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PINK FLOYD

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


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Pink Floyd biography
Formed in 1965 in London, UK - Disbanded in 1994 - Reunited with different formation on several ocasions

One of the biggest bands of all time

Of all the bands who come under the progressive rock banner, Pink Floyd are, arguably, the act most recognisable in the wider music community to music lovers of all genres. Yet, as revealed famously by Nick Mason in an old interview, even at the height of their fame, they could walk down any street, and passers-by would not have recognised a member of one of the most commercially successful acts in music history.

The band were formed in London in 1965, the original members being Roger (known as Syd) BARRETT on vocals and lead guitar, Nick MASON on drums, Roger WATERS on bass guitar and vocals, and Rick WRIGHT on keyboards.

The London of the late 1960's was a melting pot of live acts and varying musical genres, and the band gained a cult following amongst the underground psychedelic crowd of the time. This expanded into a more public consciousness with a residency at the famous UFO Club, with a hypnotic light show and pulsating, often indescribable, sounds. This led to television appearances, most famously an interview and live performance on BBC The Look of the Week, with a rather bemused classical performer Hans Keller in tow. Waters was famously asked just why everything had to be so loud?!

This popularity led to the band signing to EMI, who in 1967 released two hit singles, See Emily Play, which attracted controversy regarding its cross-dressing themes, and Arnold Layne. They charted in the UK at 20 and 6 respectively.

The debut album which followed, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, is universally recognised as being hugely influential in rock music, beyond the narrow confines of psychedelia. It peaked at number 6 in the UK album charts in 1967, and the band continued to play not only their residency, but also increasing numbers of national gigs and festivals.

The strain, however, was beginning to tell on Barrett, and a fragile mental state, exacerbated by LSD, led to him becoming almost semi-detached from the band and wider reality. The situation became such that the band, at the end of 1967, drafted in David GILMOUR ...
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The Dark Side of the MoonThe Dark Side of the Moon
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Pink Floyd: The Wall (25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)Pink Floyd: The Wall (25th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)
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Sony Legacy 2005
$13.99
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The WallThe Wall
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The Dark Side of the MoonThe Dark Side of the Moon
Pink Floyd Records 2016
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Wish You Were HereWish You Were Here
Legacy 2016
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Pink Floyd - PulsePink Floyd - Pulse
Multiple Formats
Legacy 2006
$13.99
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The Later YearsThe Later Years
Legacy 2019
$289.88
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AnimalsAnimals
Legacy 2016
$22.10
$19.89 (used)
Echoes: The Best of Pink FloydEchoes: The Best of Pink Floyd
Legacy 2016
$12.65
$10.34 (used)
Wish You Were HereWish You Were Here
Parlophone (Wea) 2011
$20.66
$28.50 (used)

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PINK FLOYD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

PINK FLOYD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 1943 ratings
The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn
1967
3.66 | 1695 ratings
A Saucerful Of Secrets
1968
3.15 | 1295 ratings
More (OST)
1969
3.48 | 1649 ratings
Ummagumma
1969
3.89 | 2142 ratings
Atom Heart Mother
1970
4.30 | 3059 ratings
Meddle
1971
3.38 | 1503 ratings
Obscured By Clouds
1972
4.60 | 4221 ratings
Dark Side Of The Moon
1973
4.63 | 4024 ratings
Wish You Were Here
1975
4.52 | 3610 ratings
Animals
1977
4.09 | 2881 ratings
The Wall
1979
3.18 | 1759 ratings
The Final Cut
1983
3.06 | 1656 ratings
A Momentary Lapse Of Reason
1987
3.74 | 1950 ratings
The Division Bell
1994
3.34 | 770 ratings
The Endless River
2014

PINK FLOYD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.39 | 546 ratings
Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1988
3.95 | 748 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
2.86 | 161 ratings
Live 66-67
1999
4.11 | 481 ratings
Is There Anybody Out There?
2000

PINK FLOYD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.77 | 508 ratings
Live At Pompeii
1981
4.10 | 540 ratings
The Wall (The Movie)
1982
3.65 | 175 ratings
In Concert - Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1989
3.02 | 56 ratings
La Carrera Panamericana
1992
4.44 | 527 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
3.11 | 92 ratings
London - Live 66-67
1999
4.58 | 635 ratings
Live At Pompeii (The Director's Cut)
2003
4.08 | 178 ratings
Classic Albums: The Dark Side Of The Moon
2003
2.94 | 55 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd
2003
3.30 | 67 ratings
The Pink Floyd & Syd Barrett Story
2003
2.41 | 32 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd Volume 2 - A Critical Review 1975 - 1996
2005
2.27 | 17 ratings
The Ultimate Review
2005
2.00 | 20 ratings
The World's Greatest Albums - Atom Heart Mother
2005
2.51 | 21 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here
2005
1.97 | 20 ratings
Reflections And Echoes
2006
2.73 | 21 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's The Piper At The Gates of Dawn
2006
1.36 | 22 ratings
Rock Milestones: Ummagumma
2006
2.09 | 14 ratings
Music Box Biographical Collection
2006
2.32 | 19 ratings
The Dark Side - Interviews
2006
2.17 | 15 ratings
Total Rock Review
2006
2.46 | 18 ratings
Meddle: A Classic Album Under Review
2007
3.11 | 18 ratings
Retrospectives
2007
2.00 | 14 ratings
The Early Pink Floyd - A Review And Critique
2008
2.22 | 14 ratings
Comfortably Numb
2008
3.00 | 20 ratings
A Technicolor Dream
2008
3.57 | 27 ratings
Live Anthology
2008
1.85 | 19 ratings
The Great Gig In The Sky: The Album By Album Guide
2008
3.96 | 84 ratings
The Story of Wish You Were Here
2012

