Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

PINK FLOYD

Psychedelic/Space Rock • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Pink Floyd picture
Pink Floyd biography
Formed in 1965 in London, UK - Disbanded in 1994 - Reunited with different formation on several ocasions

One of the biggest bands of all time

Of all the bands who come under the progressive rock banner, Pink Floyd are, arguably, the act most recognisable in the wider music community to music lovers of all genres. Yet, as revealed famously by Nick Mason in an old interview, even at the height of their fame, they could walk down any street, and passers-by would not have recognised a member of one of the most commercially successful acts in music history.

The band were formed in London in 1965, the original members being Roger (known as Syd) BARRETT on vocals and lead guitar, Nick MASON on drums, Roger WATERS on bass guitar and vocals, and Rick WRIGHT on keyboards.

The London of the late 1960's was a melting pot of live acts and varying musical genres, and the band gained a cult following amongst the underground psychedelic crowd of the time. This expanded into a more public consciousness with a residency at the famous UFO Club, with a hypnotic light show and pulsating, often indescribable, sounds. This led to television appearances, most famously an interview and live performance on BBC The Look of the Week, with a rather bemused classical performer Hans Keller in tow. Waters was famously asked just why everything had to be so loud?!

This popularity led to the band signing to EMI, who in 1967 released two hit singles, Arnold Layne, which attracted controversy regarding its cross-dressing themes, and See Emily Play. They charted in the UK at 20 and 6 respectively.

The debut album which followed, Piper At The Gates Of Dawn, is universally recognised as being hugely influential in rock music, beyond the narrow confines of psychedelia. It peaked at number 6 in the UK album charts in 1967, and the band continued to play not only their residency, but also increasing numbers of national gigs and festivals.

The strain, however, was beginning to tell on Barrett, and a fragile mental state, exacerbated by LSD, led to him becoming almost semi-detached from the band and wider reality. The situation became such that the band, at the end of 1967, drafted in David GILMOUR ...
read more

PINK FLOYD forum topics / tours, shows & news


PINK FLOYD forum topics Create a topic now
PINK FLOYD tours, shows & news Post an entries now

PINK FLOYD Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all PINK FLOYD videos (5) | Search and add more videos to PINK FLOYD

Buy PINK FLOYD Music



More places to buy PINK FLOYD music online

PINK FLOYD discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

PINK FLOYD top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.87 | 2232 ratings
The Piper at the Gates of Dawn
1967
3.67 | 1963 ratings
A Saucerful of Secrets
1968
3.14 | 1514 ratings
More (OST)
1969
3.46 | 1898 ratings
Ummagumma
1969
3.90 | 2462 ratings
Atom Heart Mother
1970
4.30 | 3441 ratings
Meddle
1971
3.37 | 1744 ratings
Obscured by Clouds
1972
4.61 | 4677 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon
1973
4.64 | 4491 ratings
Wish You Were Here
1975
4.53 | 4040 ratings
Animals
1977
4.09 | 3262 ratings
The Wall
1979
3.19 | 2027 ratings
The Final Cut
1983
3.07 | 1896 ratings
A Momentary Lapse of Reason
1987
3.74 | 2228 ratings
The Division Bell
1994
3.26 | 972 ratings
The Endless River
2014

PINK FLOYD Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.42 | 628 ratings
Delicate Sound of Thunder
1988
3.96 | 846 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
4.11 | 533 ratings
Is There Anybody Out There?
2000
3.90 | 50 ratings
Live at Knebworth 1990
2021
3.57 | 7 ratings
Live in Venice
2021
4.08 | 16 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon Live at Wembley 1974
2023

