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PINK FLOYD

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


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Pink Floyd picture
Pink Floyd biography
Formed in 1965 in London, UK - Disbanded in 1994 - Reunited with different formation on several ocasions

One of the biggest bands of all time

Of all the bands who come under the progressive rock banner, Pink Floyd are, arguably, the act most recognisable in the wider music community to music lovers of all genres. Yet, as revealed famously by Nick Mason in an old interview, even at the height of their fame, they could walk down any street, and passers-by would not have recognised a member of one of the most commercially successful acts in music history.

The band were formed in London in 1965, the original members being Roger (known as Syd) BARRETT on vocals and lead guitar, Nick MASON on drums, Roger WATERS on bass guitar and vocals, and Rick WRIGHT on keyboards.

The London of the late 1960's was a melting pot of live acts and varying musical genres, and the band gained a cult following amongst the underground psychedelic crowd of the time. This expanded into a more public consciousness with a residency at the famous UFO Club, with a hypnotic light show and pulsating, often indescribable, sounds. This led to television appearances, most famously an interview and live performance on BBC The Look of the Week, with a rather bemused classical performer Hans Keller in tow. Waters was famously asked just why everything had to be so loud?!

This popularity led to the band signing to EMI, who in 1967 released two hit singles, Arnold Layne, which attracted controversy regarding its cross-dressing themes, and See Emily Play. They charted in the UK at 20 and 6 respectively.

The debut album which followed, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, is universally recognised as being hugely influential in rock music, beyond the narrow confines of psychedelia. It peaked at number 6 in the UK album charts in 1967, and the band continued to play not only their residency, but also increasing numbers of national gigs and festivals.

The strain, however, was beginning to tell on Barrett, and a fragile mental state, exacerbated by LSD, led to him becoming almost semi-detached from the band and wider reality. The situation became such that the band, at the end of 1967, drafted in David GILMOUR ...
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PINK FLOYD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

PINK FLOYD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 2149 ratings
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
1967
3.67 | 1887 ratings
A Saucerful of Secrets
1968
3.14 | 1451 ratings
More (OST)
1969
3.47 | 1827 ratings
Ummagumma
1969
3.89 | 2366 ratings
Atom Heart Mother
1970
4.30 | 3336 ratings
Meddle
1971
3.37 | 1674 ratings
Obscured by Clouds
1972
4.61 | 4554 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon
1973
4.64 | 4365 ratings
Wish You Were Here
1975
4.53 | 3921 ratings
Animals
1977
4.10 | 3158 ratings
The Wall
1979
3.19 | 1952 ratings
The Final Cut
1983
3.07 | 1822 ratings
A Momentary Lapse of Reason
1987
3.75 | 2149 ratings
The Division Bell
1994
3.30 | 907 ratings
The Endless River
2014

PINK FLOYD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.41 | 600 ratings
Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1988
3.96 | 817 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
4.11 | 513 ratings
Is There Anybody Out There?
2000
3.91 | 34 ratings
Live at Knebworth 1990
2021

PINK FLOYD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.76 | 551 ratings
Live at Pompeii
1981
4.12 | 588 ratings
The Wall (The Movie)
1982
3.69 | 192 ratings
In Concert - Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1989
3.00 | 63 ratings
La Carrera Panamericana
1992
4.45 | 559 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
3.13 | 97 ratings
London - Live 66-67
1999
4.59 | 669 ratings
Live at Pompeii (The Director's Cut)
2003
4.08 | 189 ratings
Classic Albums: The Dark Side Of The Moon
2003
2.92 | 59 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd
2003
3.30 | 70 ratings
The Pink Floyd & Syd Barrett Story
2003
2.40 | 33 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd Volume 2 - A Critical Review 1975 - 1996
2005
2.22 | 18 ratings
The Ultimate Review
2005
1.97 | 21 ratings
The World's Greatest Albums - Atom Heart Mother
2005
2.48 | 22 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here
2005
1.93 | 21 ratings
Reflections And Echoes
2006
2.75 | 23 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's The Piper At The Gates of Dawn
2006
1.42 | 24 ratings
Rock Milestones: Ummagumma
2006
2.06 | 15 ratings
Music Box Biographical Collection
2006
2.28 | 20 ratings
The Dark Side - Interviews
2006
2.23 | 17 ratings
Total Rock Review
2006
2.48 | 20 ratings
Meddle: A Classic Album Under Review
2007
3.08 | 20 ratings
Retrospectives
2007
2.08 | 16 ratings
The Early Pink Floyd - A Review And Critique
2008
2.24 | 16 ratings
Comfortably Numb
2008
3.00 | 22 ratings
A Technicolor Dream
2008
3.62 | 28 ratings
Live Anthology
2008
1.83 | 20 ratings
The Great Gig In The Sky: The Album By Album Guide
2008
3.99 | 91 ratings
The Story of Wish You Were Here
2012