PINK FLOYD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.16 | 38 ratings
The Best Of The Pink Floyd
1970
3.58 | 362 ratings
Relics
1971
3.23 | 118 ratings
A Nice Pair
1973
2.70 | 62 ratings
Masters Of Rock Vol. 1
1974
2.20 | 203 ratings
A Collection Of Great Dance Songs
1981
2.20 | 147 ratings
Works
1983
0.00 | 0 ratings
Hits
1983
3.49 | 94 ratings
Shine On
1992
3.71 | 110 ratings
The Early Singles
1992
4.60 | 10 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon (Twentieth Anniversary Edition)
1993
3.10 | 72 ratings
1967: The First Three Singles
1997
3.44 | 253 ratings
Echoes - The Best Of Pink Floyd
2001
4.06 | 84 ratings
Oh By The Way...
2007
2.83 | 59 ratings
A Foot In The Door: The Best Of Pink Floyd
2011
4.42 | 75 ratings
Discovery
2011
4.72 | 135 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon - Experience Edition
2011
4.59 | 129 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon - Immersion Edition
2011
4.71 | 148 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Experience Edition
2011
4.46 | 117 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Immersion Edition
2011
4.28 | 85 ratings
The Wall - Experience Edition
2011
1.95 | 59 ratings
The Wall Singles
2011
3.80 | 98 ratings
The Wall - Immersion Edition
2012
4.22 | 45 ratings
The Division Bell (20th Anniversary Deluxe Box)
2014
3.81 | 51 ratings
The Early Years 1967-1972 Creation
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Early Years Continu/ation 1967-1974 Sessions
2016
4.86 | 2 ratings
The Early Years 1965-1967 Cambridge St/ation
2017
3.90 | 2 ratings
The Early Years 1968 Germin/Ation
2017
2.00 | 1 ratings
The Early Years 1969 Dramatis/ation
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Early Years 1970 Devi/ation
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Early Years 1971 Reverber/ation
2017
0.00 | 0 ratings
The Early Years 1972 Obfusc/ation
2017
3.59 | 8 ratings
The Later Years 1987 - 2019
2019

PINK FLOYD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.57 | 82 ratings
Arnold Layne
1967
3.31 | 93 ratings
See Emily Play
1967
2.80 | 58 ratings
Apples And Oranges
1967
2.63 | 64 ratings
Tonite Let's All Make Love In London
1967
3.61 | 28 ratings
Flaming
1967
3.35 | 42 ratings
It Would Be So Nice
1968
3.70 | 42 ratings
Point Me at the Sky
1968
2.88 | 40 ratings
The Nile Song
1969
3.84 | 75 ratings
One Of These Days
1971
4.29 | 15 ratings
Free Four
1972
4.33 | 9 ratings
Free Four / Absolutely Curtains
1972
3.80 | 88 ratings
Money
1973
3.60 | 78 ratings
Time
1973
3.66 | 70 ratings
Have a Cigar
1975
5.00 | 1 ratings
Pigs on the Wing / Sheep
1977
4.50 | 2 ratings
Pigs (Three Different Ones)
1977
3.83 | 73 ratings
Comfortably Numb
1979
3.64 | 78 ratings
Another Brick In The Wall
1979
3.43 | 62 ratings
Run Like Hell
1980
3.25 | 55 ratings
When the Tigers Broke Free
1982
1.95 | 52 ratings
Not Now John/The Hero's Return (Part 2)
1983
2.52 | 62 ratings
Learning To Fly (promo single)
1987
3.07 | 53 ratings
On the Turning Away
1987
2.98 | 36 ratings
One Slip
1988
2.95 | 19 ratings
A Momentary Lapse Of Reason Official Tour CD
1988
2.90 | 23 ratings
Shine On - Selections From The Box
1992
3.22 | 72 ratings
High Hopes/ Keep Talking (single)
1994
3.39 | 60 ratings
Take It Back
1994
3.63 | 8 ratings
Interview Disc
1995
4.13 | 46 ratings
Louder Than Words
2014
2.78 | 18 ratings
Pink Floyd 1965 - Their First Recordings
2015

PINK FLOYD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Early Years 1968 Germin/Ation by PINK FLOYD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2017
3.90 | 2 ratings

BUY
The Early Years 1968 Germin/Ation
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

4 stars Introduction

1968 was an eventful time for Pink Floyd, but not in actual music as much as the band's first shake-up. Of course, we see Roger, Richard and Nick wanting to record another album and continue with the development of the band, but Syd has become less and less reliable and having some definite mental issues, so, with the desire to push on, they bring in David Gilmour to take his place. However, there were still some residual Syd music still out there, so they kept a spot open for him and included one of his songs on their new album 'A Saucerful of Secrets'.

Without Syd in the line-up, the band's sound moved to an even more psychedelic and experimental sound, and turned away from the more poppy sound that Syd was leaning towards. Gilmour took over the lead singing and lead guitar roles, yet also allowed for the other members to take the lead role from time to time. The bump in the band line-up showed up in the lesser amount of output in the band at the time.

This probably leads to the fact that there just isn't as much rare and unreleased material for this time period, which the second box set in The Early Years series proves with only one CD with 13 tracks, and one DVD/Blu-ray disc. However, there is still a good amount of paraphernalia included in the set and also the excellent book that comes with it. 'Volume 2: 1968: Germin/ation' includes some non-album studio recordings and some BBC Radio Sessions that were recorded in 1968 on the CD, most of which were previously unreleased. The video portion of the set features 26 tracks that cover the band's appearances on various TV shows and documentaries performing songs from mostly the 2nd album, but also some from the 1st, and a few short interviews.

The CD

The CD begins with the 4 tracks taken from the two non-album singles released in 1968. 'Point Me at the Sky' features Gilmour on lead with Waters joining on the chorus. It was actually the last of the two singles to be released, and since it was a failure on the charts, the band decided to stop releasing singles and concentrate on albums. 'It Would Be So Nice' was the other A-side of the two singles. The band thought these singles were a bit sub-par and felt they better expressed themselves on albums. The songs are a bit more complex than the Barrett-era single, but the radio audience was just not ready for them. The B-side to 'It Would Be So Nice' follows; 'Julia's Dream', which was the first song recorded with Gilmour at vocals. It is also currently the better known of the 4 single tracks on this collection. The B-side for 'Point Me at the Sky' ends this section of the CD: 'Careful with That Axe, Eugene' in its edited single version which has been remastered on this collection. This is the only instrumental of the four, and is also quite well-known nowadays, but rather obscure when it first came out. This track is the most psychedelic, and probably the most like the sound that the band was moving towards. Of course, the song is most famous for Roger Water's screaming. These four tracks are all available on several different collections.

The rest of the tracks on the CD are previously unreleased. The next two tracks are from a session at Capitol Studios in Los Angeles, recorded on August 22, 1968. These tracks were fairly recently discovered and in them you can hear early traces of the main theme from 'Atom Heart Mother' and 'Cymbaline'. 'Song 1' sees a 'mellowing' of the bands sound as it is not harsh and sharp as previous instrumentals, and it meanders along nicely, but gets more abrasive towards the end when Gilmour's heavier guitar comes in. 'Song 2 (Roger's Boogie)' begins with the band harmonizing vocally, then features some lyrics and also wordless vocalizations. Again, the sound is quite mellow, but the vocals are definitely unpolished, the lead sung by Roger. Even though the title hints to an upbeat track with 'Boogie', there is no boogie involved here as it is slow with some of Mason's nice organ work. Even though it all sounds unfinished, it's still enjoyable, and a bit surprising that it is not that psychedelic or experimental sounding. The sound quality is stellar.