PINK FLOYD Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.76 | 572 ratings
Live at Pompeii
1981
4.12 | 605 ratings
The Wall (The Movie)
1982
3.69 | 197 ratings
In Concert - Delicate Sound Of Thunder
1989
2.97 | 66 ratings
La Carrera Panamericana
1992
4.45 | 570 ratings
P-U-L-S-E
1995
3.14 | 104 ratings
London - Live 66-67
1999
4.59 | 683 ratings
Live at Pompeii (The Director's Cut)
2003
4.08 | 193 ratings
Classic Albums: The Dark Side Of The Moon
2003
2.90 | 62 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd
2003
3.29 | 74 ratings
The Pink Floyd & Syd Barrett Story
2003
2.38 | 36 ratings
Inside Pink Floyd Volume 2 - A Critical Review 1975 - 1996
2005
2.20 | 21 ratings
The Ultimate Review
2005
2.27 | 24 ratings
The World's Greatest Albums - Atom Heart Mother
2005
2.70 | 25 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here
2005
2.24 | 24 ratings
Reflections And Echoes
2006
2.91 | 26 ratings
Rock Milestones Pink Floyd's The Piper At The Gates of Dawn
2006
1.64 | 27 ratings
Rock Milestones: Ummagumma
2006
2.05 | 18 ratings
Music Box Biographical Collection
2006
2.22 | 23 ratings
The Dark Side - Interviews
2006
2.17 | 20 ratings
Total Rock Review
2006
2.69 | 23 ratings
Meddle: A Classic Album Under Review
2007
3.04 | 23 ratings
Retrospectives
2007
1.96 | 19 ratings
The Early Pink Floyd - A Review And Critique
2008
2.21 | 19 ratings
Comfortably Numb
2008
2.93 | 25 ratings
A Technicolor Dream
2008
3.58 | 31 ratings
Live Anthology
2008
2.06 | 24 ratings
The Great Gig In The Sky: The Album By Album Guide
2008
3.97 | 95 ratings
The Story of Wish You Were Here
2012

PINK FLOYD Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.21 | 45 ratings
The Best Of The Pink Floyd
1970
3.59 | 420 ratings
Relics
1971
3.30 | 140 ratings
A Nice Pair
1973
2.74 | 68 ratings
Masters Of Rock Vol. 1
1974
2.23 | 226 ratings
A Collection of Great Dance Songs
1981
2.23 | 163 ratings
Works
1983
3.08 | 5 ratings
Hits
1983
3.53 | 105 ratings
Shine On
1992
3.67 | 131 ratings
The Early Singles
1992
3.10 | 77 ratings
1967: The First Three Singles
1997
3.46 | 276 ratings
Echoes - The Best of Pink Floyd
2001
4.08 | 94 ratings
Oh By The Way...
2007
2.90 | 69 ratings
A Foot In The Door: The Best Of Pink Floyd
2011
4.44 | 84 ratings
Discovery
2011
4.79 | 148 ratings
The Dark Side of the Moon - Experience Edition
2011
4.65 | 144 ratings
The Dark Side Of The Moon - Immersion Edition
2011
4.74 | 163 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Experience Edition
2011
4.53 | 132 ratings
Wish You Were Here - Immersion Edition
2011
4.31 | 97 ratings
The Wall - Experience Edition
2011
1.97 | 65 ratings
The Wall Singles
2011
3.92 | 110 ratings
The Wall - Immersion Edition
2012
4.19 | 54 ratings
The Division Bell (20th Anniversary Deluxe Box)
2014
3.95 | 65 ratings
The Early Years 1967-1972 Creation
2016
3.44 | 17 ratings
The Early Years Continu/ation 1967-1974 Sessions
2016
4.52 | 27 ratings
The Early Years 1965-1967 Cambridge St/ation
2017
4.09 | 26 ratings
The Early Years 1968 Germin/Ation
2017
3.62 | 26 ratings
The Early Years 1969 Dramatis/ation
2017
4.40 | 30 ratings
The Early Years 1970 Devi/ation
2017
3.64 | 25 ratings
The Early Years 1971 Reverber/ation
2017
3.89 | 25 ratings
The Early Years 1972 Obfusc/ation
2017
3.79 | 34 ratings
The Later Years 1987 - 2019
2019
3.38 | 8 ratings
The Later Years 1987-2019 (Highlights)
2019