PINK FLOYD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.19 | 42 ratings
The Best Of The Pink Floyd
1970
3.59 | 404 ratings
Relics
1971
3.30 | 136 ratings
A Nice Pair
1973
2.71 | 65 ratings
Masters Of Rock Vol. 1
1974
2.22 | 219 ratings
A Collection of Great Dance Songs
1981
2.22 | 157 ratings
Works
1983
4.00 | 2 ratings
Hits
1983
3.52 | 101 ratings
Shine On
1992
3.67 | 126 ratings
The Early Singles
1992
4.60 | 15 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon (Twentieth Anniversary Edition)
1993
3.10 | 75 ratings
1967: The First Three Singles
1997
3.46 | 269 ratings
Echoes - The Best of Pink Floyd
2001
4.08 | 89 ratings
Oh By The Way...
2007
2.88 | 65 ratings
A Foot In The Door: The Best Of Pink Floyd
2011
4.45 | 82 ratings
Discovery
2011
4.78 | 142 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon - Experience Edition
2011
4.64 | 138 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon - Immersion Edition
2011
4.74 | 156 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Experience Edition
2011
4.54 | 126 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Immersion Edition
2011
4.34 | 93 ratings
The Wall - Experience Edition
2011
1.98 | 62 ratings
The Wall Singles
2011
3.91 | 106 ratings
The Wall - Immersion Edition
2012
4.18 | 50 ratings
The Division Bell (20th Anniversary Deluxe Box)
2014
3.94 | 61 ratings
The Early Years 1967-1972 Creation
2016
3.45 | 12 ratings
The Early Years Continu/ation 1967-1974 Sessions
2016
4.66 | 19 ratings
The Early Years 1965-1967 Cambridge St/ation
2017
4.16 | 19 ratings
The Early Years 1968 Germin/Ation
2017
3.62 | 20 ratings
The Early Years 1969 Dramatis/ation
2017
4.42 | 22 ratings
The Early Years 1970 Devi/ation
2017
3.54 | 18 ratings
The Early Years 1971 Reverber/ation
2017
3.63 | 19 ratings
The Early Years 1972 Obfusc/ation
2017
3.86 | 28 ratings
The Later Years 1987 - 2019
2019
3.33 | 9 ratings
Transmissions + 1969
2020

PINK FLOYD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.58 | 89 ratings
Arnold Layne
1967
3.35 | 101 ratings
See Emily Play
1967
2.80 | 64 ratings
Apples And Oranges
1967
2.63 | 67 ratings
Tonite Let's All Make Love In London
1967
3.67 | 33 ratings
Flaming
1967
3.42 | 50 ratings
It Would Be So Nice
1968
3.70 | 50 ratings
Point Me at the Sky
1968
2.93 | 46 ratings
The Nile Song
1969
3.85 | 81 ratings
One Of These Days
1971
4.00 | 21 ratings
Free Four
1972
4.00 | 12 ratings
Free Four / Absolutely Curtains
1972
3.78 | 93 ratings
Money
1973
3.61 | 84 ratings
Time
1973
3.64 | 75 ratings
Have a Cigar
1975
3.50 | 7 ratings
Pigs on the Wing / Sheep
1977
4.50 | 8 ratings
Pigs (Three Different Ones)
1977
3.83 | 79 ratings
Comfortably Numb
1979
3.67 | 88 ratings
Another Brick In The Wall
1979
3.44 | 69 ratings
Run Like Hell
1980
3.29 | 61 ratings
When the Tigers Broke Free
1982
1.99 | 59 ratings
Not Now John/The Hero's Return (Part 2)
1983
2.52 | 65 ratings
Learning To Fly (promo single)
1987
3.03 | 59 ratings
On the Turning Away
1987
2.98 | 41 ratings
One Slip
1988
3.00 | 21 ratings
A Momentary Lapse Of Reason Official Tour CD
1988
2.89 | 24 ratings
Shine On - Selections From The Box
1992
3.24 | 79 ratings
High Hopes/ Keep Talking (single)
1994
3.36 | 64 ratings
Take It Back
1994
3.33 | 9 ratings
Interview Disc
1995
2.88 | 168 ratings
London '66-'67
1999
4.11 | 53 ratings
Louder Than Words
2014
2.73 | 20 ratings
Pink Floyd 1965 - Their First Recordings
2015
3.10 | 31 ratings
Hey Hey Rise Up (feat. Andriy Khlyvnyuk)
2022