The next four tracks are from a BBC radio session recorded on June 25, 1968. The program that these renditions were broadcast on is here with all of announcer John Peel's comments beginning with 'Murderotic Woman' which is actually just 'Careful with That Axe, Eugene' in a much briefer version and no screams. Again, the sound is superb. This is followed by more talking by Peel and another instrumental here called 'The Massed Gadgets of Hercules', which is an early and more condensed version of 'A Saucerful of Secrets' but again condensed, less structured, definitely psychedelic. 'Let There Be More Light' follows with a mostly faithful rendition, but with enough of a difference to be interesting including a much more interesting guitar solo than the original, thanks to Gilmour, and this is followed by 'Julia Dream', again with a better mixing of the acoustic guitar. All of these recordings are quite well restored and act as a great supplement to the 'A Saucerful of Secrets' album.

The last three tracks are from yet another BBC radio session, this time recorded for broadcast on December 2, 1968. This time, Peel's comments are not included. This set begins with 'Point Me At the Sky', but the sound effects don't translate so well on this version as they do on the original single, but its not a major issue. What was quite a rarity at the time follows in 'Embryo' which was a non-album track, neither was it a single. It was originally released on a hard to find Various Artist collection called 'Picnic', but which was also included a few years later on the PF collection 'Works'. This is not a song you hear very often in the PF catalog, so it is a nice surprise to this box set. The song is very cleaned up compared to the original, and it sounds really good, almost pastoral with Wright's signature organ sound and Gilmour's vocals and acoustic guitar standing out. The last track on the album is the BBC version of 'Interstellar Overdrive' in its full glory. It is always a good thing to hear new versions of this track as, since it's mostly improvised, it takes on a new life each time. And it really becomes a new song this time, probably one of the better versions of it that I have heard, still strange and noisy, but better than ever.

So, for the CD portion of this volume, there are ample reasons why this one is a worthwhile collection for the PF aficionado and plenty to be excited about. Most of the tracks are not officially available anywhere else and the restoration of the tracks is once again quite amazing. If you already have the first four tracks on another collection, the advantage of this one is that the sound is consistent and top notch. The other previously unavailable tracks speak for themselves.

DVD/Blu-ray

The video discs start off with mimed performances from the 'new' version of the band. The problem is, they are singing the songs they recorded with Barrett, so the miming is definitely off, but it gets to the point that the band just has fun with it, singing off cue and pulling faces. The videos are not performances, but are actually 'music videos' done for the TV show from Brussels known as 'Tienerklanken' and have a recording date of February 18-19 in 1968. The videos are, as usual, quite pristine, all in black and white and have 7 performances; namely 'Astronomy Domine', 'The Scarecrow', 'Corporal Clegg', 'Paintbox', 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun', 'See Emily Play', and 'Bike'. The last one is actually a photo montage while the others are action videos shot in studio and outside, and you can see people watching the boys mess around on the fringes. Even though these are mimed, the videos are quite entertaining and fun to watch, and you get the feeling that they didn't always take things that seriously, but actually seem relaxed and carefree. There is one more video following this done similarly but for the Brussels TV show 'Vibrato' for 'Apples and Oranges', again with Gilmour instead of Barrett.

Finally we get to some un-mimed material as the next 4 tracks come from a French TV show 'Bouton Rouge' recorded on February 20. The music is live and you can feel the energy in the band for these tracks (plus they are in color), and Nick Mason is on fire! His performance is quite animated and excellent here. We get to hear Gilmour sing lead parts in place of Barrett for 'Astronomy Domine' (along with Wright and in a more abbreviated version from the original) and 'Flaming' and he does quite well. 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' is then sung by Waters followed by an electrifying performance of 'Let There Be More Light' with Gilmour and Wright singing. The performances aren't perfect, but the band keeps it together quite well.

After this, there are a series of performances at various venues. There is 'Paintbox' from performed for 'Discorama' with Rick singing and the band playing with psychedelic effects superimposed over them. A short 'Instrumental Improvisation' follows which has the band playing for a documentary called 'The Sound of Change' in recorded in March. These are mostly quick scenes of riot, people and the band playing. An abbreviated version of 'Set the Controls'.' is played for 'All My Loving'. The band is in the balcony of a theater and most of it is filmed with a sepia filter to give it a psychedelic look. Another incomplete version follows, this time of 'It Would Be So Nice'. The video is quite pristine and in color on this one, but it is not a complete performance. It was shot in Rome for 'Rome Goes Pop'. Staying in Rome, we get a performance from 'Pop '68' filmed in May. This one is mostly a improvisational performance based around 'Interstellar Overdrive', but the riff for it only comes in at the end. For some reason, we don't see much of Gilmour in the video which is a shame, but we do see Waters messing around with the knobs on his bass and plenty of Mason and Wright, but Gilmour is strangely absent from the video, though you can definitely hear him. The video is well done, but unfortunately superimposes psychedelic images over that band for a good part of the 7 minute video. The ending is also quite loud.

Next, it's back to Belgium for 'Tienerklanken ' Kastival' for a performance of 'Astronomy Domine' on August 31. There is a short interview with Waters as the video begins. Again the video is pristine, but the sound is a bit distorted as it doesn't seem that the sound system wasn't able to handle the audio in the recording. The video centers mostly around Waters who does the vocals this time, and Mason. It is also heavily edited and the cuts are quite obvious. There is another short interview with Waters on the next track at the same venue as he explains that he doesn't like the acoustics there. From there, it's on to Paris, France for TV show 'Samedi et Compagnie' filmed on September 6. Here we see a much hairier Wright sharing lead vocals with Gilmour. The host speaks from the audience to introduce the band and they play the song, but fade out early when it is apparent the audience can't keep time with their clapping along. The 2nd track from the same venue is 'Remember a Day' sung by Rick, but we can't see him at all, and the rest of the band is having fun miming the song and obviously not even sticking close to the audio. Funny.

This is followed by a quick video for 'A L'Affiche du Monde' in London. It's in black and white and it shows the band running down stairs, getting on a subway and then running up a down escalator while the first half of 'Let There Be More Light' plays. You get to see the band lip-synch on the train while disinterested passengers look on. Next are two tracks from 'Tous en Scene' in Paris on October 21. The first is 'Let There Be More Light' performed after the host announces the band. Wright seems to be woefully absent and Waters and Gilmour sing the lead. The auditorium seems quite packed. The sound is a bit iffy and so is the performance. They then perform 'Flaming'. This time you can see more Wright, but mostly from the back as the camera set up is terrible and so is the sound system. The band tries their best though as Gilmour takes on the vocals.

Yet another version of 'Let There Be Light' follows, this time not lip-synched, but actually live for yet another French TV show 'Surprise Partie' on November 1. This is also a fuller version lasting almost 7 minutes with a great Gilmour solo and lots of hipster dancers who are all probably in their 70s now. Last of all, we get a restored promo video for 'Point Me At the Sky'. In this one you get to see the band supposedly flying in an airplane or doing other things.

