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PINK FLOYD

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


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Pink Floyd biography
Formed in 1965 in London, UK - Disbanded in 1994 - Reunited with different formation on several ocasions

One of the biggest bands of all time

Of all the bands who come under the progressive rock banner, Pink Floyd are, arguably, the act most recognisable in the wider music community to music lovers of all genres. Yet, as revealed famously by Nick Mason in an old interview, even at the height of their fame, they could walk down any street, and passers-by would not have recognised a member of one of the most commercially successful acts in music history.

The band were formed in London in 1965, the original members being Roger (known as Syd) BARRETT on vocals and lead guitar, Nick MASON on drums, Roger WATERS on bass guitar and vocals, and Rick WRIGHT on keyboards.

The London of the late 1960's was a melting pot of live acts and varying musical genres, and the band gained a cult following amongst the underground psychedelic crowd of the time. This expanded into a more public consciousness with a residency at the famous UFO Club, with a hypnotic light show and pulsating, often indescribable, sounds. This led to television appearances, most famously an interview and live performance on BBC The Look of the Week, with a rather bemused classical performer Hans Keller in tow. Waters was famously asked just why everything had to be so loud?!

This popularity led to the band signing to EMI, who in 1967 released two hit singles, Arnold Layne, which attracted controversy regarding its cross-dressing themes, and See Emily Play. They charted in the UK at 20 and 6 respectively.

The debut album which followed, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, is universally recognised as being hugely influential in rock music, beyond the narrow confines of psychedelia. It peaked at number 6 in the UK album charts in 1967, and the band continued to play not only their residency, but also increasing numbers of national gigs and festivals.

The strain, however, was beginning to tell on Barrett, and a fragile mental state, exacerbated by LSD, led to him becoming almost semi-detached from the band and wider reality. The situation became such that the band, at the end of 1967, drafted in David GILMOUR ...
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PINK FLOYD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

PINK FLOYD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 2080 ratings
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
1967
3.67 | 1821 ratings
A Saucerful of Secrets
1968
3.14 | 1395 ratings
More (OST)
1969
3.47 | 1767 ratings
Ummagumma
1969
3.90 | 2282 ratings
Atom Heart Mother
1970
4.30 | 3250 ratings
Meddle
1971
3.37 | 1618 ratings
Obscured by Clouds
1972
4.61 | 4457 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon
1973
4.63 | 4264 ratings
Wish You Were Here
1975
4.53 | 3829 ratings
Animals
1977
4.10 | 3067 ratings
The Wall
1979
3.19 | 1887 ratings
The Final Cut
1983
3.06 | 1770 ratings
A Momentary Lapse of Reason
1987
3.75 | 2084 ratings
The Division Bell
1994
3.31 | 866 ratings
The Endless River
2014

PINK FLOYD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.40 | 581 ratings
Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1988
3.97 | 798 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
4.11 | 503 ratings
Is There Anybody Out There?
2000
3.96 | 16 ratings
Live at Knebworth 1990
2021

PINK FLOYD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.77 | 535 ratings
Live at Pompeii
1981
4.11 | 575 ratings
The Wall (The Movie)
1982
3.68 | 186 ratings
In Concert - Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1989
2.99 | 59 ratings
La Carrera Panamericana
1992
4.45 | 548 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
3.12 | 94 ratings
London - Live 66-67
1999
4.59 | 662 ratings
Live at Pompeii (The Director's Cut)
2003
4.08 | 185 ratings
Classic Albums: The Dark Side Of The Moon
2003
2.94 | 57 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd
2003
3.30 | 68 ratings
The Pink Floyd & Syd Barrett Story
2003
2.41 | 32 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd Volume 2 - A Critical Review 1975 - 1996
2005
2.27 | 17 ratings
The Ultimate Review
2005
2.00 | 20 ratings
The World's Greatest Albums - Atom Heart Mother
2005
2.51 | 21 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here
2005
1.97 | 20 ratings
Reflections And Echoes
2006
2.78 | 22 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's The Piper At The Gates of Dawn
2006
1.43 | 23 ratings
Rock Milestones: Ummagumma
2006
2.09 | 14 ratings
Music Box Biographical Collection
2006
2.32 | 19 ratings
The Dark Side - Interviews
2006
2.28 | 16 ratings
Total Rock Review
2006
2.51 | 19 ratings
Meddle: A Classic Album Under Review
2007
3.13 | 19 ratings
Retrospectives
2007
2.13 | 15 ratings
The Early Pink Floyd - A Review And Critique
2008
2.29 | 15 ratings
Comfortably Numb
2008
3.05 | 21 ratings
A Technicolor Dream
2008
3.61 | 27 ratings
Live Anthology
2008
1.85 | 19 ratings
The Great Gig In The Sky: The Album By Album Guide
2008
4.01 | 89 ratings
The Story of Wish You Were Here
2012