PINK FLOYD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Early Singles by PINK FLOYD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 1992
3.67 | 126 ratings

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The Early Singles
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 546

"The Early Singles" is a compilation of Pink Floyd and was released in 1992. It features the band's first three singles, the Syd Barrett's singles, which were written mostly by their band leader, Sid Barrett and the two first post-Syd singles.

"Arnold Layne" was the first Pink Floyd's single and was released on 11 March 1967, "See Emily Play" was the second Pink Floyd's single and was released on 16 June 1967, "Apples And Oranges" was the third Pink Floyd's single and was released on 18 November 1967, "It Would Be So Nice" was the fourth Pink Floyd's single and was released in 12 April 1968 and "Point Me At The Sky" was the fifth Pink Floyd's single and was released in 17 December 1968.

"The Early Singles" has ten tracks. The first track "Arnold Layne" was the A side of the first Pink Floyd's single. It was a non-album's song. It was written by Syd Barrett and was released on "Relics". This is a song featured on numerous others Pink Floyd's compilations. It hasn't any sort of prog rock sound but it's nice to hear. It's a good introduction to the music of Pink Floyd in Barrett's era. The second track "Candy And A Currant Bun" was the B side of the debut Pink Floyd's single "Arnold Layne". It was also a non-album's song. It was also written by Sid Barrett and it's also a song featured on numerous others Pink Floyd's compilations. This is a good song with some controversial letters, a classic song of their earlier psychedelic phase. The third track "See Emily Play" was the A side of the second Pink Floyd's single. It was also released as a non-album's song. Still, the song appeared on the American edition of "The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn". It was also another song written by Sid Barrett. It also appears on "Relics" and on many other Pink Floyd's compilations. This is a song with an uplifting tune. I really love that psychedelic vibe. The fourth track "Scarecrow" was the B side of their second single "See Emily Play". "The Scarecrow" was also released on the original edition of Pink Floyd's debut "The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn". This was also written by Sid Barrett. It also appears on many other Pink Floyd's compilations. It's a short song with an interesting and strange sound. It's a psychedelic song with a kind of a medieval sound with nice keyboards and interesting percussion. The fifth track "Apples And Oranges" was the A side of the third single of Pink Floyd. It's another non-album's song. It was also written by Syd Barrett. It's his final song written for Pink Floyd. It was also released on other Pink Floyd's compilations. It's meandering. Barrett's guitar playing is great with an interesting metallic tone. The sixth track "Paint Box" was the B side of their third single. It's another non-album's song. This is a song written by Richard Wright. It was also released on "Relics" despite be included on many other Pink Floyd's compilations. It's a quality piece of pop-psychedelic music. It points more towards to the spacier direction the band would take without Barrett. The seventh track "It Would Be So Nice" was the A side of the fourth single of Pink Floyd. It's one more non- album's song. It was a song written by Richard Wright and it was also released on other Pink Floyd's compilations. It's a decent psychedelic song with some different sections. Some parts are cool. Overall it's a decent song. The eighth track "Julia Dream" was the B side of their single "It Would Be So Nice". It's another non-album's song. It was written by Roger Waters and it also appears on "Relics". It also appears on numerous other Pink Floyd's compilations. It's a psychedelic folk song that oddly reminds me of The Moody Blues. It's pretty decent. The ninth track "Point Me At The Sky" was the A side of their fifth single. It's another non-album's song. It was a song with collaboration between Roger Waters and David Gilmour. It was also included on other Pink Floyd's compilations. It's a good psychedelic song that alternates between quiet and loud sections. The loud sections are actually pretty good. The tenth track "Careful With That Axe, Eugene" was the B side of their single "Point Me At The Sky". It's another non-album's song. It's an instrumental written by all band's members. It also appears on "Relics". It's an early classic of Pink Floyd, a great instrumental, very dynamic. Each musician contributes very well, from Water's bass riff, Wright's great organ playing, Gilmour's textural guitar and Mason's drumming, controlling the dynamic well.