What's Missing?

The CD and DVD/Blu-ray is the exact same as what's in the complete box set. The thing that is missing here is the same as Volume 1, the early singles in their 7' vinyl form, specifically for this set that would be both 'Point Me at the Sky/Careful with That Axe, Eugene' and 'It Would Be So Nice/Julia Dream', but at least they do appear on the CD. Also, since Volume 7 is so hard to get, the track 'Baby Blue Shuffle in D Major' which was recorded at a BBC radio session on December 2, 1968 is included on that volume, thus missing from this collection.

In Conclusion

So, in this box set, you get one excellent CD with a good amount of unreleased material and all in top quality recordings. However, it is only one CD, so the DVD/Blu-ray tries to make up for it by having a lot of tracks. The problem is, the quality isn't consistently great like it was for Volume 1. Though there is a lot of good stuff there, it is also filled with some unnecessary things and 'Let There Be More Light' is on there 5 times. I guess the video output wasn't as varied and as good during this time, but, again, there are some great clips there anyway. This ends up giving the overall collection 4 stars as the video discs don't quite make up for the lesser amount of music.

 The Early Years 1965-1967 Cambridge St/ation by PINK FLOYD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2017
4.86 | 2 ratings

BUY
The Early Years 1965-1967 Cambridge St/ation
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TCat
Collaborator Eclectic Team

5 stars Introduction

In 2016, Pink Floyd released a box set called 'The Early Years 1965 - 1972' which was quite a comprehensive set of rare, unreleased and live recordings made through those formative years of the band. This humongous box set contained 33 discs divided up into seven volumes, each volume with the appropriate CDs, DVDs and Blu-rays, each volume focusing on specific years. This full box set can cost around $500, and some people might not be able to part with all that money all at once, so what I hope to do is take these volumes separately for those that would rather focus on more specific sections of the PF history than the entire thing. One item that is missing by buying the volumes separately is the 7th volume, which is available by itself in Japan, but only with the CD, not the 2 DVDs/Blu-rays that come with that volume. The other items that are missing will be noted at the end of each review of the volume it would pertain to. The 7th volume didn't pertain to one specific time period, however, but sort of cleaned up some of the missing bits and pieces that didn't fit in the separate volumes.

For those not wanting to get this huge box set, each volume was later sold separately, being released in 2017. For the most part, the volumes remain intact. It is probably better to look at each volume instead of writing a very long review about the entire set, so I will review each volume as it was sold separately in 2017.

This review is for 'The Early Years Volume 1: 1965-1967: Cambridge St/ation'. This set is made up of 2 CDs, and a DVD/Blu-ray disc. Disc 1 covers studio recordings that were made during the years covered in this volume. Disc 2 contains 8 tracks from a show recorded in Stockholm in 1967 and 9 tracks recorded in studio called the John Latham studio recordings from 1967.

CD 1

The first 6 tracks on this disc were previously ultra-rare tracks recorded by the band before they were known as Pink Floyd. Their working name back then was 'The Tea Set' and these songs were all recorded around December of 1964. Before they were released as a double 7' single set a few years before, they were only a rumor. They were made available in limited quantities at that time, and now they are also available on this set. All of them are recorded in mono.

'The Tea Set' was comprised of Syd Barrett on lead vocals and guitars, Roger Waters on bass, backing and lead vocals (in one case), Richard Wright on keyboards, Nick Mason on drums and percussion, and Bob Klose on guitars. The first three songs were part of the first 7' single and were all written and sung by Barrett. 'Lucy Leave', 'Double O Bo' and 'Remember Me' were all quite basic sounds reminiscent of the sound of the day, nothing much was psychedelic or original about them, however, they are some great rockers, all of them just under 3 minutes each, and 'Remember Me' has that sarcastic Barrett sound with vocals just a touch over-the-top. The 2nd 7' single contained the next 3 tracks; 'Walk With Me Sydney' (sung by Richard's first wife Juliette Gale and Barrett together with Roger singing on the bridge) written by Roger, 'Butterfly' written by Barrett and 'I'm a King Bee', a cover of Slim Harpo that retains the bluesy sound. All of these 6 songs are well recorded and sound great in mono. All of them also have that false naivet' that was apparent in the Barrett's later PF compositions, but to a lesser level. Lovers Syd's PF will enjoy these discoveries.

The next part of the first disc contains some more familiar PF songs from 1966-67, mostly songs that were singles but were not included on the albums. Since then, however, they have been available on countless other compilations. In the case of this box set, they are all included with their cleaned up 2010 mixes. The first 5 of these tracks are in mono. 'Arnold Layne', 'See Emily Play' and 'Apples and Oranges' were previously released with these 2010 mixes on 'An Introduction to Syd Barrett'. The mixes bring out all of the sounds and restores them to their original glory. They all sound quite pristine. After this are 'Candy and a Currant Bun' and 'Paintbox', one of the rare examples of Richard singing lead vocals. After this point, the rest of the tracks on this first disc are in stereo, but still in the 2010 mixes. 'Matilda Mother' appears in the alternate version that appeared on 'An Introduction to Syd Barrett' except this time it is slightly extended. The remaining tracks are all previously unreleased, again all in 2010 mixes to retain a constant sound. 'Jugband Blues' comes from the band's second album 'A Saucerful of Secrets'. Next is the rare track 'In the Beechwoods'. This track was considered to be a lost track recorded in 1966 along with two other unavailable songs. There are no vocals on this track, and it sounds like a backing track to what would have been what sounds like a great song if it had been finished. 'Vegetable Man' was one of those bootlegged tracks that made the rounds and ended up becoming a well know track, but this set is the first time it was officially released by the band. It was originally intended to be a follow up single to 'See Emily Play', but ended up getting shelved. The song was going to be included on a Barrett rarities collection along with the last track 'Scream Thy Last Scream', but the band blocked that. Both of these tracks are more progressive oriented in that they contain a lot of tempo shifts and non-standard structures.

This CD of rare and unreleased early gems have high quality sound and is quite a valuable collection of tracks for those that love early Pink Floyd. Even if nothing else in this first volume was worthwhile, this disc would be worth the price of admission all on its own. PF's early years were the years that took me the longest to get interested in, but now that I am, I can't get enough of it, and this disc is like a major treat.

