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ROGER WATERS

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Roger Waters biography
George Roger Waters - Born 6 September 1943 (Great Bookham, Cambridge, UK)

Roger WATERS' musical career took off when he joined the band PINK FLOYD in 1965 along with highschool friend Syd BARRETT. After BARRETT's drug problems got him kicked out of the band, WATERS became the primary creative force, and thanks to such inspirations as his father who died in World War 2 before they could ever meet, his strongly left wing political views, and his ex-bandmate BARRETT, he went on to compose such masterwork concept albums as "Dark Side of the Moon", "Wish You Were Here", "Animals" and "The Wall" during his time with the band. However, by 1983 when the band completed "The Final Cut", he had taken total control, and guitarist David GILMOUR wasn't going to take it. The two began to fight feverishly, eventually resulting in WATERS quitting the band thinking they could never go on without him. They did however, leaving him to his own solo career. Roger's solo music bares striking resemblance to the final few albums he did with PINK FLOYD, in that it is very dark and driven by a concept. Any fans of "The Wall" or "The Final Cut" would do well to give his solo work a listen.

Roger's solo career actually dates back to 1970 when he worked with avant-garde composer Ron Geesin on the soundtrack to the film "The Body". His first real solo album came in 1985 with the brilliant "Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking" though. This is an essencial album for fans of his later work with PINK FLOYD, although some may find it a bit boring and overly personal (it's based on a dream he had, and touches on almost all of his typical themes in his lyrics). In 1987 he contributed music to the film "When the Wind Blows", and also created another concept album in "Radio K.A.O.S.". This is the least essencial of his solo albums, and is really plagued by the horrible 80s sound that was dominating music at the time. That said, it still has some bright spots, and is by no means a weak album. His next solo work didn't come until 1992's "Amused To Death". Many consider this his best, and it is without question his most political album ever. None of these are particularlily accessible, so it couldn't hurt to just go from the beginning and start with "The Pros and Cons of Hitch Hiking" if interested in his work, though you can't go wrong with "Amused To Death" either (that is, if yo...
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ROGER WATERS discography


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ROGER WATERS top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.84 | 131 ratings
Roger Waters & Ron Geesin: Music From The Body (OST)
1970
3.06 | 362 ratings
The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking
1984
2.98 | 279 ratings
Radio K.A.O.S.
1987
3.93 | 504 ratings
Amused to Death
1992
3.34 | 117 ratings
Ça Ira
2005
3.73 | 229 ratings
Is This the Life We Really Want?
2017
3.20 | 5 ratings
Igor Stravinsky's The Soldier's Tale
2018

ROGER WATERS Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.36 | 121 ratings
The Wall - Live in Berlin
1990
3.61 | 169 ratings
In the Flesh - Live
2000
3.66 | 41 ratings
The Wall (The Soundtrack From A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
2015

ROGER WATERS Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.20 | 75 ratings
The Wall Live in Berlin
1990
2.69 | 16 ratings
What God Wants, Part I (VHS)
1992
4.30 | 156 ratings
In the Flesh (DVD)
2001
3.61 | 46 ratings
The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
2015
4.06 | 12 ratings
Us + Them
2020

ROGER WATERS Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.61 | 57 ratings
Flickering Flame - The Solo Years 1
2002
3.38 | 17 ratings
The Roger Waters Collection (7CD + DVD)
2011

ROGER WATERS Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

2.50 | 4 ratings
Every Strangers Eyes
1984
2.00 | 4 ratings
The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking
1984
3.50 | 8 ratings
The Tide Is Turning (After Live Aid)
1987
2.50 | 4 ratings
Who Needs Information
1987
2.25 | 4 ratings
Sunset Strip
1987
2.19 | 21 ratings
Radio Waves (EP)
1987
2.15 | 8 ratings
The Wall - Berlin '90 - Commemorative EP
1990
3.92 | 12 ratings
What God Wants, Part I
1992
3.79 | 14 ratings
The Bravery Of Being Out Of Range
1992
4.00 | 11 ratings
Three Wishes
1992
3.22 | 39 ratings
To Kill the Child / Leaving Beirut
2004
3.38 | 8 ratings
Hello (I Love You)
2007
1.33 | 3 ratings
We Shall Overcome
2010
3.74 | 19 ratings
Smell the Roses
2017

ROGER WATERS Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Wall Live in Berlin by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 1990
3.20 | 75 ratings

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The Wall Live in Berlin
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nş 458

As I wrote before, when I reviewed the CD version, I have the two versions of this live show, the CD and the DVD versions. So, I'm going to make two reviews of this live show. However, as they cross itself one with another and are completely linked, I'm going to make both reviews as one being a complement of the other. So, in the CD version I wrote more about the music and the protagonists of this live show, saving for this DVD a place about the concept and the local of it. So, if you are interested in know all my point of view about this concert, you must read my both reviews.