Conclusion: "The Early Singles" is a compilation album of Pink Floyd that provides in an only single album, the first five Pink Floyd's singles that were released in UK. This wasn't absolutely true for the U.S. market. In the U.S. market, the third single of Pink Floyd was "Flaming" with "The Gnome" as the B side and the fourth single was "Let There Be More Light" with "Remember A Day" as the B side. So, "The Early Singles" has many common points with "1967: The First Three Singles" and is also very similar to many other Pink Floyd's compilations like "The Best Of Pink Floyd" and "Masters Of Rock Vol. 1". About the tracks on "The Early Singles", all are great with the exception of "Apples And Oranges" which is, in my humble opinion, a very disjointed song that shows unfortunately, but perfectly well, the state of dementia of Syd Barrett's mind. So, we may say that "The Early Singles" is a good and important compilation for all hard Pink Floyd's fans that can have all the first five singles on a chronological order and all only on a single album.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 The Wall by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1979
4.10 | 3158 ratings

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The Wall
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by WJA-K

5 stars Who am I fooling? I guess I fooled myself for years. Thinking that this album isn't as awesome as I perceived it when I was young.

This album got me hooked. It turned me into a Pink Floyd fan. I can't recall how often I played this one. Over and over. I knew every second. Was amazed from start to finish.

Then years passed And I got into DSOTM, WYWH, Atom Heart Mother, Animals. I started to like them more and more. Listened to The Wall less and less. I started to believe the people who said The Wall was bloated, self-indulgent, self- important, and a megalomanic Waters solo project.

Then I started listening to it again, a few weeks back. And I am back at loving it. The story is amazing. One of the best concepts in rock history. The songs are constructed so well and elevate the story.

I am also amazed by how Pink Floyd managed to stand firm amidst the punk and new-wave storm that blew away most of the other progressive bands. They reinvented themselves again. As they did so many times before.

This is a solid 5 star album. Making it four in a row from this great band.

 The Division Bell by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.75 | 2149 ratings

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The Division Bell
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review N 523

"The Division Bell" is the fourteenth studio album of Pink Floyd and was released in 1994. It was released seven years after "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason". "The Division Bell" is a kind of a conceptual album where large part of the album deals with issues of communication or the lack of it. The global idea is that many of life's problems can be solved through dialogue. Songs like "Poles Apart" and "Lost For Words" are sometimes interpreted as referring to the problems of communication between the ex-member Roger Waters and the other members of the group. However, Gilmour denied that the album is an allegory about the separation of the group and Nick Masson said that the message on the album does have some meaning because it's about people making choices, saying yes or no, during their lives.

The general theme of communication is reflected in the title of the album. It was inspired by "The Division Bell" used in the United Kingdom Parliament. It's a resource used in the United Kingdom Parliament when voting a motion, opinions are divided and it becomes necessary to call MP's to vote, indicating that a vote is to take place. The recording of the album took place in several locations, including the band's Britannia Row Studios and Gilmour's houseboat Astoria.

The line up on the album is David Gilmour (lead vocals, electric guitar, acoustic guitar, bass guitar, keyboards and programming), Richard Wright (vocals and keyboards) and Nick Mason (drums and percussion). The abum had also the participation of the guest musicians Jon Carin (keyboards), Bob Ezrin (keyboards and percussion), Dick Parry (tenor saxophone), Guy Pratt (bass), Tim Renwick (guitars), Gary Wallis (acoustic and electronic percussion) and the backing vocals of Sam Brown, Carol Kanyon, Rebecca Leigh-White, Durga McBroom and Jackie Sheridan.