CD 2

The second CD takes on more of the lengthy, psychedelic and experimental tracks that were being played by the band at the time. The first 8 tracks are taken from a concert at Gyllenne Cirkeln in Stockholm, Sweden, recorded on September 10, 1967. The recording is somewhat low in quality, but is still listenable. It starts with a short track where the band was introduced to what sounds like a small crowd and goes quickly into a psychedelic instrumental called 'Reaction in G'. Sometimes this piece has lyrics, but not in this case. It starts as a moderate piece with the repeating bass riff surrounded by loud guitars and keys, then the tempo speeds up and slows interchangeably as the instruments make improvised noise around it. Even though the next track is 'Matilda Mother', don't expect many vocals anytime during this concert. The chords from the guitars make it easy to hear the melody in your head, and as it continues, the wailing organ and guitars help you keep track of where you are at in the song. At one point you can hear singing, but its very subdued. A long, exploratory and experimental 'Pow R Toc H.' follows and goes into a 12 minute trip of psychedelia with the kooky, vocal sound effects at the beginning. This low-fi sound continues with 'Scream Thy Last Scream', 'Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun' (where you can hear more vocals but they are subdued, but since the original's vocals were subdued anyway, it is very recognizable), 'See Emily Play' and 'Interstellar Overdrive'. Not the best recording or concert in the world, but it does show a window that we can travel back in time through to hear the band jam in its infancy.

The 2nd half of the CD is made up of tracks entitled 'John Latham Version 1' through '9'. John Latham was an artist and these tracks are all improvisations that range from 2:37 to 5:06, so nothing really too long. The tracks were recorded at De Land Lea Studios in London on October 20, 1967. They are somewhat similar to the extended improvisation from the middle section of 'Interstellar Overdrive'. The recording quality is much better on these tracks and the sound is very free form and experimental. The tracks all flow together so its not easy to tell when one starts and another ends, as the performance is really just one single improvisational session broken up into 9 tracks.

This 2nd CD is not going to appeal to many listeners as it is the band at their most improvisational. The songs that most will recognize are mostly instrumental and the sound quality is sub-par, but the John Latham Versions are of a better quality, so if you love the psychedelic and experimental sound, then this disc will be of some value to you. Most likely though, the die hard fans will probably be the only ones interested in this one.

DVD/Blu-ray

The DVD and Blu-ray discs have identical track lists which range from rare promo videos, performances and interviews. It starts with the video promo for 'Chapter 24' that originally was on 'Piper at the Gates of Dawn' album. The song is in the same form as on the album and the video is of members of the band having a romp in the country and then in the city with some uncomfortable facial close-ups. After this is a more interesting video of the band messing around with their instruments in order to create the psychedelic sounds of 'Nick's Boogie' while an excerpt of it plays for the audio. The first part shows them in studio and this later switches to a live setting with people trying to dance. The next video is taken from Granada TV and a short documentary about the Underground Scene where Pink Floyd plays an edited 'Interstellar Overdrive' while a narrator talks about the psychedelic scene in London. The video is in black and white but fairly cleaned up, quite intriguing and even a bit funny as you watch people explore this art movement.

This is followed by the promo music video for 'Arnold Layne', a nice black and white video that is artfully done with the band on the beach with a mannequin. The style actually seems well produced that it could have easily fit with the videos of later times. The next video is from a program called 'The Look of the Week' which is hosted by a chap named Hans Keller. It starts off with the strange vocal shinanegans of 'Pow R Toc H.', but only plays a short snippet from that before Hans talks to his audience about how the music always has to be too loud for his taste. After he chats to the TV, the band plays through a shortened version of 'Astronomy Domine' featuring Syd playing up the part. After they finish, Hans interviews Syd and Roger. The video is in black and white and is quite cleaned up. The interview gets into why the music is so loud and does a great job of showing the widening of the generational 'gap' of the time. It's an excellent insight into the band, Syd and Roger.

Next there are a couple of their promo videos. The first is 'The Scarecrow' which sees the band in the country again, this time messing around with a scarecrow as the familiar version of the song plays. It is introduced by a narrator in the beginning. 'Jugband Blues'. This one at first shows Syd standing and staring into the camera as he plays and sings the song, the band comes in later, playing the brass instruments and then everything turns psychedelic. Both of these videos are in color. They appear on 'American Bandstand' next with a black and white video of them lip-synching the strange 'Apples and Oranges' while Syd stands there looking quite sad for being there. Dick Clark comes out and does a quick interview about British and American food and each member politely answers his dumb questions.

Next is a piece of a documentary called 'Tomorrow's World' where the narrator explains new techniques (at the time) of mixing light and sound. They show how they make psychedelic patterns while Pink Floyd does a short instrumental improvisation. The camera flips back and forth from the band to the psychedelic light patterns and a Siamese cat. Another B&W video of a German documentary called 'Die Jungen Nachtwandler' features Pink Floyd playing the improvised portion of 'Interstellar Overdrive' while showing shots of the audience listening and dancing crazily. The narrator speaks in German and then titles roll.

There is a video in black and white of the band performing 'See Emily Play' on the show 'Top of the Pops'. The audio is pretty much the same as the recorded version, so it's probably all lip synched, though you can see Syd breaking out in a sweat. We see more of the band playing around with a scarecrow for 'The Scarecrow (Outtakes)' which again features the same version of 'The Scarecrow' but this time with additional color shots that were not used in the finished promo video. This is all rounded off with a full (finally) performance of 'Interstellar Overdrive'. The problem is, instead of being a concert performance like I hoped, it's a poorly done psychedelic film with the studio version of the track playing through it and a German recitation of a Timothy Leary poem. Oh well, at least the other video snippets are pretty good.

What's Missing?

The only applicable thing that is missing from this set that is available in the complete box set are the 3 replica vinyl singles: 'Arnold Layne'/'Candy and a Currant Bun', 'Point Me at the Sky'/'Careful with That Axe, Eugene', and 'It Would Be so Nice'/'Julia Dream'. This is something, as a vinyl collector, that I would have loved to have, but it isn't a necessity unless you have the money to pay for the full box set.

In Summary

This is a pretty good collection of some of the rare tracks, many of which were not officially or readily available in one collection before the release of this volume. The first CD is quite a valuable disc as far as bringing the early, non-album tracks together, and the quality of the recordings is excellent. This disc alone will be worth it for most Pink Floyd lovers. The 2nd disc is a bit more iffy. Even though the songs in the Stockholm part of the disc are mostly instrumental, it would have been nice if the vocals that are there were more audible. The sound isn't great, but its also not terrible. The long improvisational section is all previously unreleased, but will probably only appeal to the fans that have to have everything. I found them interesting for about the first 10 minutes, after that it seemed to go on too long, but I may grow to like them over time. The DVD/Blu-ray features are excellent, except for maybe the last track which was not what I hoped for, but the interviews, videos and performances are excellent windows into the band and the lifestyle of the psychedelic underground of the time. Disc 1 is 5 stars, disc 2 is 3 stars, DVD/Blu-Ray is 4 stars. Add to this the value of this set being worth what you will pay for it, and also figure in the convenience of not having to pay over $500 for the combined box set which might have material that you don't care for, the fact that this focuses on one important stage in the band and their development, this is a definite must have for Pink Floyd fans and it should be attractive to casual fans also, especially if you want more of the early stuff. 5 stars.

