting about, saying things that mean nothing, speaking as if it's a great revelation that comes with old age. In one scripted scene Waters sits at a dark lit bar in France with a French bartender who doesn't speak English. But he wants to tell the story of how his father died in the war anyway (in English). Roger Waters wants to tell his deep story no matter if it relevant/welcome or not.

This reflects back on the live footage of the complete The Wall record. The story has lost its relevance since WO II is more then halve a century ago. Schools have become child friendly. Drugs are known to be dangerous. People get help with their depressions. Communism and Fascism are dead. The Berlin Wall fell thirty years ago. Confusion has been replaced by a bitter understanding of reality or a flight to digital fantasy worlds. The original critique of his generation has actually changed society for the better - destroying its initial power. However, the Wall is still a work potent of a long list of classic symphonic rock songs. Yet Roger Waters has chosen to focus on an impressive show full of dated symbols. Yet again hiding the band behind a meaningless (personal) wall he has failed to tear down all his life. A plain crashing with special effects, brilliant visual material portrayed on the set and a stage full of dummy soldiers. The music sounds worn out, not even that well recorded, as if played by tired people. The average tempo of the songs is much slower then the original and extra instrumental passages add to the feeling of drag. If you would listen to a David Gilmour dvd next (choose any) you'd hear the Pink Floyd legacy played with way more fresh energy and atmosphere.

I could not recommend this film to any-one other than the hardcore fans of Roger Waters. Preferably people who have lived under a pile of bricks themselves for the past four decades.

 Is This the Life We Really Want? by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.74 | 217 ratings

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Is This the Life We Really Want?
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Roger Waters is still doing the things Roger Waters is known to do--and, I must admit, still doing them well. But, there is nothing here that is new, innovative, "progressive" (was there ever?), or refreshing. As a matter of fact, one might say that the stylings, sounds, and melodies present on this album sound extremely familiar. A few times I find myself even asking, "Hasn't he already done this before? (even on this very album?)" And yet I admire the fact that Roger still has creative juices flowing--that he feels he still has something to say (as well as a format in which to express his ideas). His voice is old, worn, but he can still surround himself with top notch performers, arrangers, conductors, and engineers. The strings arrangements are the highlights for me; the drums a little too intimate and "friendly" for my tastes.

Favorite songs: the Radiohead-sounding title song (despite its PF "WALL" familiarity); the Steely Danish "Smell The Roses," and; "the Stones-y Tom Waits-y "Wait For Her."

I'm not such a Waters fan as to know all of his post-Pink Floyd albums really well, but does he try to replicate The Wall with its radio/television audio samples bridging all his songs with all of his albums?

three stars; a good album; not very proggy, though, innit?

 Is This the Life We Really Want? by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.74 | 217 ratings

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Is This the Life We Really Want?
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by lazland
Prog Reviewer

4 stars When the first original Roger Waters rock album in 25 years was released this year, I was contacted by two colleagues working in the same government department as me.

The first is a big jazz and rock fan, but also a person with principled (left wing) political views. He absolutely raved about the album, saying it was the best thing he had heard for years.

The other is a big prog rock fan with absolutely no political views whatsoever, saving that all politicians are a bunch of shysters best ignored. He hates this album, which he denounces as basically Waters ranting about the same "bloody things he's ranted about for 40 years, now".

Well, that is a measure of just how Waters splits opinion, and, in a way, both of my colleagues are right. If you appreciate a bit of Trump bashing, raging against the inequities of the world and how, if you were God, you would change it all, then this is the album for you. If you don't appreciate such things, and the somewhat hectoring tomes of Waters get on your pips, and detract from the music, it is probably best to steer clear.

Most of us, though, sit somewhere in the middle, and, certainly, long-term Floyd fans must by now be used to Waters' lyrical style. Much of Animals, now 40 years old, influenced (and continues to do so) my personal political views, and, to be fair, old Rog is correct ? the world is in a wee bit of a state.

Musically, much of this album is very reminiscent of Floyd in a way previous works were not. Picture That, for example, sounds as if it has been lifted directly from studio outtakes of Animals, and tarted up technologically. Indeed, the keyboards are an eerie echo of Richard Wright.

The entire work sounds utterly lush, and credit is due to Nigel Godrich, the knobs man. He has produced a wonderful soundscape canvas for Waters to play and speak upon, and it is here that I feel is the most crucial point about the album. Waters is Waters, and his politics are his politics, but the man is responsible for some of the most important rock music of the 20th century, and whilst this album certainly does not touch those heights, it still ain't half bad for someone the wrong side of 70 years old.

I will rate this album as excellent, four stars. I will not dip into it as often as I still do with Amused to Death, but, as swansongs go, this will do rather nicely.

 Is This the Life We Really Want? by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.74 | 217 ratings

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Is This the Life We Really Want?
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by FunkyM

4 stars Roger Waters is back with his first new solo studio album in about 25 years, Is This The Life We Really Want?

On this album, Waters incorporates the sound of classic Floyd albums such as Wish You Were Here and Animals into that of his later solo work. In my opinion, the result is probably the best Roger Waters solo album to date. Is This the Life We Really Want? sounds like the album that Waters' last Floyd record, should have been.

The album is a song cycle, typical of previous Waters works. Thematically, Waters takes aim at political and social issues (no surprises there) and it seems that in the current political climate he has found renewed vigour.

In the very Floydian sounding 'Picture That' we hear Waters trumpet the line, 'Picture a leader with no f***ing brains' and it wasn't too surprising to see that the CD booklet displays an image of the current U.S. president on the lyrics page.

Then, there is the title track which begins with a Trump sound bite shortly before we hear Waters sing, 'every time a nincompoop becomes the president'.

Waters is singing about more than just about Trump though. He addresses many of the themes he has written and sung about for the past 40 years. After a short spoken introduction, the album opens with the ballad "D'j' Vu" which begins with a simple acoustic guitar but soon opens up to orchestration. Waters sings about what he would do if he were God before symbolically shifting his perspective to that of a military drone. We then segue seamlessly into the beautiful 'The Last Refugee', which seems to be referring to the Syrian refugee crisis.

One of my favourite tracks is 'Bird in a Gale', a dark track which references the death of Alan Kurdi (the three-year-old Syrian refugee who drowned in the Mediterranean Sea while trying to escape the civil war).

There's also 'Smell the Roses', which musically sounds a bit like 'Have a Cigar' part two. This was the lead single from the album and it's easy to see why. It's perhaps the most 'classic Pink Floyd'-sounding song on the album.

The album ends with three songs that work a bit like a 10-minute suite, 'Wait for Her', 'Oceans Apart', and 'Part of Me Died'. They tell the story of a man waiting for a refugee woman and when he meets her, a part of him (metaphorically, one assumes) dies.

Overall, I think Is This the Life We Really Want? is the Roger Waters comeback we've all been waiting for. Waters recalls his past without getting lost in it and his sardonic wit is as sharp as ever. If you are a Pink Floyd fan, I would consider this album a must-listen.

Higlights: "D'j' Vu", "The Last Refugee", "Picture That", "Is This the Life We Really Want?", "Bird in a Gale", "Smell the Roses", "Part of Me Died"

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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