"The Division Bell" has eleven tracks. The first track "Cluster One" is a peaceful and quiet ambivalent music, which then segues into 3 songs of Gilmour's guitar stealing the show, leading the music with an almost effulgent quality. The second track "What Do You Want From Me" is a hard song with strong tempo, heavy guitar but with very melodious vocals. Gilmour's sudden vocal key change transforms the track beautifully. This is a strong number, maybe a bit commercial, that sets the stage for the melancholic songs that are to follow. The third track "Poles Apart" fades in with a quality and moody acoustic phrase and never loses its charm which brings Pink Floyd right back to the early 70's. Gilmour's vocals are bright and inspiring maintaining the nostalgic and slightly melancholy mood of the song. The fourth track "Marooned" is a great composition with an excellent composition and sustained time signatures that can only be filled up with a patient guitar player like Gilmour. It explores Gilmour guitar virtuosity, augmented by a great piano touch. The fifth track "A Great Day For Freedom" has a duality of moods with the piano being melancholic while the melody and lyrics are more optimistic and hopeful. Gilmour provides an impressive lead during the song. The sixth track "Wearing The Inside Out" is may be Gilmour's most impressive musical performance, between the melodic vocals and various guitar textures. Wright performs lead vocals here. The saxophone solo right at the jump by Dick Parry sets a great mood. The seventh track "Take It Back" is another strong track with more great guitar work from Gilmour, and some precise drumming from Mason. It's probably a bit more commercial and poppy but it still is a very good song. The eighth track "Coming Back To Life" starts with a gentle bluesy guitar intro and is overall a good listen. However, Gilmour seems to have the habit of projecting his own guilt back at the audience and the lyrics on this song illustrate that fact. The ninth track "Keep Talking" has a masterful arrangement starting with the vocal interludes by Stephen Hawking to the extensive use of a "talk box" and the call and response of the verses between Gilmour and the female chorus. The tenth track "Lost For Words" fades in masterfully with a deep organ before it finally gets to the folkish, acoustic heart of the song, completed with slight accordion and honky piano and a fine acoustic lead in the outro of the song. The eleventh track "High Hopes" starts with joyous bells in the distance of a rural scene, the lyrics speak of the things one may have gained and lost in life. Fittingly, the song concludes with a fine, bluesy guitar lead by Gilmour.

Conclusion: "The Division Bell" is a great album. It's the best album released by Pink Floyd since "The Wall". It's an album without a weak track. However, it isn't an easy listening at the first time. It demands a number of listenings to can fully appreciate it properly. "The Division Bell" is, for me, the sixth best studio album released by the group, after "Meddle", "Dark Side Of The Moon", "Which You Were Here", "Animals" and "The Wall". However, it doesn't represent, for me, a masterpiece. It's true that it's almost a perfect album but I sincerely think it lacks to it something to can have that status. In reality, I feel it lacks to it the creativity and the irreverence of Roger Waters. Nevertheless, "The Division Bell" is a great way to end the musical career of one of the greatest progressive bands that already existed in the world.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Hey Hey Rise Up (feat. Andriy Khlyvnyuk) by PINK FLOYD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 2022
3.10 | 31 ratings

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Hey Hey Rise Up (feat. Andriy Khlyvnyuk)
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by SuperMetro

4 stars I think this is a really good track. I like what they did with that acapella video on Instagram and then made it into a full-blown song. I really like the atmosphere of the song with the foreign vocals and the instrumentation. Then the guitar solo is a solo that is a typical Gilmour solo. Gilmour never fails to impress with these kinds of solos. Then the voice kicks in again, and then the song ends. My only problem is that this is not really a Pink Floyd song, and is in name only since only half of the members are there. Roger is too picky, and Rick is dead.
 A Momentary Lapse of Reason by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1987
3.07 | 1822 ratings

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A Momentary Lapse of Reason
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 519

"A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" is the thirteenth studio album of Pink Floyd and was released in 1987. After the release of "The Final Cut" in 1983, the members of the band went for separate ways until 1987. In 1985 David Gilmour began to assemble a group of musicians to work on his third solo studio album but in the end of 1986 he changed his mind, and decided that the new material composed by him would instead be included as a new Pink Floyd's album. So, he decided to revive the band with Nick Mason and Richard Wright. However, for legal reasons Wright couldn't be a member of the band. Due to that, he only participated on "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" as a musician paid weekly.

After the release of "The Final Cut" in 1983, succeeded a harsh legal dispute with Roger Waters who left the group in 1985, and Gilmour and Mason won the legal rights to use the name of Pink Floyd and Waters won the rights to some of the images of Pink Floyd, including almost all the characters of "The Wall" and all the rights of "The Final Cut".