 The Later Years 1987 - 2019 by PINK FLOYD album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
3.59 | 8 ratings

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The Later Years 1987 - 2019
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by jude111

3 stars I was nearly out of my teens and a huge Floyd fan when the band re-constituted, and I was over the moon about it. I enjoyed A Momentary Lapse of Reason immensely, while recognizing that the band was not quite what they used to be. The album was too slick and 80s sounding, but I did enjoy a few tracks - One Slip and Dogs of War in particular. A few years later, the live album Delicate Sound of Thunder came out, and it was my dream come true: Finally, a live Floyd album! I had just taken up jogging, and I always associate those running days with that live album, since it was all I listened to when I ran.

So I was curious about this new release. They've "remixed" Momentary Lapse, and included new songs previously left off Delicate Sound of Thunder. The remixed album (live drums now, and Wright's keyboard have been restored) is interesting, but in my opinion the original version is still the definitive versions. Some things have been added (Wright's keys), some are gone (e.g. Gilmour's "awww"s on Dogs of War during the sax solo).

The biggest selling point for me is the restored tracks on the live album, especially Welcome to the Machine and One Slip. I was blown away by the live version of Welcome to the Machine in particular. It's so lively, and such an interesting take on the classic, that's it's shocking the band left it off the original release. The only thing that saddens me is that the 20 year old me missed out on it, back when I thought they were the greatest band on the planet. (Now if we could only get an official live version of Poles Apart added to Pulse in the future...)

On the other hand, the live album too has been "remixed." Not only is the mix much different from the original Delicate Sound of Thunder album, but I believe that originally the band had "improved" the tracks by working on them in the studio. But now it seems they've undone that. Again, I prefer the original "improved" mixes. I noticed the biggest difference with Comfortably Numb, especially in the vocal sections that Waters used to sing. I much prefer the original DSoT version. The changes are such that it's practically a different live album now, which isn't a bad thing...

 Animals by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.52 | 3610 ratings

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Animals
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

4 stars After the masterpiece "Wish You Were Here", full of slow ballads where the keyboards and synths played by Wright occupy the scene, comes Animals, a concept album based on the book Animal's Farm by George Orwell.

1. Pigs On The Wing Part 1 (1:25) is an acoustic intro, a lost chance because the melody is good but the song is too short.

2. Dogs (17:04) is considered the album's masterpiece, it's a 17-minute suite, which begins with rhythmic acoustic guitar, gritty Waters' voice, and keyboard carpet. Around 3'45'' comes a Gilmour riff which became very famous. Overall, the suite is a dilated song, based on drums, acoustic and electric guitar support and voice, sober as arrangements, more rock than the previous PF songs, with Gilmour's solo guitar in evidence. After 8 minutes the suite is finished, in fact we go back to the initial carpet of keyboards, time stops, static music is dilated in a rather long-winded and not very significant way. Then the same initial sequence starts again: acoustic guitars, vocals, drums, electric guitar solo. It doesn't seem to me like a great masterpiece. It is a song that has lost all progressive and psychedelic thrust, and that has more than anything else the grit of rock in Waters' voice and in Gilmour's solo. A song that is better when it is played live. Rating 8.

End of side A.

3. Pigs (Three Different Ones) (11:28) The song has an excellent beginning, bass and keyboards, vaguely psychedelic, then the rhythm begins with the singing. We are facing another rock ballad conducted by drums, vocals, electric guitar. Then there is a wonderful, obsessive long instrumental passage, with acid sounds, then another time the vocals by Waters, and the final solo by Gilmour. Rating 8,5.

4. Sheep (10:16) Sheep is a 10-minute mini suite that starts slowly, with a piece of keyboards and bass of almost two minutes that is not very useful, then the rock rhythm singing begins, which we have already heard in the two previous songs, but faster. Then there are some nice instrumental passages between keyboards and bass by Waters, in evidence. In the end, the rhythmic music starts again. In this song, the sung part and the instrumental part are not well integrated. Rating 7.5 / 8.

5. Pigs On The Wing Part 2 (1:25) is another useless musical piece.

With "Animals", Pink Floyd became the group of Roger Waters. He is the singer-songwriter who leads the group to develop a politically committed rock music album, with three long, dilated songs that have little to do with progressive and psychedelia. They are conventional rock songs in terms of structure and arrangement, without significant changes in rhythm and style, very homogeneous. Only in some instrumental situations there are art-rock passages (in addition to the sounds of animals). "Animals" is therefore the transition album to the third phase of Pink Floyd: The first is the psychedelic one, which goes from 1967 to 1970. The second is the progressive one, which starts with "Atom Heart Mother" and ends with "Wish You Were" (1975), where the songs are very dilated but also very accurate for arrangement and where the Wright's keabords are in evidence.

With Animals begins the third phase, that of "auteur rock", where Roger Waters is the boss of the group, where the lyrics matter more than the music. Here in Animals, to be honest, the music prevails over the lyrics and the songs are still long, similar to "Wish You Were Here", but more sober as an arrangement, with Wright's work on the background, and from the following "The Wall" the songs will become medium length, if not short, and the background music will be classic rock with orchestral and sometimes experimental arrangements. The golden age of progressive PF is over but Waters will be able to churn out two excellent albums as a singer-songwriter accompanied by the rest of the group.

Total Time: 41:38

Side A: 8, Side B: 8+.

Rating Album: 8,5. Four Stars.

 Apples And Oranges by PINK FLOYD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1967
2.80 | 58 ratings

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Apples And Oranges
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars "Apples and Oranges" / "Paint Box" was Pink Floyd's last release while singer-guitarist Syd Barrett was with the band (though he did appear on a few tracks on the group's 1968 album A Saucerful of Secrets).

One side of each of Pink Floyd's first three non-album singles is about a girl, and here it's "Apples and Oranges," an opposites-attract ditty in the psychedelic-pop tradition of celebrating the mundane. "Apples and Oranges" borrows some chord changes from the group's "Arnold Layne," but it lacks that song's inventiveness. Barrett nearly sounds bored in places ("she's on time again"), while in others (i.e., "I catch her by the eye, then I stop and have a think?") he sounds like he's aping the Monkees - - although one imagines a nod-and-wink sort of aping. The song is, of course, inane, and it seems that Barrett might've been at the point where he felt the whole business of making these records was inane. Indeed, within a month of this single's release in November 1967, Barrett's replacement, David Gilmour, was hired, and Barrett was out by the end of January.