PINK FLOYD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.17 | 40 ratings
The Best Of The Pink Floyd
1970
3.58 | 387 ratings
Relics
1971
3.29 | 129 ratings
A Nice Pair
1973
2.71 | 65 ratings
Masters Of Rock Vol. 1
1974
2.22 | 215 ratings
A Collection of Great Dance Songs
1981
2.22 | 153 ratings
Works
1983
2.00 | 2 ratings
Hits
1983
3.51 | 97 ratings
Shine On
1992
3.71 | 117 ratings
The Early Singles
1992
4.83 | 12 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon (Twentieth Anniversary Edition)
1993
3.09 | 74 ratings
1967: The First Three Singles
1997
3.45 | 264 ratings
Echoes - The Best of Pink Floyd
2001
4.07 | 88 ratings
Oh By The Way...
2007
2.86 | 62 ratings
A Foot In The Door: The Best Of Pink Floyd
2011
4.44 | 79 ratings
Discovery
2011
4.76 | 140 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon - Experience Edition
2011
4.62 | 136 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon - Immersion Edition
2011
4.75 | 153 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Experience Edition
2011
4.53 | 122 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Immersion Edition
2011
4.33 | 90 ratings
The Wall - Experience Edition
2011
1.94 | 60 ratings
The Wall Singles
2011
3.87 | 102 ratings
The Wall - Immersion Edition
2012
4.28 | 47 ratings
The Division Bell (20th Anniversary Deluxe Box)
2014
3.91 | 58 ratings
The Early Years 1967-1972 Creation
2016
3.27 | 7 ratings
The Early Years Continu/ation 1967-1974 Sessions
2016
4.67 | 11 ratings
The Early Years 1965-1967 Cambridge St/ation
2017
4.07 | 11 ratings
The Early Years 1968 Germin/Ation
2017
3.40 | 11 ratings
The Early Years 1969 Dramatis/ation
2017
4.37 | 13 ratings
The Early Years 1970 Devi/ation
2017
3.32 | 12 ratings
The Early Years 1971 Reverber/ation
2017
3.47 | 13 ratings
The Early Years 1972 Obfusc/ation
2017
3.87 | 22 ratings
The Later Years 1987 - 2019
2019
3.29 | 8 ratings
Transmissions + 1969
2020

PINK FLOYD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.58 | 85 ratings
Arnold Layne
1967
3.32 | 96 ratings
See Emily Play
1967
2.78 | 59 ratings
Apples And Oranges
1967
2.62 | 65 ratings
Tonite Let's All Make Love In London
1967
3.56 | 32 ratings
Flaming
1967
3.37 | 46 ratings
It Would Be So Nice
1968
3.70 | 46 ratings
Point Me at the Sky
1968
2.89 | 43 ratings
The Nile Song
1969
3.82 | 77 ratings
One Of These Days
1971
4.19 | 17 ratings
Free Four
1972
4.00 | 10 ratings
Free Four / Absolutely Curtains
1972
3.78 | 89 ratings
Money
1973
3.59 | 80 ratings
Time
1973
3.63 | 71 ratings
Have a Cigar
1975
3.00 | 3 ratings
Pigs on the Wing / Sheep
1977
3.80 | 5 ratings
Pigs (Three Different Ones)
1977
3.79 | 75 ratings
Comfortably Numb
1979
3.67 | 84 ratings
Another Brick In The Wall
1979
3.43 | 65 ratings
Run Like Hell
1980
3.28 | 58 ratings
When the Tigers Broke Free
1982
1.97 | 56 ratings
Not Now John/The Hero's Return (Part 2)
1983
2.54 | 64 ratings
Learning To Fly (promo single)
1987
3.05 | 57 ratings
On the Turning Away
1987
2.99 | 39 ratings
One Slip
1988
2.95 | 21 ratings
A Momentary Lapse Of Reason Official Tour CD
1988
2.88 | 24 ratings
Shine On - Selections From The Box
1992
3.24 | 76 ratings
High Hopes/ Keep Talking (single)
1994
3.38 | 62 ratings
Take It Back
1994
3.33 | 9 ratings
Interview Disc
1995
2.88 | 168 ratings
London '66-'67
1999
4.15 | 50 ratings
Louder Than Words
2014
2.73 | 20 ratings
Pink Floyd 1965 - Their First Recordings
2015