So, "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" is a very different and special album in the musical career of the group because it would became the first Pink Floyd's album since the departure of their founder member, the lyricist, bassist and one of the main composers of the group, Roger Waters. And mainly due to that, "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" was heavily criticized for having less substance than an album released in the musical era of Roger Waters. It's commonly accepted that "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" is one of the weakest studio works released by the band and especially Roger Waters' fans never accepted it as a Pink Floyd's album. Waters himself, referred to it as being a reasonable forgery.

"A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" has eleven tracks. The first track "Signs Of Life" conjures a "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" throwback vibe on this opening instrumental, which is well-sequenced before the crashing opening of "Learning To Fly". Wright makes his return to the band with some synthesizer work. The second track "Learning To Fly" is a focused well-produced rock song with great backing vocals in the chorus, that nods to the band's spirit of experimentation, but still stays accessible throughout. The lyrics on this track are excellent. The third track "The Dogs Of War" is the song on the album where the lyrics sort of take center stage, is as unsmiling and strident as anything Waters ever wrote. It's not quite eloquent enough to catch my best full attention. The fourth track "One Slip" is an atmospheric track with some poetic lyrics. The lyrics get a bit clunky here and there. Still, the sweeping chorus and the pinball sound effects at the start give a kind of a fun touch to the song. The fifth track "On The Turning Away" has a beautiful melody. The melody is one of the loveliest in the band's catalog, while the words are humbly poetic and subtly stirring. Gilmour gets the chance for an extended solo at the end. This is probably the best song released under the Pink Floyd's banner after Waters' exit. The sixth track "Yet Another Movie" and the seventh track "Round And Round" are linked together. It's a cold and dark piece, monotone and repetitive that turns a bit into a predictable and boring song. It's very strange and difficult to understand why they decided to divide this song in two parts. Sincerely, I can't see any substantial difference between them. The eighth track "A New Machine Part One" and the tenth track "A New Machine Part Two" are also linked together. The two parts of this track are positioned as the bread of a sandwich for which "Terminal Frost" is the meat, making this one of the most askew and forgettable song suites the band has ever attempted. The vocoder effect on Gilmour's voice with the lack of any real instrumentation behind it is a striking effect, but that's all that's really here. The ninth track "Terminal Frost" isn't brilliant but sounds as a good jamming session. If you're looking for tasteful if passionless soundtrack material, then you've come to the right place. But you bought a Pink Floyd's album, so you're probably quite disappointed. The eleventh track "Sorrow" has some great playing of Gilmour as well as some lyrics from him that are good enough to get by. But, the whole thing never rises above the moody, airless atmosphere it maintains, making of it a closing track that fails to ignite. Still, it's one of the best tracks.

Conclusion: "The Final Cut" was a personal Roger Waters' bet, and is largely based on Waters' life, the loss of his father in World War II and his personal concept about the war. All composition duties belong only to Waters and its release was only exclusively decided by him. So, as I wrote before when I reviewed "The Final Cut", is less a Pink Floyd's album and more a solo project of Waters. Despite "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" be a totally different kind of a project, I think we can consider that there are some common points. The album was to be released as a solo project of Gilmour. Waters was no longer in the band and Wright only participats as a guest musician and not as a band's member. Almost all composition duties belong to Gilmour. The songs not composed by him aren't composed by any other band's member. So, "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" can also be considered a personal project of Gilmour. So and probably, "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" should never have been realized as a Pink Floyd's album too, really.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Animals by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.53 | 3921 ratings

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Animals
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by WJA-K

5 stars This is the first Floyd album I ever listened to. It happened to be the only Floyd record available at my library. I didn't have money to buy my own records, so it was my only way to get access to album music. Animals introduced me to a whole new world of music. I must have played it 100 times in two weeks.

These days, it is as relevant as it was in 1977, sadly. The lyrics are a punch in the gut indeed.

I still love it. I am happy it has been re-discovered these days as one of their greater albums. It ranks nr 2 or 3 on my Floyd list after WYWH, in fierce competition with Dark Side.

Dogs - Why is David Gilmour arguably the best guitarist ever? Well, this brilliant song has 5 different guitar solos that can all compete to be the best ever. It is only scratching the surface of what he did for Pink Floyd. 10/10

Pigs - A brilliant fierce attack on the pigs, those who rule the world in a ruthless way. The lyrics are outstanding. Guitar, base, keys and drums are too. 10/10

Sheep - Wright and Waters steal the show on this with their awesome keys and great baseline. But everyone shines. 10/10

Pigs on the Wing part I and II bookend the album in a fitting way. No rating (too short).