Accordingly, as it seems, the b-side, "Paint Box" was the first song on a Pink Floyd single not to be written by Barrett; here pianist Richard Wright is the composer and lead vocalist. It's not terrible as a b-side, but it must've been clear that Barrett would be difficult to replace as a writer. Apparently the group originally hoped to retain Barrett as a non-performing songwriter, but his mental health continued to deteriorate. Prior to "Paint Box," the group had released fourteen songs on singles and LPs - - one written by bassist Roger Waters, two instrumentals credited to the whole band, and the remaining eleven written by Barrett. "Paint Box," recorded in a day, is wispy from a compositional standpoint, but in my opinion Wright handles the vocals well, and drummer Nick Mason is able to show off a bit on the tom-toms.

"Apples and Oranges" / "Paint Box" is a pretty pedestrian single, and sadly, not the best send-off for Syd Barrett, who may not have completely understood or accepted his dismissal; he occasionally showed up at the group's shows and recording sessions through 1970, during which time he made two solo records with substantial help from Waters, Gilmour, and Wright. He quit music for good in 1974. Meanwhile, Pink Floyd, decoupled from Barrett's songwriting, but also from his exasperating antics, embarked on its five-year journey to international rock stardom. [2 stars on the 4-star scale for singles - - see review page for scale]

 See Emily Play by PINK FLOYD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1967
3.31 | 93 ratings

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See Emily Play
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars Although "See Emily Play" appeared on the US release of Pink Floyd's debut album, fans nonetheless consider it a non-album single. "The Scarecrow," meanwhile, appeared on all editions of The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, released about two months after this single.

After a sci-fi laser effect noise and a drum fill, "See Emily Play" opens with an organ solo right out of The Doors before moving into a surprisingly poppy groove. A spacey, almost acidic guitar-and-organ freakout begins around 1:30, and the verse-refrain structure returns half a minute later, but not before clearly telegraphing that this was more like Jefferson Airplane than, say, Tommy James. Most likely, these guys weren't going to show up on Top of the Pops in suits and ties.

It's all a bit different on the relatively calm and pastoral b-side. A number of interpretations have been advanced for "The Scarecrow," whose twelve lines are organized into three stanzas, each ending with "he stood in a field where barley grows." It could certainly be taken at face value: a straightforward tune about a "black and green scarecrow ? resigned to his fate." Kind of heartbreaking, actually, and no cheerier than the a-side, whose titular character seems to be descending into mental illness. Of course, my interpretation is informed by the understanding that singer-guitarist Barrett was experiencing the same. Although Emily might be simply be a Manic Pixie Dream Girl, she could just as easily be Ophelia: "Put on a gown that touches the ground / float on a river forever and ever."

It's not surprising that the catchy "See Emily Play" fared better than the group's UK first single, "Arnold Layne," or even that it was Pink Floyd's biggest (and, incidentally, last) British hit until "Another Brick in the Wall (Part II)" in 1979. "See Emily Play" / "The Scarecrow" is a nice, albeit weird, slice of British psychedelia. [2 stars on the 4-star scale for singles - - see review page for scale]

 Arnold Layne by PINK FLOYD album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1967
3.57 | 82 ratings

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Arnold Layne
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

2 stars "Arnold Layne" / "Candy and a Currant Bun" is the first of three non-album singles Pink Floyd released prior to the addition of David Gilmour and the departure of Syd Barrett. "Arnold Layne" is one of the better of these six sides, later collected on 1967: The First Three Singles.

Arnold is a cross-dresser who steals garments from clotheslines, discovering while wearing the purloined articles that "it's not the same / it takes two to know." Going unanswered are such questions as The same as what? and What does it take two to know? At the end of the song Barrett implores, "Arnold Layne, don't do it again!" It's not clear what the takeaway is, or whether there is one. This is almost as close as the band got to radio-friendly psychedelic pop;* it's said that Barrett, who wrote and sang both sides of this single, developed a distaste for commercialism during this period, but that's not evident here in the melody or the production of "Arnold Layne." In fact, the song borders on sunshine pop; I can picture the two-measure "why can't you see" part being repeated three or four times to good effect. Of course, the subject matter may have reduced the song's chart prospects while likely increasing interest among the group's target audience.

A detached Barrett delivers "Arnold Layne" in the same way he sings "Astronomy Domine," despite the fact that only the latter arguably calls for detachment. (And come to think of it, the descending chords underlying the verses of "Arnold Layne" - - i.e., as he sings "on the wall hung a tall mirror / distorted view?" - - is very similar to those on "Astronomy Domine.") Anyway, I suppose that in 1967, it made sense for a singer to distance himself from someone like Arnold, and that the disinterested vocal might've been a way to achieve this. Furthermore, it doesn't seem unlikely that Barrett was influenced by John Lennon's dispassionate delivery of "Strawberry Fields Forever," which was released a few weeks before "Arnold Layne" was completed.

Barrett's singing is a bit more lively - - just a bit - - on the other side. "Candy and a Currant Bun" is a song about? ah, I'm not sure what it's about, but it's psychedelia; maybe that absolves it of requiring meaning. It's easy to say in cases like this that the song must be about drugs, and yet that seems as likely as any other explanation. Whatever it's about, "don't do it again" does not apply here; the opening and closing verses, being nearly identical, imply an enjoyable repetition: "oh my girl sitting in the sky / go buy candy and a currant bun / I like to see you run." But I can't quote the lyrics without relating this couplet, which gives a good indication of song's sophistication: "don't touch me child / please know you drive me wild." The freaky fifteen-second breakdown beginning around 1:06 clarifies that for all of its poppiness, "Candy and a Currant Bun" was not designed for radio airplay, and was probably predestined for the flip side.

Today, Pink Floyd's first single might seem interchangeable with the dozens of other British psychedelic 45s released the same year. But while most of the late-1960s psychedelic pop we remember today was safe and groovy, "Arnold Layne" / "Candy and a Currant Bun" was a bit darker and more daring. However, as a pop or rock single, it's nothing to get hung about. [2 stars on the 4-star scale for singles - - see review page for scale]

====

*Their next single, "See Emily Play," is the closest, in my opinion.