PINK FLOYD Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.61 | 98 ratings
Arnold Layne
1967
3.37 | 107 ratings
See Emily Play
1967
2.81 | 69 ratings
Apples And Oranges
1967
2.64 | 71 ratings
Tonite Let's All Make Love In London
1967
3.69 | 36 ratings
Flaming
1967
3.40 | 56 ratings
It Would Be So Nice
1968
3.71 | 56 ratings
Point Me at the Sky
1968
2.94 | 48 ratings
The Nile Song
1969
3.85 | 83 ratings
One Of These Days
1971
4.00 | 23 ratings
Free Four
1972
4.00 | 14 ratings
Free Four / Absolutely Curtains
1972
3.79 | 96 ratings
Money
1973
3.64 | 88 ratings
Time
1973
3.66 | 78 ratings
Have a Cigar
1975
3.61 | 9 ratings
Pigs on the Wing / Sheep
1977
4.55 | 11 ratings
Pigs (Three Different Ones)
1977
3.86 | 81 ratings
Comfortably Numb
1979
3.67 | 91 ratings
Another Brick In The Wall
1979
3.45 | 71 ratings
Run Like Hell
1980
3.29 | 63 ratings
When the Tigers Broke Free
1982
1.99 | 61 ratings
Not Now John/The Hero's Return (Part 2)
1983
2.53 | 68 ratings
Learning To Fly (promo single)
1987
3.10 | 64 ratings
On the Turning Away
1987
3.01 | 44 ratings
One Slip
1988
3.04 | 23 ratings
A Momentary Lapse Of Reason Official Tour CD
1988
2.89 | 26 ratings
Shine On - Selections From The Box
1992
3.25 | 83 ratings
High Hopes/ Keep Talking (single)
1994
3.36 | 68 ratings
Take It Back
1994
3.27 | 11 ratings
Interview Disc
1995
2.88 | 171 ratings
London '66-'67
1999
4.12 | 55 ratings
Louder Than Words
2014
2.77 | 24 ratings
Pink Floyd 1965 - Their First Recordings
2015
3.09 | 50 ratings
Hey Hey Rise Up (feat. Andriy Khlyvnyuk)
2022

PINK FLOYD Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Animals by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1977
4.53 | 4040 ratings

BUY
Animals
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Sidscrat

4 stars I remember buying this album as it came out in 77 and immediately noticed how different it was from their previous 2 smashes Dark Side (DS) & Wish You Were Here (WYWH). What would make it so different? Roger Waters. Reading the various band comments through this time Roger had started exerting full control over the band. The conflict between Richard Wright and Waters started on this album and would result in his firing during the Wall sessions. DS changed these 4 guys' lives as they suddenly became millionaires and as is so common, almost a necessity, marriages started breaking up and in Gilmour's case he had his first child. This gravely affected the writing and Waters was ready to full steam ahead push the next disc out and the others were going through various personal issues. Gilmour wanted more time to present some ideas but Waters was headstrong and pushed his way through.

Gilmour's own words on the album later were: "It wasn't one of the more productive periods of our life I don't think. We used those two tracks which went back to '74, changed the names, doctored them around and stuck them on the album. I love the album; it was exciting and noisy and fun. It really had some great bits and stuff of effects on there but it was not one of our creative high points really."

In the world of music, bands that pass from no one knowing about them to all out stardom, creates changes and sadly many for the worst. I consider Animals the last of the best of the Floyd albums with Waters. The Wall was way overrated in my opinion and I was not that fond of it when it came out and still am not today. Why? It was essentially a Roger Waters' album. There was very little collaboration. The Final Cut was just an extension of that album and was by far their lowest point musically.

When we read about the band's thoughts of the making of DS we hear of a band that were working well together and everyone was involved sometimes even treading into areas that were not normal theirs. WYWH was also more of a collaboration and it can be seen and felt but even then, Waters was exercising control. I cannot blame him for all of this alone. Again, the band's personal lives were a mess and busy so music took a backstage (pun intended) position rather than being center stage.

All this history and thoughts which my posts seem to have a lot of, the album is different but good. Gilmour only helped write Dogs and the rest was Waters. I personally think that Gilmour is a better vocalist so it would have been good to hear him more but Waters' voice on Sheep was perfect for him to sing. The book end Pigs On The Wong I think are nothing more than filler that really are unnecessary and just take up time on the record.

The sound effects with the various animals (dogs, pigs, sheep) are fine but a little too overdone. The mellow break in the middle of Dogs is somewhat reminiscent of Echoes off Meddle a but it drones on a little too long. Gilmour's guitar work on that song and the album was superb. The 3 main songs all have something to offer but they could have cut down the times a bit and made room for something else.

The best song for me was Sheep. Its attacks are brilliant and relevance to the sociopolitical situation at that time are brilliantly brought forth. As others have noted, like Orwell's writing's the world has taken its ideas far too seriously! It could be a 21st century anthem at this point! Prog wise, it is definitely that so I can give it a higher rating but Animals doesn't come close to touching the greatness of the 2 previous smashes. Sadly this led to the dreaded Wall and worse yet the Final Cut.