As we know, the concept of "The Wall" belongs to Roger Waters. The story portrays fictionalized the life of an anti- hero (Pink) that is mistreated by the society since the early days of his life, suffocated by his mother, oppressed at school, he builds a wall in his consciousness to isolate him from society, and takes refuge in a fantasy world created for him. During a hallucination caused by drugs, Pink becomes a fascist dictator only to have his conscience rebel put it in court, where his inner judge ordering him to have his own wall down and open to the outside world. In the history of the album "The Wall" there is an imaginary wall that gradually isolates the protagonist of the real life, which removes his friends and family. The fall of this wall isn't only the end of the division, but the end of a fear, a fear of revealing himself.

As we know, "The Wall" was a personal Roger Waters' bet, and is a rock opera that centres on the character of Pink, who is largely based on Roger Waters' life. As the character of the story Pink, Roger Waters also lost his father during the Second World War. On the original album, all songs were written and composed by Roger Waters, except "Young Lust", "Comfortably Numb" and "Run Like Hell" written and composed by David Gilmour and Roger Waters and "The Trial" written and composed by Bob Ezrin and Roger Waters. So, "The Wall" is, in a certain way, a kind of his little baby.

It was normal that Waters became interested of making a great world live show in Berlin with "The Wall". The concert was staged on a vacant terrain placed between the Potsdamer Platz and the Brandenburg Gate, a location with a very strong meaning. It was part of the former "no man's land" of the Berlin Wall. Potsdamer Platz is sat between the two Berlin Walls which divided the city, and where for decades people had died trying to escape, from east to west, trying to join their families in the other side of the wall. The show had a sell-out crowd of over 350.000 people, and right before the performance started the gates were opened which enabled at least another 100.000 people to watch the live show.

The colours and the vivid stage design are there for all to see, and the direction is in keeping with the theatrical feel of this concert. Although this image struggles with overall clarity, it doesn't detract from the experience, and colours are rich and vibrant, if a little "noisy" in places. You really can't expect much more than that, given the poor master material and the age of the production. The sound quality is extremely good. The recording gives that the live feel right from the start, with clever use of the surround channels as the band are introduced to screams of approval from the thousands present. The overall sound mix is extremely well handled, never drawing your attention away from the screen, but opens up a huge sound field across the front channels, with clever placement of the instruments. This is an excellent remix, and the overall effect is stunning when you add in the visuals. A down mixed Dolby Stereo track is also available. A 30 minute Documentary kicks of the extra features on the disc. This starts with a quick history lesson on the Berlin Wall, and sets up the story of how the idea and concepts came together for the concert. The entire production crew give a retrospective glance back through interviews, of why they put together the concert, and the problems they had to face. All together this rounds the themes of the disc, and the concert, into a must have package for all Pink Floyd fans.

Conclusion: Besides all I wrote before on my CD review, I must say something more, this time about the live show itself. I was truly amazed when I saw this concert, for the first time in direct in the TV of my country, in those days. I was completely astonished with the show, particularly in terms of stage design and concept. The stage was absolutely gigantic with over 500.000 people watching the concert. About the performance of the guest artists I'm not so critical about it, like many of my colleagues on this site. Some of those performances weren't so bad, really. For instance, Joni Mitchell doing "Goodbye Blue Sky", Sinead O'Connor doing "Mother", Ute Lemper doing "The Thin Ice" and Paul Carrack doing "Hey You", are actually quite good. But above all, I liked very much the performance of Roger Waters. It does also have some great musical moments like Brian Adams doing "What Shall We Do Now?" and "Young Lust", and when Snowy White and Rick DiFonzo doing their guitar duel on the top of the wall. All in all, it's highly recommended.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Wall - Live in Berlin by WATERS, ROGER album cover Live, 1990
2.36 | 121 ratings