PINK FLOYD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Atom Heart Mother by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.90 | 2282 ratings

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Atom Heart Mother
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Antonio Giacomin

5 stars "Atom Heart Mother"

My favorite Pink Floyd album ever. Two reasons here :

1 ? Musically, the suite "Atom Heart Mother" is the only fusion between progressive rock and orchestra that I really appreciate. To explain this position and to make myself clear, it is the same reason I prefer more a Renaissance album like "Prologue" than the profoundly orchestrated "Scheherazade". The way David Gilmour guitar dives in a sea of strings (what a poor poet I am?), is not less than? wonderful !

On the vinil side 2 we have a beautiful Roger Water ballad (for me one of his best); we have an even nicer ballad from David and? a masterpiece from Rick Wright. "Summer 68" is for me one of the best songs ever composed; and I only have after that to deeply respect Mr. Wright as a musician. Finally, we have the strange "Alanīs Psychedelic Breakfast". l never skip this song, I hear it until the end by means of being respectful to my favourite Pink Floy album?

2 ? The second reason is the amount of beauty and emotion present in this album, beauty that can be found in Rickīs and Davidīs singing; and in the guitar and strings layers on the first side also. I did not find that emotion in no other Pink Floyd album, "Wish You Were Here" is in a distant second place. Another musician that I appreciate too much because the beauty and capacity of transmitting emotions through his songs is Vangelis; but this is subject for others reviews?

 Meddle by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.30 | 3250 ratings

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Meddle
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Antonio Giacomin

5 stars "Meddle"

My second favorite Pink Floyd album ever?

On the low side, beside "Echoes" and "One Of These days", I do not find excellence in the other songs. They are, how is normally said here, "they are good but not essencial".

So, we must set the focus on those two songs, in order to justify this album status as a masterpiece. In "One Of These days" what is there more to be enjoyed are the rhythm section. The bass (if I were to be a musician, I would like to be a bass player), part drives you to a musical way no other bass line may ever conduct you, that bass line cannot be changed in order to preserve the essence of the song! Related to drums, it seems Mr. Mason has always being an underrated drummer. He is one the players I can more easily recognize, he has a very particular way of kicking. And if he changed his playing in this song just a little bit, the whole thing would be compromised as well...

Finally, "Echoes". The great rival of "Atom Heart Mother", and here we see what can be considered the best way the band sing their songs, and it is when Rick and David shares vocal parts. This is the song that made me understand what a "epic" is; and, as well, turned me into a prog fan since? 1979...

PS - By means of curiosity, In the end of de seventies I was a teeneger, and in that slow instrumental part halfway to the end of "Echoes", dominated by Rogerīs rhythm on the bass, I imagined myself slowly riding "Tundro" (from the comic "Herculoids"), through a strange and dark forest...

 More (OST) by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1969
3.14 | 1395 ratings

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More (OST)
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Antonio Giacomin

3 stars "More"

This one may be considered an example of the problems I have when rating an album. It could be three stars, IF the "good parts" got to be overextended to justify it. On the other hand, these "good" parts are good enough to deserve attention from non fans of this band.

What is more in "More"īs contend (pun intended...) ? Lets search inside it :

The first song, "Cirrus Minor", is the best one here, sufficient for justifying the purchasing of this album. Once more the keys of Mr. Wright makes a GREAT difference ! Soft, dreamy, oh what a song !

Second one is "The Nile Song", maybe the heaviest Pink Floyd has ever recorded. It is good to appreciate the shock between the softness in "Cirrus Minor" and the heaviness in "The Nile Song". I really enjoy this pair of songs !