 The Dark Side of the Moon Live at Wembley 1974 by PINK FLOYD album cover Live, 2023
4.08 | 16 ratings

BUY
The Dark Side of the Moon Live at Wembley 1974
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by [email protected]

4 stars An interesting release, this one. It's live so it's certainly different from the original studio recording. I get the sense from listening to this album that the band spent some time all learning their parts, where they fit in and how to play their pieces in sequence in a live setting. There is a little bit of hesitation in some of the playing by the band and some of the transitions from instrumental to vocal pieces sound a bit rushed but not enough to distract the listener too much. However, I am left wondering if a few of Gilmour's vocals have been redone recently in the studio. Gilmour's guitar shines very brightly throughout and Waters' bass parts sound rich and perfect. Wright's keys seem a bit buried in the mix sometimes and Mason's drums tend to come across as a bit withdrawn, until side two releases him to really play, up there with the others. Side one throughout, on the vinyl version is very good if a bit muted. Side two is where this album really comes alive. The version of Us and Them on here is just magnificent. One thing. This live album has to be played loud. Very loud. That way, all the sounds coming through both left and right channels really sound fantastic. Despite some parts sounding a little bit like easy listening background lounge Muzak, overall this is an enjoyable listen which left me wishing I was there, when it was recorded.
 Obscured by Clouds by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.37 | 1744 ratings

BUY
Obscured by Clouds
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by altered_beast

3 stars Even though it might be the weakest album of the decade for Pink Floyd, it has a great collection of songs. Stay, Wots the Deal, Free Four, Burning Bridges, and Childhoods End are all songs I love. The instrumentals are a bit inconsistent but get better and better as the album goes giving it a better flow. Yes this is a soundtrack for a movie so it's not going to be a conventional Pink Floyd album. I still like it much better than More. I also like the extra contributions made by Gilmour and Wright that are very present on this album.

Before there were what are often categorized as soft Progressive Rock albums from the likes of Ambrosia, Alan Parsons Project, Al Stewart, etc this does highly resemble something of that sort. The first 3 Floyd albums of the 70's are easy listening for the most part. Maybe this one is a bit more accessible and conventional. Reminds me of something like Bread with Prog elements. This album has experimental parts that would interest Prog Rock fans but is much more relaxed than anything else Pink Floyd did in that decade.

I really like this album a lot. Have listened to it many times. It might even rank #3 or #4 of Floyd albums I have listened to the most times all the way through. At the same time as great of a song selection that it has it lacks what Pink Floyd can accomplish with a concept album or one of their masterpieces.

 Atom Heart Mother by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1970
3.90 | 2462 ratings

BUY
Atom Heart Mother
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by altered_beast

4 stars Being 1970 this album is right in between the awkward experimental phase. And being before Meddle where the band would find direction they were happier with that would help shape the future. This album is where the band starts to really display a much higher level of greatness and showing much greater potential but missing the mark they were hoping for.

The result is an often misunderstood album but also original sounding album that has moments of brilliance, originality, obscurity, and very well liked Pink Floyd albums by diehards that many people have never had the chance to hear. Mirroring of the band arrangements with orchestral arrangements. Plenty of Jazz and Classical elements and influences. Perhaps it was the collaboration efforts and not doing enough on their own that made them feel insecure about this album. Even crazier that critics actually really liked this album.

The suite Atom Heart Mother is interesting to listen to. I have heard some people call it pretentious but I fully disagree. This is 1970 we are talking about. Symphonic Metal bands often use the arrangements of band with choir and orchestra. And we are talking decades later. This is once again Pink Floyd projecting the future without even knowing about it. Alan Parsons used this formula in multiple albums. This is also the first album he was involved in with Pink Floyd.

If a humorous song about a relationship that didn't work which would go into the next song. Weakest track on the album. I do like Richard Wrights piano solos towards the end.

Summer of '68is avery Jazz influenced piece from Richard Wright. And of course Jazz influences would continue to intensify throughout Pink Floyd's music throughout most of the 70's. Both Cool Jazz and Fusion influences.

Fat Old Sun is considered a classic and a very beautiful and well liked song. David Gilmour would make it more of a staple for his live shows going into the 2000's.

Alan's Psychedelic Breakfast is really bizarre due to the background noises. When the music gets good it gets really good. Some really cool Jazz moments I really enjoy.