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The Wall - Live in Berlin
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nş 457

"The Wall - Live In Berlin" is the debut live album of Roger Waters as a solo artist. It was recorded by Roger Waters and was taken from a live show made with numerous guest artists. As its name indicates, it was based on the eleventh Pink Floyd studio album "The Wall", released in 1979. As we know, "The Wall" was an album largely written by Roger Waters during his years as a Pink Floyd member. The live show was held in Berlin on 21 July 1990, to commemorate a very important historical world event, the fall of the Berlin Wall occurred eight months before. A live album of this concert was released in September 1990, and a video of the concert was also commercially released precisely in the same year.

Personally, I have the two versions of this live show, the CD and the DVD versions. So, I'm going to make two reviews of this live show. However, as they cross itself one with another and are completely linked, I'm going to make both reviews as one being a complement of the other. So, in this review I'm going to write more about the music and the protagonists of this show, saving for the DVD the place and the concept of it. So, if you want you can read both reviews.

Initially, Roger Waters tried to get great and very well known guest musicians like Peter Gabriel, Bruce Springsteen and Eric Clapton but or they were either unavailable or turned it down. By the other hand, if both, Rod Stewart who was to sing "Young Lust" and Joe Cocker were originally confirmed to appear, when the original planned concert date was modified, the new date found both them unavailable too. On the other side, it seems that Roger Waters also stated that David Gilmour could play guitar on the show. However, either because Roger Waters never have invited David Gilmour, or he declined that invitation, soon it became clear that David Gilmour wasn't going to participate on the concert too.

So, in the end, Roger Waters had to bring some other guest artists, the artists that were available, including Rick Danko, Levon Helm and Garth Hudson of The Band, The Hooters, Van Morrison, Sinead O'Connor, Cindy Lauper, Marianne Faithfull, Scorpions, Joni Mitchell, Paul Carrack, Thomas Dolby and Bryan Adams, along with the actors Albert Finney, Jerry Hall, Tim Curry and Ute Lemper. Leonard Cheshire opened the live concert by blowing a World War II whistle.

Besides them, Roger Waters had the following band, The Bleeding Heart Band: Joe Chemay, Jim Farber, Jim Haas and John Joyce (backing vocals), Rick DiFonzo and Snowy White (lead guitars), Andy Fairweather Low (guitar and bass), Nick Glenny Smith (keyboards), Peter Wood (keyboards) and Graham Broad (drums). The concert also featured The East Berlin Radio Orchestra, The East Berlin Radio Choir and The Military Orchestra of the Soviet Army.

The music here is very faithful to the original Pink Floyd's album. It's true that here we don't have the real Pink Floyd band, but the various artists on this live show performed the songs along with Roger Waters each lending their own touch of understanding to his lyrics. The sound is incredible good with the added choir and the orchestra unfolding the rock written songs into the beautiful melodies that I and my friends could hear so many years ago. As we listened to the album, obviously a conceptual piece and it was shown here in all its beauty but still having that edge. The final result is a very powerful live album and where the sound editing is very good and beautiful. This is truly a classic piece, really.

Great was also the performance of the many musicians on stage. The two guitarists of The Bleeding Heart Band held up well the solos throughout the concert, even if both of them could not certainly compete with David Gilmour, just like the keyboardist and the drummer could not compete with Richard Wright and Nick Mason, still, they all managed to do a very decent work without trying to copy the peculiar style of the Pink Floyd members. In general, all guest artists are competent too. The Rundfunk Orchestra and choir helped creating a very solid accompaniment from the beginning to the end, especially throughout the most delicate passages. The Marching band of the Combined Soviet Forces in Germany lent a hand as well and made the musical atmosphere of the concert to be particularly powerful and glorious.