 Wish You Were Here by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.63 | 4024 ratings

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Wish You Were Here
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by hergest ridge

5 stars I think that the most appropriate word for this album is "perfection". Yet Pink Floyd had already reached it with "Dark side of the moon" and "Atom Heart Mother"! The Gilmour guitar game reflects his sonic exploration and is very atmospheric. Waters' lyrics give emotion and clearly express the absence of Syd Barrett. Wright's mastery of the synthetiseur gives the whole guideline to "Welcome to the machine" and to the rest. Mason's drumming fits well in the compositions. Great introduction, robotic sound effects, a very good saxophonist, Roy Harper on vocals on "Have a cigar", backing vocals by two american singers are other features of this masterpiece of progressive music. If Pink Floyd has definitely stopped composing music, I would like to finish by saying : "Shine on you Pink Floyd" for all your contributions to rock and prog!
 Meddle by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.30 | 3059 ratings

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Meddle
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Zoltanxvamos

5 stars Does this album really need any introduction? Meddle by Pink Floyd, what an atmospheric masterpiece. In my Top 10 best prog albums of all times. Now this one doesn't make too much sense so I will help you along. First 'One of These Days' ... echoed bassline, interesting synth sounds, fantastic slide guitar solo, and well played drumming. This first song just proves that Pink Floyd can do no wrong with their more atmospheric, psychedelic prog. There aren't any real lyrics, for the most part this song is instrumental, and any words in this song that can be considered lyrics just add to the psychedelic, atmospheric progressive rock that this album produces so unbelievably well. 'A Pillow of Winds'... David Gilmour... your voice is just so brilliant on this album, this song shows your true colours and your guitar playing abilities. This album does have David singing lead more and I like that. This track is interesting, still atmospheric and it just... fits the mood of the album. 'Fearless', this track is just ... interesting to say the least, such a unique track, interesting lyrics, great chord progression, boring yet fitting drums and so forth. It's a strong song on an already strong album. 'San Tropez' is... well... weird... it's a good track, I would say it's the weakest song on the album. This song is weak but... it is still good, good lyrics, good chords, weak atmosphere, and decent vocals. All in all this song isn't all that great but it is still a fine track that works on this album. It's not that It doesn't fit on this album, it fits perfectly, it's just me not being able to get into it. Now next is Seamus, 'Seamus' has always been the weirdest song on this album. Some wouldn't consider this a song but I love it, such a weird idea, fits really well into this strange album. Now for Echoes, 'Echoes' being the epic on this album, it is over 20 minutes long. I feel this song just shows the creativity of the band, how they can make such a long song feel so short. I just love how unbelievably atmospheric this song is, with so many parts on this song that flow within each other. The lyrics on this song are quirky, moody, deep and clear. Richard Wright and David Gilmour sing together on this piece, fitting no? Well either way it fits, David and Richard work very well on this song. Have I been going on about this song for too long? Well too bad I have more to say. The mid point of the song is where the song turns, dark, haunting, and such weird and dark guitar playing. This song gave me goosebumps when I was a kid, and it gives me goosebumps even today, this song makes most songs look weak atmospherically. Either way this song is just the most gorgeous Pink Floyd song in their discography. There isn't much that I can say that will help you understand more. Just look at it from my perspective and see what I'm trying to say. Once you do, it is clear how absolutely mindbending this entire album is.
 The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1967
3.87 | 1943 ratings

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The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by MaxPap

3 stars Part 1 of a review series on Pink Floyd.

Pink Floyd is the band that got me into this whole musical heaven that is the world of progressive rock music. I should be thankful of them for that. It all started with these four notes in Shine On You Crazy Diamond... But wait, we're not there yet. It didn't take me long to listen to their whole discography and know almost every song of them by heart. It even was the first time I genuinely loved a band and could distinct its members! Let's dig all the way down to Piper. The holy album of psychedelic amateurs, Syd Barrett fans, and even 4chan's /mu/ board.

It's with Floyd's first two albums that you realize they do not really have a specific sound. Every album is just so different, yet every single one of them is good. Piper, although the most different, is no exception. From the first bass notes of "Astronomy Domine", to the cynical, devilish baby-laugh track at the end of "Bike", it's a psychedelic masterpiece. I said it! Masterpiece! Then why does this have three starts? Well, because I said psychedelic, not progressive. Technically I'm not playing fair with Piper, but let's dig down each track of the album.

Astronomy Domine is probably the song you'll dig first, not because it's the first song of the UK release but because it's the lightest one you can digest in there. Cool four-minutes single, perhaps? Definitively something revolutionary for its time: 1967.

Lucifer Sam starts off very catchy. It talks about a cat, that has something I can't explain. You see, Syd Barrett (Founder of Floyd and member in the first two albums before he went into mental breakdown and had to leave) wrote 97% of the album by himself, and he probably was on acid the whole time. You can see the psychedelic influences here more than in any album of the time. Piper definitively surpasses albums like Sgt. Pepper's in terms of craziness. It's usually good craziness in our case.

We continue with Mathilda Mother, and I'll mention here that Piper has a lot of catchy melodies formed into pure psych, so it's a weird mix between the two. Especially here ; it's a mix of the worst drugs you can have, and a sweet album like, once again, Sgt. Pepper's. BUT...! We get to have an awesome organ solo here by the great Richard Wright, and it adds a lot to the prog scene. All of this before cutting to the main chorus in unusual ways. Oh, mother! Tell me more...

So far so good, right? Now there's Flaming, which contains a short psychedelic intro, but it's a bit nonsense. I love the lyrics, but what do they mean, really? Having something original is great, but if it's nonsense, it's not great. So I have mixed feelings about it. I won't deny the diversity of instruments and effects is impressive here.

Pow R. Toc H........ Yeah. They clearly were on drugs. I'll stop here with the drugs and psychs, because it's crystal clear obvious that it's what you get in this album. This instrumental has to be the most crazy track in there ; it blends chill tambourine / organ sounds with awful vocal effects. It's enjoyable, but also not enjoyable at the same time.

Take Up Thy Stethoscope and Walk is the only one here not written by Syd ; Instead, it's written by Roger Waters. My regards goes pretty much the same as for Flaming.

The second side starts with Insterstellar Overdrive ; This should be the one that's more prog. And you're right, it is the proggiest one of the bunch, but I have a hard time liking the five-minute (or so) middle section that contains pretty much the same theme, rythm and tedious tambourines. The intro is great though, as well as the crazy part where your headphones (or speakers) jump from one side to another.

The Gnome is a sweet short story about, well a gnome. I like the general mood of this one.

I can say the same thing for Chapter 24. These two songs are the bizarre stories I wish Syd did more, instead of talking nonsense like in Flaming (Not that it's bad).

The Scarecrow is a little disappointing, really. The acoustic guitar at the end is great, and I know you gotta consider how ahead of its time this is, but how boring this is for a song. I hate the term but I'll call this a filler.

Finally, you have the craziest one (Forget Pow R....) at the end. Bike is a psychedelic masterpiece written by the genius of Syd on LSD, but again, is it really progressive? Or just adding effects to compel with your outrageous personality?

As I'm finishing this review, I think I'll stop analysing every song as it gets not only long and boring, but a lot of things have already been said. So let's skip right to my general review of Piper. It's good. But is it essential? No. This is a psychedelic masterpiece. Unless you dig it, you won't fall in love with this album. That is how I justify my three stars. But don't worry! The best is yet to come...

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Lazland (w/ Quinino help) for the last updates

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