After them, the album presents some very good ballads (Cymbaline, a high point), anda "Green Is The Colour". Between these two I prefer Roger Watersīs "Cymbalyne", but it is clear how David is more able to transmit emotion and softness by his voice and way of singing.

What else ? Experimental songs, Spanish oriented songs. Not more than just interesting. The rating ? 2,5 stars, rounded to 3 because I rounded down WYWH?

 Wish You Were Here by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.63 | 4264 ratings

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Wish You Were Here
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Antonio Giacomin

4 stars "Wish You Were Here"

This is an "Excellent Aquisiton To Any Prog Collection". Can it be considered a masterpiece ? Of course it can, many reviewer chooses exactly this status. But here I set its quality as a four, not five stars. Let me tell you why this was the choice :

1 ? The main reason is that all of a sudden I found myself not hearing it for many years long (yes I am an old rocker, closer to the 60 than to the 50...). It was a surprise to me; I never stopped hearing "Atom Heart Mother", "Meddle" or the less known "Obscured By Clouds". In the moment of that perception I got to understand what people mean when they say "this album didnīt age well". It is a excellent follow up to "Dark Side Of The Moon", maybe is even better, but at some point I started to loose interest on it

2 ? "Atom Heart Mother" and "Meddle" were ALWAYS my preferred ones. So, downgrading "Wish You Were Here" is like a kind of recognizing those as my favorite ones. It does not mean that I love WYWH but... well, I LOVED once Wish You Were Here... If in this site there could be a punctuation 9/10, that would be may grading. There is not, so WYWH is a 4,5 stars rounded to 4?

 Meddle by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.30 | 3250 ratings

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Meddle
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Ian McGregor

2 stars Meddle was the record where Pink Floyd started to leave the raw psychedelics of their 60s and early 70s so that they could be more focused into song writing and much more detailed music. Pretty much the only reason why this album is popular is because of Echoes, because the rest of the album is either just ok or straight out a joke song.

This album, similar to Atom Heart Mother, has each band member shine in each track. One Of These Days has Roger Waters providing some sweet bass lines. A Pillow Of Winds has some great guitar work even if it's a little monotonous. Fearless is a fan- favorite and probably the best of the short tracks, it has a hypnotic guitar line and chorus.

San Tropez is one of the joke songs in the way that it doesn't fit the album at all, it has a western vibe. Seamus is yet another joke song where you can hear dogs barking, yeah that's all I remember about it. Echoes is very clearly the standout of the album and one of their best songs to date. The chorus is very iconic and the jamming section is excellent. It's a very cohesive track.

Echoes definitely deserves the five star rating, but the rest brings it down. A very enjoyable album nonetheless.

 Obscured by Clouds by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.37 | 1618 ratings

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Obscured by Clouds
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by A Crimson Mellotron

3 stars 'Obscured by Clouds' is studio album #7 for Pink Floyd, inarguably the most successful progressive band, that fiercely rejected this label. This eerie and melancholic soundtrack album was released in 1972, having been recorded for around a month and a half that same year. It features a gloomy and unclear cover artwork by Hipgnosis, probably the least interesting and uninspiring of all Pink Floyd sleeves; the picture is supposed to depict a man sitting on a tree but it is so distorted that you could hardly recognize anything man-like in this photograph. Of course, on this album we see the classic lineup of Roger Waters, Rick Wright, Nick Mason and David Gilmour.

Where I agree: Being released the year after 'Meddle' and the year before 'Dark Side', 'Obscured by Clouds' can be safely termed a stopgap release for the band. Being a soundtrack album to a French movie that is certainly unpopular, it lacks the coherence and the continuity of the Pink Floyd album, as it is comprised of ten tracks that are seemingly unrelated, except for the common theme of love. As with the band's other soundtrack album, it is not necessarily and essential and exceptional release; Pink Floyd have achieved much greater things in the albums before and after this one. Still, 'Obscured by Clouds' is a very elegant and tranquil album, with lots of acoustic guitars and dreamy synths by Wright; the vocal performance of Gilmour is also quite lovely and the drumming of Mason is as excellent as ever.