Conclusion: "The Wall" is a great album and it's also, in my humble opinion, one of the best conceptual albums ever made. It's also one of the most known progressive rock albums in the world, helping Pink Floyd to be the most known progressive rock band in the world. It's true that "The Wall - Live In Berlin" is far from to be a perfect album, especially due to the choice of several guest artists, which wasn't perhaps the best. But, we must understand this isn't properly a normal live album from a band. We have to consider this album celebrates a very important and significant moment in the history of those days. The criticism "The Wall - Live In Berlin" isn't a true team effort is, for me, irrelevant. Besides, we know that "The Wall" represents very much to Roger Waters and that "The Wall" was almost a personal bet of him and represents, in a certain way, his little baby. Concluding, and despite some weak points, "The Wall - Live In Berlin" remains, for me, an excellent live album with some great musical moments. So, I really can recommend it to all people.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Us + Them by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 2020
4.06 | 12 ratings

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Us + Them
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by rdtprog
Special Collaborator Heavy / RPI / Symphonic Prog Team

4 stars This show has been released in cinema a long time ago and it took many months to hit the record store on physical media. The disk case is not bigger than a post-card. After the release of ''The Wall Live'' concert we knew that the production would be similar with giants screens in the back and even in the middle of the venue. The setlist covers mostly ''Dark Side of the Moon'' which has been played a lot by many tribute bands in the last 20 years, but this time Roger added some songs from ''Animals'' which is a welcome addition. Also, he played 3 songs from his latest solo album, but I guess that most people were there for the Pink Floyd songs. The sound clarity and the picture are excellent, but I didn't enjoy how they use the light show with mostly red and white spots. There is a good use of the sound of explosions for special effects with projections on the screens.

Roger Waters signing and playing is still lively and we can see him signing outside his microphone. The signing from other musicians is struggling at times. But when the music is so good, you can tolerate some flaws in the vocal department. Roger Waters didn't speak between songs and kept his political message for the love of humanity at the end. This concert was recorded in surround which adds some value to the overall experience.

 The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans) by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 2015
3.61 | 46 ratings

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The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by iluvmarillion

3 stars The Pink Floyd rock opera, The Wall, whose themes of abandonment and isolation are explored through a character called Pink, are appropriated by Roger Waters through a personal journal to follow the last traces of his father, who died in the Second World War in battle for Cassino in Italy. Unsurprisingly the two align since Waters wrote the original lyrics to The Wall. The character Pink, a Rockstar whose star is fading, is alienated from his fans, so goes into a form of self-imposed exile where he substance abuses. He eventually comes out the other side after he abandons his self- isolation. The symbol of this self-isolation is a wall that society erects to protect it's own citizens, but is overtly used to seal itself from the truths of it's own folly. The collapse of Communism in the East Europe in the eighties, associated by the fall of the Berlin Wall, bore the venue for Roger's celebrated 1990 concert which raised money for the Memorial Relief fund charity.

Roger Waters seeks to address his abandonment by his father by journeying to Cassino to pay his respect at his father's grave site. The picturesque site of the hills of Cassino are a perfect place to build the memorial and it is very moving to watch the solitary figure of Roger take a trumpet out of his car and play tribute to his father.

The documentary is cleverly interspersed with the concert performance of The Wall in such a way as to not disturb the flow of the concert. Roger Waters is a master at using silences to highlight the musical nuances within a song. Despite that I would have preferred the documentary to be played before or after the concert, not during it.

A superb cast of musicians have been assembled to play the concert. You couldn't get better guitarists than Dave Kilminster and Snowy White. Multi-instrumentalist Jon Carin shares keyboard duties with Roger's son, Harry Waters. And Graham Broad on drums and percussion has been featuring with Roger Waters since the nineteen eighties. Roger Waters does most of the singing and hasn't lost his touch on voice. He has a chorus of singers including a boys' choir to support him.

The concert itself is a visual feast of lasers and lights, very theatrical, with screen projections of attacking aeroplanes and huge life size floating blimps. Marching Nazi like troops join the stage with Roger firing a toy machine gun over the heads of the audience. As the band plays, a gigantic cardboard brick wall is built around and over the heads of the performers until it reaches a point where most of the musicians are concealed behind the wall. Then after performing the finale song, The Trial, Roger screams at the audience to tear down the wall and the whole thing comes down.