This is a near-perfect album. Their last one. 5 stars.

 The Final Cut by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1983
3.19 | 1952 ratings

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The Final Cut
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Review N 515

"The Final Cut" is the twelfth studio album of Pink Floyd and was released in 1983. It was originally planned to be as a soundtrack album for the band's 1982 Pink Floyd's film, "The Wall". However, with the onset of the Falklands' war, Roger Waters changed it to be a general critique of war and a direct critique to the Falklands' war, a military action unnecessary to him. So, "The Final Cut" is an anti-war conceptual album, whose lyrics regards as the betrayal of the people, like his father, who during World War II sacrificed their lives in the spirit of a post-war dream. This post-war dream was the hope of a better world. That victory should have brought a more peaceful world, where whose political leaders would no longer resolve their disputes resorting to the war. The album is dedicated to the memory of his father.

"The Final Cut" is their last album to include Roger Waters. David Gilmour and Nick Mason maintained the legal rights for using the Pink Floyd's name. Richard Wright had already left the band after the release of "The Wall". So, the line up on the album is David Gilmour (vocals and guitar), Roger Waters (vocals, bass guitar, acoustic guitar, synthesiser and sound effects) and Nick Mason (drums, percussion and sound effects). The album has also some additional musicians: Andy Bown (Hammond organ), Ray Cooper (percussion), Michael Kamen (piano and harmonium), Andy Newmark (drums) and Raphael Ravenscroft (saxophone). It has also the participation of the National Philharmonic Orchestra.

"The Final Cut" has twelve tracks. The first track "The Post War Dream" serves as an introduction to both the concept and the music. It's a short opening but represents a good indicator of what will be the general mood of the album. The second track "Your Possible Pasts" has a good use of the extreme dynamics technique. It's very powerful yet not stereotypical in any way, but is perhaps a bit too much minimalist on the instrumental parts. The lyrics are good as usual. The third track "One Of The Few" is another tiny song, with a good melody. I like that concept of reusing the melody. It gives the album more of a conceptual feel, something that the album can't get enough of, I think. The fourth track "The Hero's Return" has a good melody and the same goes for the vocals and lyrics. The sound is very much in the same vein of the rest of the album. It leads perfectly into the next track, one of the stand- out tracks on the album. The fifth track "The Gunners Dream" is an emotional well written anti-war song. It's another good track which carries on the sad feeling of the album. It has nice piano playing and a very good guitar solo. This is Waters again at his best lyrically. The sixth track "Paranoid Eyes" is also a good song. It has a nice piano on it and is very smooth and quiet. It's sad, but beautiful. It's a slow and brooding song that shows the disillusionment that a veteran has in the world after the war. The seventh track "Get Your Filthy Hands Off My Desert" is a very short song, a kind of a sort of a break that starts with an explosion. It's a quite strange song that is an interlude. It's not bad, but could have been left of the album. The eighth track "The Fletcher Memorial Home" is one of the strongest political songs on the album with some amazing lyrics. It has a great orchestral section and some nice time signatures and chords. It has a great Gilmourish guitar solo too. The ninth track "Southampton Dock" is a song very short, almost half of it is more of a passage into the title track. It's a nice song, again back to the emotional lyrics and that is only played out just by the acoustic guitar and Roger's vocals. The tenth track "The Final Cut" is the title track. It's one of the highlights on the album. It has great lyrics, as usual, related to the previous album. The song starts out quiet, but reaches several climaxes. It has also a great guitar solo too. The eleventh track "Not Now John" is a great rock song. It has a different style, a definite departure from the rest of the album. It's the heaviest song that doesn't fits in with the other songs. It represents the only contribution of Gilmour on the vocals. The twelfth track "Two Suns In The Sunset" is a pleasant piece with a great sax solo, a great memorable riff and some great lyrics. It's mostly a quiet song mainly played on acoustic guitar. It closes the album well.