Some highlights of this half-instrumental record are 'Mudmen', a very dark and impressive instrumental that is mainly recognizable for the menacing guitars, 'Childhood's End', one of the more memorable and better-written vocal pieces on the album, 'Free Four', the only single from 'Obscured by Clouds' which is a more laid-back, even sing-along tune, and 'Stay', a nice and peaceful song with Rick Wright on lead vocals. The rest of the songs are not band, they are just more standard, and maybe occasionally dull and sleep-inducing.

All in all, this is a mandatory listen for every Pink Floyd fan for sure but it is not a universally astonishing album, it is more of a transitory one, lacking the dynamics and avant-garde sensation of the previous releases by them.

 The Endless River by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.31 | 866 ratings

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The Endless River
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars The band had thought of a double album, with a first part sung and a second entirely instrumental. History tells us that things went differently, and perhaps it was better this way. After twenty years and following the death of the late Richard Wright in September 2008, the survivors thought that the best way to pay tribute to their friend was to remember him and remind us of him by publishing these recordings that see him as the protagonist. A recognition for the enormous contribution, often overlooked, given to the band's music.

Framing the album in this way we can accept that of the 18 songs only 4 have a complete musical structure: "It's What We Do", "Anisina", "Allons-y" and the concluding poignant "Louder Than Words", the only song sung on text written by Polly Samson (Gilmour's wife). The remaining pieces can be defined as preludes or tails of just sketched pieces. Sound remnants that obviously refer to the sound that made the history of the group. We recognize various phases of their life and the emotions they feel are those of the best moments ... even if we always talk about sketches! Many have criticized that other instrumentals could be transformed into complete songs making the album more usable. Personally, on the other hand, I am happy that the character of the recordings has not been altered too much, which leaves us with that magic of the sometimes meager sounds typical of studio rehearsals. Reworking, rewriting and working on those songs by evolving them into other structures would only have created "hybrids" absolutely not attributable to Floyd.

Part 1 It opens with "Things Left Unsaid" a very suggestive intro that immediately brings us back to the sounds of "The Division Bell", an exciting atmosphere that introduces us to the following "It's What We Do" where the reference to the sounds of "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" it's clear. We are faced with a very intense and inspired piece where the sound interweaving of guitars and keyboards makes your spine shiver. This first part ends with "Ebb And Flow" a delicate fading phrasing by Wright and Gilmour.

Part 2 The initial "Sum" after a brief introduction of keyboards gives way to Mason's pressing rhythm and this time the drums and the classic "Gilmourian" slide are the masters, a decisive rhythm that raises the hitherto very soft tone of the disc. Just to continue on this line, the following "Skins" is proposed with Mason's thumping drumming that reminds us of moments of "Ummagamma". After the outburst, "Unsung" is the one-minute prelude that introduces us to one of the most delicate and intimate moments of the album "Anisina", a beautiful piece built around a simple piano tour played by Gilmour himself on which they graft away via sax and clarinet. All this leads to a fine guitar solo that is very exciting. It is the first song in which Wright does not play ... but it is clear that the dedication is all for him.

Part 3 The first 2 songs "The Lost Art Of Coversation" and the subsequent "On Noodle Street" are short sound moments in ambient style in which Wright's keyboards are in evidence. The EBOW effect of Gilmour's guitar and Wright's synthesizer create in "Night Light" a pleasant dreamy atmosphere that is heavily shattered by the pressing "Allons-y (1)" ... and here the memory runs to "Run Like Hell" . With a masterful mix the piece flows into the majestic sound of the Royal Albert Hall organ played by Wright in a 1968 concert session: "Autumn '68" is a real gem, light years away from the sounds heard so far, but for sure emotional effect. The reprise of "Allons-y (2)" completes a magnificent sonic triad.

Part 4 "Calling" after "Anisina" is the other song that does not include Wright but which in a certain sense celebrates his memory with its sad melody. The psychedelic trip space sounds of "Eyes To Pearls" remind us instead of some passages from "Atom Heart Mother". "Surfacing" takes us back to more recent and modern sounds, the slide helps to raise the atmosphere and you feel that something has to happen, we are approaching the highlight of the album. The final ringing (? remember "High Hopes"?) introduces us to the conclusive "Louder Than Words", the only sung piece of the whole album, practically the final gem of this work. We are faced with a classic Floydian ballad: clear sounds, hoarse voice, sensational choirs and a frightening guitar solo. The tear of emotion is torn again this time and I have to say that this song alone is worth buying the album.