How does this concert performance compare with Pink Floyd's studio album of The Wall? Basically, I think the two support each other. Neither is perfect. This one is longer. Many of the songs are stretched. Others are shortened. The last side of the Pink Floyd album drags a bit after the song Run Like Hell. In Roger's version the wailing sirens of Run Like Hell gives the song more expression and leads to a more fulfilling conclusion when the wall comes down. The first part of Roger's version is impressive as well. From In The Flesh to Mother, through the middle chorus of Another Brick In The Wall, it moves more freely. Where it can't compete is side 3 of the Floyd album from the opening Hey You to Comfortably Numb. While Dave Kilminster performs a great guitar solo on Comfortably Numb there is nobody who can play this solo as well as Dave Gilmour.

 Amused to Death by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.93 | 504 ratings

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Amused to Death
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by mariorockprog

4 stars 3.75: After hearing the surprisingly really good is this the life we really want, and seeing the high scores it has, i wanted to give it other try to this one (I was avoiding it) only to discover is the same thing he was doing in his previous last albums but in his best version. very pretentious and political, and with antiwar lyrics. Musically I only liked God wants part 1, Bravery of being out of range , watching tv , three wishes and amused to death.Sounds like animals and the wall combined. Really great work in the guitars for some of the songs. I didnt like most of the lyrics, but the second part of the album, has some deep thoughts and interesting things to say. Supposedly the concept is about aliens arriving to the earth and seeing monkeys watching tv amused for the death that is happening. I was surprised with his deteriorated voice even in 1990. The classic style of criticizing anything and trying to convince of thinking in his way as always is presence, classic girls singing at the background. One of the things that i dont like of Waters music is that is so repetitive, makes a good tunes and want to divide it a lot of parts with only different lyrics, the same exact music is recycled, nothing spectacular, and turns to be most repetitive. Jeff beck is the most known participant of the thousand collaborator. Finally, is a good album, it has really good moments but also there are a few mediocre songs, an excellent addition, however I will recommended it most to the people that liked his work.
 Is This the Life We Really Want? by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.73 | 229 ratings

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Is This the Life We Really Want?
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by mariorockprog

4 stars 4: the last album by Roger Waters until now in 2019, and I think is really his last album because he already said the most probably isn't going to do any other tour. I have to recognize that I am not a big fan of Waters, I think most of the pink floyd fans don't like when he began to turn political and in his previous work he was very repetitive, also I consider him very arrogant person and even he was a genius in Pink Floyd with his creativity in lyrics and concepts and the way he sung, he always needed of the band to make good music, proof of that is all his other records. Thankfully, in this record he amended himself, doing the album most Pink Floyd seemingly of any solo career (I am missing to hear Wrights work). Finally, his lyrics and ideas get combined with really good music. If I have to describe in terms of PF albums, It sounds reminiscent to Dark side of the Moon and the Wall. His voice is not in his best moment, but it is a good effort. The songs that I really enjoyed were: Smell the Roses, Picture that, Bird in a Gale and Part of me died. The other ones are good too but nothing especial. Finally, a really good album, the most similar to the Floyd era, despite its little faults, and excellent addition to any prog collection.
 The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 1984
3.06 | 362 ratings

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The Pros And Cons Of Hitch Hiking
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

3 stars The ever fascinating drama that was Pink Floyd faced a new chapter around the time that "The Wall" was created. After amassing unthinkable success during the 70s with one classic album and world tour after another which catapulted the band as one of the most popular bands in all of rock history, the tensions naturally grew as the musicians evolved and the hunger for fortune and fame had long been satiated. The period around the making of "The Wall" was also a point of contention amongst the band members. Two key ideas had emerged at the same time, one being a series of demos that was to evolve into what was at the time conceived as "Bricks In The Wall" while another related concept revolved around a scatter brained road trip about a man experiencing a midlife crisis and fantasizing about scoring with a hitchhiker along the way.

PROS AND CONS, as it was initially referred to, was in competition with the themes that would become "The Wall," with the band members finally coming to the conclusion that the theme "Bricks In The Wall" suited the band's next move musically speaking and thus ROGER WATERS, the main songwriter of both concepts put PROS AND CONS on hold for a future date. As "The Wall" came and went and became yet another smashing success, the tension had reached the breaking point and by the time that "The Final Cut" was gestating, the band had all but broken up in spirit except they didn't quite know it yet. Once again WATERS pressed to pick up the PROS AND CONS theme as the next Floyd album. It was rejected which probably contributed to his leaving the band a few short years later.