Conclusion: "The Wall" was personal Roger Waters' bet, and is largely based on Roger's life. "The Final Cut" is also a personal Roger's bet. It's a kind of "The Wall" part two, but it hasn't the creativity and quality enough to be considered equal to "The Wall". Still, it has enough cohesion, consistency and balance, to be considered a good album. I think "The Final Cut" is different due to several things. Richard Wright was no more in the band because was fired by Waters after the recordings of "The Wall". David Gilmour and Nick Mason only participated on the album very few. They were practically two more other guest musicians, especially Nick Mason that no longer drumming on all the tracks of the album. On "The Wall" four songs weren't composed by Roger Waters. On "The Final Cut" all compositions belong only to Waters. The release was exclusively decided by Waters and its concept was also a Roger's project. Thus, "The Final Cut" is more a solo project of Waters. So, "The Final Cut" should never have been realized as a Pink Floyd's album. If it was released as Waters' album, it would be probably considered his best solo musical work. So, 3 stars to this album.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 Atom Heart Mother by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.89 | 2366 ratings

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Atom Heart Mother
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by WJA-K

4 stars Sometimes artists create something they grow to hate later. This is the case for Atom Heart Mother. Both Waters and Gilmour consider it to be very bad.

I don't agree. I think this album is great. It is a fantastic album in itself. Both sides are awesome. And it is a major stepping stone to the Pink Floyd we all know so well.

My journey with Pink Floyd started in the early eighties, I was about 14 years old. Atom Heart Mother quickly became one of my favourites. It started with the Atom Heart Mother suite. It was so overwhelming. I never had heard something like this before. This was so great, so creative. So fantastic.

I learned to love the tracks on the B-side later. It's such a contrast to the A-side. Simple songs, but oh so beautiful. The only thing I never understood was Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast.

Atom Heart Mother Suite - A masterful track. I can only love it very much 10/10

If - A simple Roger Waters song. The quiet after the storm 7/10

Summer '68 - Perhaps the best track from the B-side. I love the trumpet part, the bombast 9/10

Fat Old Sun - Gilmour's part on the B-side is the simplest of blues ballads. Elevated by a fantastic guitar solo at the end. Gilmour gives us a glimpse of what is to come here. 9/10

Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast - Too weird for my taste. 5/10

Is this a 5-star album? Is it comparable with Wish You Were Here? With In the Court? With Close to the Edge? I don't think so. It deserves 4 stars, just like Fragile.

 Ummagumma by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.47 | 1827 ratings

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Ummagumma
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by WJA-K

2 stars Where to start with this one? This is not the Pink Floyd I love. I am a big Pink Floyd fan. I adore many of their other albums. This one doesn't do it for me. But It's not a 1-star album either. This album shows us an important step in PF's development.

The first album is great, being 4 live recordings of their early classics. This side deserves an 8/10

Album 2 is another matter entirely.

Sysyphus has some nice bits and pieces, but some complete weirdness that is off-putting to me 5/10

Grantchester Meadows is a nice easy track with very interesting sound effects. 8/10

Several Species ... - is nice as a novelty. But it is not for repeated listening. 5/10

The Narrow Way - is an interesting piece of instrumental music, ending with Gilmour singing beautifully. There's some resemblance with Echoes, which they will create a few years later. 7/10

The Grand Vizier - Doesn't do it for me 4/10

All in all, Ummagumma isn't the disastrous record many people claim it to be. But it is far from a masterpiece. Having said this, it is highly recommended for PF fans and prog fans in general. 2 stars.

 Meddle by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.30 | 3336 ratings

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Meddle
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by WJA-K

4 stars Pink Floyd is one of my favourite bands. I love them since I was 14. I didn't grow up with them. I discovered them when a teacher played The Wall entirely in music class. The classic four are my top 4. Meddle is close to this. But it doesn't only have highlights for me. That said, the highlights are super high.

One of These Days - One of the first tracks I knew from Pink Floyd. I love it. The bass, the guitar, everything. 10/10

A Pillow of Winds - Charming song. But not memorable for me 7/10

Fearless - I like this one. It has some punch. 7/10

San Tropez - Forgettable 6/10

Seamus - Apart from the barking of the dog, it's also a corny blues song. Not my cup of tea 5/10

Echoes- Classic. How can this be on the same album as Seamus? So happy this covers half of the record. Half a record of greatness.

This album has two classic tracks, 3 okay-ish songs and a rubbish one. Normally this would bring me to 2 or 3 stars. But we are talking Echoes here. This makes the album 4 stars.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to NotAProghead for the last updates

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