In addition to Gilmour & Mason, the project "The Endless River" included among others: Jon Carin and Damon Iddins on keyboards, Guy Pratt and Bob Ezrin on bass, Gilad Atzmon on sax and backing vocals Louise Marshall, Durga McBroom and Sarah Brown.

As a final piece of advice I would say that listening in my opinion should be done by freeing yourself from the pretense of having "the last" album by P.F. in your hands at all costs. Instead, try to let yourself be carried away by absolutely hypnotic sounds, by melodies even if only sketched, by highly lyrical moments and by references to the very and unique essence of Pink Floyd. Try to imagine them on the study boat immersed in an infinite sequence of rehearsals to find the effective intro, the right phrasing, the intense solo. If you succeed, what you will hear will be the magical sound of the myth that flows and continues to flow on the infinite river of music.

 P-U-L-S-E by PINK FLOYD album cover Live, 1995
3.97 | 798 ratings

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P-U-L-S-E
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by prog_traveller!!

5 stars The greatest hits and the full performance of "The dark side of the moon". Pink Floyd released "Pulse", graphically rendered on the cover as PULSE, their third live album after the live part of "Ummagumma", released in 1969, and "Delicate sound of thunder", from 1988. Just as for the collections, think of "Relics", even the lives of the legendary English band are never "just" a live record. They are a sort of legendary "summa" that must be discovered or rediscovered. Recorded between September and October of the previous year between the Earls Court in London, Hanover, but also Italy, the double album follows the tour that followed the publication of "The division bell", penultimate studio work dated '94, ten years before "The endless river".

"Pulse" retraces, ignoring the chronology, the salient moments of the group's history, also giving fans the complete execution of "The dark side of the moon". One could almost say that "Pulse", heartbeat, already recalls from the title the well-known work of the group in which the "beat" opens and closes what is a great rock work.

What is one of Pink Floyd's masterpieces - for many the absolute masterpiece - in fact occupies almost the entire B side. It is useless to mention, one by one, the ten songs that make up "The dark side", here enhanced by live performance, suffice for all "Breathe", "Time", "The great gig in the sky" and "Us and them". But even if the '73 album has the lion's share, other great albums like "Wish you were here" - title track obviously included - or "The wall" are not forgotten in "Pulse". The magic of "Shine on you crazy diamond", a historical song that Pink Floyd dedicated to their old street mate Syd Barrett, is, as always, creepy. It is no coincidence that he opens the disc, a sign that the past is not forgotten. Immediately after Gilmour, Wright and Mason (Waters had already taken other paths) still pay homage to the "crazy diamond" going back in time. "Astronomy domine", from "The piper at the gates of dawn", the group's debut album dated 1967, with "A saucerful of secrets" among Pink Floyd's "fairy" records, was in fact written by Barrett himself. Gilmour and associates do not forget, however (and how could they?), "The wall", with pearls like "Hey you", "Comfortably numb", but also, as a grand finale, "Run like hell". The band obviously also gives space to the most recent works, reaching the highest peaks with "A great day for freedom" and "High hopes", from "The division bell", and with the classic "Learning to fly", always live a certainty, and "Sorrow", from "A momentary lapse of reason", 1987.

The live is perfect, and even the corresponding DVD titled in the exact same way, (recorded on 20/10/94 at Earls Court in London) gives emotions not just if you are a loyal fan of these rock heroes.

 The Division Bell by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.75 | 2084 ratings

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The Division Bell
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars It is not easy to move on after a divorce, of whatever kind it is. Difficulties must be faced alone and the sense of loneliness can often take over and lead to apathy. Think about what feelings David Gilmour had to experience in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when he had to face two divorces, one professional from Roger Waters and one personal from his first wife. Let's face it, the years following The Wall were anything but simple for Pink Floyd: Waters' immense ego clashed several times with Gilmour, and the bassist, after kicking out Richard Wright, practically transformed one of the most legendary figures of the planet in simple support musician, in order to realize the personal invective against the horrors of war that bears the name of The Final Cut. It is at this point that the incurable rift definitively divided the two souls of Pink Floyd and Gilmour, after closing the door on Waters, took over the reins of the band in an almost surreal atmosphere. As we said before it is not easy to go on after the separation from those who accompanied you for an entire professional life and testimony of this is the not too inspired A Momentary Lapse Of Reason, with which the guitarist would have liked to return to works based more on the music than on topics.