In his own time, while officially still part of Pink Floyd, at least in name only, ROGER WATERS finished his own musical vision that evolved into what would ultimately be titled THE PROS AND CONS OF HITCHHIKING. Never one to shy away from various topics ranging from exploitation, oppression, alienation, war and insanity, on his first solo album WATERS envisioned a man, not unlike himself, finding his world turned upside down as he struggles with the commitments of marriage and fidelity as he reaches the next chapter of his unsure life. The album is laid out in twelve dream sequences that shows this man facing his fears and paranoia and the album tackles a unique use of a stream of consciousness in a subconscious context. The release of THE PROS AND CONS OF HITCHHIIKING marked the first time since 1969's "Ummaguma" where the world could witness WATERS' unique style of Pink Floyd's majestic sound isolated from the creative marriage of the group as a whole (the other three members had already released solo albums by this point.)

Conceptually speaking, PROS AND CONS excels as it displays WATERS' strengths that catapulted the great Floyd to international superstardom as he was the primary composer of lyrics and conceptual grandiosity. The album displays all the recognizable guitar tricks, chord progressions and tones and timbres of "The Wall," which makes all the sense in the world as it was born in the same fertile wellspring which spawned it. Despite the brilliance in the lyrical and conceptual realms, PROS AND CONS suffers from been- there-done-that syndrome as it tends to emulate many of the key aspects of "The Wall," with spaced out guitar riffs, chilled out soloing and occasional melodic runs that immediately bring parts of "The Wall" to the forefront. In fact, the whole thing sounds like it may have been the unwanted "Bricks" in the very "Wall" that the other band members rejected.

One of the major downsides of having an album revolve around dream sequences is that it's, well, too dreamy. The majority of the album is set on simmer with slow dreamy heart-felt angst riddling every nook and cranny as acoustic guitars strum, electric solos soar in the sky and the occasional burst of the sax and trombone wail away in the background. Add to that the cliche backing vocal arrangement that is straight out of "The Wall" playbook and it becomes apparent why the other Pink Floyd rejected the idea of a "Wall 2." Ultimately the album gets bogged down into too much introspective conceptualism and doesn't deliver the goods in the rock department. It only redeems itself awards the end as the title track offers the best track on board with a rambunctious hooky groove that allows some rocking out with an interesting guitar accompaniment by Eric Clapton and a stellar saxophone solo by David Sanborn.

THE PROS AND CONS OF HITCHHIKING is by no means a throwaway album as it has its moments but there are ultimately too many references to "The Wall," and WATERS accomplishes little in separating his art from his lifelong band. In other words it shows him as a one trick pony who is incapable of exploring other musical arenas and is perpetually stuck on Pink Floyd mode. While that is forgivable as the album was after all created in the midst of the Pink Floyd era, the aspects i find harder to dismiss include the lack of variety amongst tracks and the downer vibe from the overly chilled out majority of the tracks. While no track per se is gawd awful, none other than the title track provide memorable melodic hooks either, an almost given for any Floyd album that emerged in the 70s, thus thrusting WATERS into the spotlight of being merely a part that makes up a more important sum. Elsewhere. This one is a fun spin once and a while but to call it essential would be giving it a little more relevance than it deserves.

 Amused to Death by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 1992
3.93 | 504 ratings

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Amused to Death
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

3 stars As much as I want to like this album, and any Roger Waters' albums for that matter, I just can't seem to get into them. I have heard them all, but to me, the music always seems pretty much the same. I love Pink Floyd, and their better years definitely were when Waters was teamed with David Gilmour or Sid Barrett. It is also true that Waters was the creative force behind Pink Floyd, but Gilmour and/or Barrett were the heart and soul of the band. That is the conclusion I have come to.

Waters' concepts are excellent, and this album is no exception. There are some good parts here, especially with the "What God Wants" trilogy and "Late Home Tonight Pts 1 and 2", but for the most part, this sounds like a tired effort, just like his other solo albums. I know that Waters was the main force behind "The Wall" and even more so with "The Final Cut", and those Floyd albums were excellent even though it took me a while to warm up to "The Final Cut". But after that, everything Waters did sounded too much alike.