A few years went by and in 1994 Pink Floyd, having definitively welcomed Wright back, managed to erase almost all the mistakes made with the previous album thanks to the publication of The Division Bell. It is with this record that Gilmour, also invigorated by the presence of his new partner Polly Samson, manages to find an excellent balance between the music and the topics it inspires. The main theme of The Division Bell is in fact the lack of communication, which also in the life of the guitarist has been the cause of the rupture of various relationships. Most of the songs focus on how important any form of human communication is, taking advantage of the argument also to get some pebbles off his shoe against his ex-wife and Waters, with whom the band was facing a lawsuit at the time - use of the name Pink Floyd. Musically the record fails to reach the previous heights but is still able to express unparalleled class and elegance. Merit of this is the great harmony that has been established over the years between Gilmour and Wright and it can be said that the guitar and keyboard duets are the plots that support almost all the songs on the album, together with the contribution of the always precise Mason .

The Division Bell opens with the heavenly notes of "Cluster One", an intro of the highest level, in which Gilmour and Wright immediately delight the listener with an exciting instrumental dialogue in crescendo. The next "What Do You Want From Me" features a vigorous rhythm section on which Gilmour screeches his own Startocaster in the verses and is then supported by the backing vocals in the chorus. "Poles Apart" is instead a growing song divided into two parts by an interesting instrumental section and compares the never forgotten founder Syd Barrett (the subject of several tributes by the band over the years) and Waters, accused of being changed over the years. The piece ends with a worthy solo by Gilmour, who then in the following "Marooned" takes the stage by making the guitar talk, scream, cry over the carpet of keyboards offered by Wright. "A Great Day For Freedom" is the only song to deal with social issues and addresses the hope and disillusionment following the fall of the Berlin Wall, while the absolute protagonist of "Wearing The Inside Out" is Wright, who returns to sing in a Pink Floyd song after more than twenty years. The song exudes elegance from every pore and contrasts with the subsequent and almost carefree "Take It Back". "Coming Back To Life", which deals with the divorce from Gilmour's first wife, is one of the best tracks of the lot and develops from a great opening solo and then radiates optimism for over six minutes. Illustrious guest (albeit through a recording) of the subsequent "Keep Talking" is Professor Stephen Hawking, whose words on the importance of verbal communication echo at the beginning of the piece, which then develops on almost psychedelic atmospheres. After the musically negligible "Lost For Words" (which contains a ferocious invective against Waters), the grand finale is entrusted to "High Hopes", the best track of the lot. The last track of the last Pink Floyd album, punctuated by the sound of a bell, is characterized by dark and nostalgic atmospheres, amplified by the instruments that are added as the piece progresses to the memorable steel guitar solo that closes the work.

The disc, initially received negatively by critics perhaps still too tied to the glories of the 70s, was re-evaluated in the following years and followed by a mammoth tour, whose concert at Earls Court in London is represented in the live album PULSE. Subsequently, Pink Floyd ended all activities until the reunion at Live 8 in 2005 and the release of the late Wright's swan song, The Endless River. The Division Bell, while remaining far from the levels of the best albums of the complete quartet, is a worthy closure for Pink Floyd, a good record characterized by more calm and dreamlike atmospheres on which Gilmour will base his subsequent solo works.

 The Final Cut by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1983
3.19 | 1887 ratings

BUY
The Final Cut
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by prog_traveller!!

3 stars It's not a perfect album, but it's full of insights, boasts many wonders and shows all Roger's demons. It is here, even more than usual, that an artist as brilliant as he is wounded and lays bare with all his nightmares and scars. Listening to this record - let yourself be told by those who have been doing it continuously for days - it is as if you are touching all the ghosts of Waters: his madness, his paranoia, his pain. It is a claustrophobic listening.

Here everything is in its place: the hysterical background noises (in an embryonic phase in "The Wall") take shape and meaning. The album deals with many things, and here every regret, resentment and sadness of the author is vented: the despair over the death of his father when he was little more than a newborn, the anger towards the two states contending the current one (all era) war of the Falklands, disgust for the paranoid heads of government, but also the hope born from a dream of an old gunner.

The record opens with the pleasant "The Post War Dream", where a melancholy and angry Waters wonders what they had done to be British. All the "whispered" sadness is then broken by a wave of anger that pushes the young man to scream words of anger and resentment towards the one who, according to the author, destroyed "the post-war dream", Maggie Tatcher, the then first English minister. The tone changes and the following song, "Your Possible Pasts", with its sweet mark broken up by obsessive choruses, simply speaks of that feeling little or no sung by the Floyd, love. Do you remember me, how we used to be? In the following passage an old acquaintance of ours returns: the Scottish teacher who had obsessed the pupil Pink in "The Wall" reappears here and his figure, previously so terrible as to be considered "another brick in the wall", comes out slightly more clean. It turns out that he was a World War II gunner who, having returned home at the end of the war, had nothing to do but teach young minds how to "suffer". Young minds on which to vent all his anger. The teacher is still the protagonist of the most beautiful song of the album, "The Gunner's Dream", where the gunner, returned home despondent and destroyed by the barbarities of war. The piece is structured on a delicate and trembling chord in G major that introduces the verses of sublime beauty and harmony as delicate as complex and articulated, with rhymes embedded within the verses and original and wonderful assonances. After the verse a long saxophone solo erupts as the author screams about how, despite everything, he continues to dream. With "Get Off Your Filthy Hands Of My Desert" opens a "grotesque and satirical" appendix to the disc, then continued by the song "The Fletcher Memorial Home". In this short piece a string quartet intones a movement in G major on which the vocalist's voice stands out clearly, singing about how Tatcher waged a war (that of the Falklands) only to regain patriotism and pride. , represented here with the image of the flag. Only incurable kings and tyrants are allowed in the "Fletcher Memorial Home". This is what Waters imagines: a retirement home for hegemons and dictators, where to lock up (in a way with a clear lack of diplomacy) Nixon, Brezhnev, Haig and, of course, our Maggie. After the catwalk of the desperate cases of politics, a distraught singer wonders why "Did they expect us to treat them with any respect" and then ends, cynical and decisive, saying that, now that the tyrants are all gathered, the final solution can be done ". The atmosphere here changes and the author remembers the day of the death of his father Eric Fletcher Waters in the landing of the allies in Anzio, in '45, the despair of the military in that hurry morning. And among them there was also him, that new father who now rests on a quay in the "southampton dock". With the title track we reach the final of the concept. "The Final Cut" features a petty change in tempo and key from verse and chorus. In this song the unusual theme of love returns, and ends with a terrifying declaration, where the protagonist, on the verge of suicide, drops the knife and sings, disheartened, as "he never had the courage to cut the final". Not Now John - If anyone needed proof that Waters and Gilmour no longer had anything in common, here it is. A messy and coarse song, the only one in which David sings (badly). It was used as a single and sold as well: mah. It has nothing to do with the record, it is the draft of Young Lust. It is like an uninspired slag from a past that is no longer repeatable. Two Suns In The Sunset. There could not have been a more effective ending. And of course it's an apocalyptic ending. Incredible song, which Roger often calls "Two suns" and that's it. It rubs you, it stuns you, it tears you up. Above all it tears you up. I have listened to it a thousand times, and every time that tenor saxophone by Ravenscroft pierces me even if I were a postmodern St. Sebastian. The two suns at sunset evoke a new nuclear explosion. By now everything is upside down and "the sun is in the east": "In my rear view the sun sets / Drowning behind the road bridges / And I think of all the good things / That we have left undone / And I warn of premonitions / Confirmed suspicions / Dell 'holocaust coming ". A child shouts "Dad! Dad ", the brakes lock and you slide with Waters against the truck:" Even if the day is over / Two suns in the sunset / Maybe the human race is at the end ". The gunner's dream has evaporated forever. And after all we are nothing but dust: "And as the windshield melts / My tears evaporate / Leaving only coal to defend / In the end I understand / What few hear: / Coal and diamonds / Enemy and friend / We are all equal / At the end".

Have a good listen and have beautiful nightmares, because even those are needed.

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