In this album, there is that signature Waters voice, attitude and sarcasm. But there is also that same sound that you heard on "The Final Cut". The concept is similar to previous concepts, this time an alien race discovers human beings all lying dead next to their TVs and they conclude we have been amused to death. The political and social messages are all there, which is fine, I can handle politics in music, but I need more variety. There are dynamics, which you expect from Waters also, but again, they are used the same exact way they were used before.

There are also a lot of guests on this album, everyone from Jeff Beck to Don Henley, from Rita Coolidge to Randy Jackson. But with all this, it still sounds like Roger Waters without the rest of Pink Floyd. I hate the fact that I don't like Waters' solo albums, because I really want to. But I would rather listen to the post Waters Floyd albums than this. Gilmour might not have the same amount of creativity, and usually that would be a big factor for me, but Gilmour has the passion that I don't find here. Yes it might be my opinion, but it's also my review. The overall sound is just too stale. I will give this 3 stars though for the concept more than anything. But by the time I reach the end of this album, I'm bored, because I've heard it before.

 The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans) by WATERS, ROGER album cover DVD/Video, 2015
3.61 | 46 ratings

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The Wall (A Film by Roger Waters and Sean Evans)
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

2 stars This movie has been available on Netflix for a while. It's part documentary, part live registration of The Wall (recorded between 2010-2013). The opening of the movie was exemplary for what was to come. Music by Roger Waters. Script by Waters. After an idea by Waters. Starring Roger Waters as Roger Waters. The cinematography of the documentary is great, but the idea is artistically corrupt. Old men chatting about, saying things that mean nothing, speaking as if it's a great revelation that comes with old age. In one scripted scene Waters sits at a dark lit bar in France with a French bartender who doesn't speak English. But he wants to tell the story of how his father died in the war anyway (in English). Roger Waters wants to tell his deep story no matter if it relevant/welcome or not.

This reflects back on the live footage of the complete The Wall record. The story has lost its relevance since WO II is more then halve a century ago. Schools have become child friendly. Drugs are known to be dangerous. People get help with their depressions. Communism and Fascism are dead. The Berlin Wall fell thirty years ago. Confusion has been replaced by a bitter understanding of reality or a flight to digital fantasy worlds. The original critique of his generation has actually changed society for the better - destroying its initial power. However, the Wall is still a work potent of a long list of classic symphonic rock songs. Yet Roger Waters has chosen to focus on an impressive show full of dated symbols. Yet again hiding the band behind a meaningless (personal) wall he has failed to tear down all his life. A plain crashing with special effects, brilliant visual material portrayed on the set and a stage full of dummy soldiers. The music sounds worn out, not even that well recorded, as if played by tired people. The average tempo of the songs is much slower then the original and extra instrumental passages add to the feeling of drag. If you would listen to a David Gilmour dvd next (choose any) you'd hear the Pink Floyd legacy played with way more fresh energy and atmosphere.

I could not recommend this film to any-one other than the hardcore fans of Roger Waters. Preferably people who have lived under a pile of bricks themselves for the past four decades.

 Is This the Life We Really Want? by WATERS, ROGER album cover Studio Album, 2017
3.73 | 229 ratings

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Is This the Life We Really Want?
Roger Waters Crossover Prog

Review by BrufordFreak
Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

3 stars Roger Waters is still doing the things Roger Waters is known to do--and, I must admit, still doing them well. But, there is nothing here that is new, innovative, "progressive" (was there ever?), or refreshing. As a matter of fact, one might say that the stylings, sounds, and melodies present on this album sound extremely familiar. A few times I find myself even asking, "Hasn't he already done this before? (even on this very album?)" And yet I admire the fact that Roger still has creative juices flowing--that he feels he still has something to say (as well as a format in which to express his ideas). His voice is old, worn, but he can still surround himself with top notch performers, arrangers, conductors, and engineers. The strings arrangements are the highlights for me; the drums a little too intimate and "friendly" for my tastes.

Favorite songs: the Radiohead-sounding title song (despite its PF "WALL" familiarity); the Steely Danish "Smell The Roses," and; "the Stones-y Tom Waits-y "Wait For Her."

I'm not such a Waters fan as to know all of his post-Pink Floyd albums really well, but does he try to replicate The Wall with its radio/television audio samples bridging all his songs with all of his albums?

three stars; a good album; not very proggy, though, innit?

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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