An obscure overlooked gem overall. It might not make my top 5 but I feel it's a very monumental album that really shows a step in the right direction and a huge breakthrough for the band that would continue all throughout the 70's. The perfect way to start the decade and something completely different formula that would never be used again that only adds to this album being more interesting.

While everything and everyone had to get better after the standards set by In the Court of the Crimson King, Pink Floyd would try something entirely different and made something unique.

 The Division Bell by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.74 | 2228 ratings

BUY
The Division Bell
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Hector Enrique

4 stars The success of "A Momentary Lapse of Reason," which led to one of the biggest rock tours of the late 80s, demonstrated to the world that there was a possible life for Pink Floyd post-Roger Waters. With that momentum, 7 years later, they delivered "The Division Bell," which ultimately ended up being the band's last studio album (because, to be rigorous and not let ourselves be carried away by emotion, "The Endless River" cannot be considered a concept album as such...).

"The Division Bell" respects and connects with the band's history, maintaining atmospheric structures that wander through territories no longer as much spatial, but rather focused on human relationships, with melancholy and a halo of brotherhood as guiding threads. It was not an easy road because, while Waters' absence brought peace and harmony to the group, on the other hand, it diminished their ability to articulate and create powerful proposals that only he was capable of. Several musicians were called upon to fill the void, and even Gilmour's wife had to assist with the lyrics, a process that had become a nightmare for the guitarist.

The result was more than a worthy work, with very good tracks, such as the intense and raspy "What do you Want From Me," the almost obligatory reference to the eternal Barrett and the bellicose Waters in "Poles Apart," the festive and enthusiastic "Take it Back," the beautiful initial guitar solo of "Coming Back to Life," and the majestic "High Hopes," which closes the album dissolving into chimes.

It's likely that even the members of Pink Floyd didn't have a clear understanding at that time that "The Division Bell" would be the final chapter (or almost...) of the story of one of the most influential rock bands of all time.

3.5 stars

 Wish You Were Here by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1975
4.64 | 4491 ratings

BUY
Wish You Were Here
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by BBKron

5 stars Sure, Dark Side of the Moon is their monumental best-selling iconic classic, but for me, this is their overall best album, primarily due to the presence of the wonderful epic Shine On You Crazy Diamond and Wish You Were Here. Just sensational and so inspiring. Shine On... is split into two halves that bookend the rest of the album and provide the overriding moody presence throughout. Its slowly building mood and atmosphere (its a full 8 minutes into the album before the melody and vocals of the song kick in) eventually erupting into the cathartic release of the full chorus is magical and magnificent. Then Welcome to the Machine and Have a Cigar are darkly comic and engaging musical commentaries on the band's recent commercial success. But the acoustic masterpiece title track remains my favorite Pink Floyd song with its beautiful and moving melody and refrain. Then closing with another extended dose of Shine On.., a truly masterful album.
 The Dark Side of the Moon by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1973
4.61 | 4677 ratings

BUY
The Dark Side of the Moon
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Frets N Worries

5 stars As a younger prog rock fan (we exist!), I just listened to this album for the first time last June, and heard my first Pink Floyd song on a local radio station, and quite liked it. I had always liked longer songs, but only things like 7, 8 minutes. The first 'long' song i really got into, was 'Telegraph Road' I loved the elaborate arrangement and guitar work, and the grand scale of it. Which led me naturally to prog, and after hearing 'Money' for the first time, and seeing this album cover the entirety of my life, I decided to pop the record on, and was amazed by what I saw.

First, we have Speak To Me/Breathe. Speak to me introduces the album, and is a sound collage, more than anything. Breathe opens us up with some beautiful pedal steel guitar and David Gilmour at the peak of his powers. The opening lyrics, of course, being 'Breathe, Breathe in the air, don't be afraid to care." Which sets the mood and tone for the album. The next song is another sound collage (the songs transition right into one another, which makes for an AMAZING listening experience) named 'On the Run' plane noises, car noises, noises of travel. Travelling, moving from place to place. The next song we have is 'Time' which has the most beautiful lyrics every written in the most existential way, with one of Gilmour's most passionate guitar solos, if you listen to nothing else off this album, listen to this song. The side closes with 'The Great Gig in the Sky' the beauty of which can not be put in to words, other than the vocalist (Clare Torry) accepting death. Side 2 opens with the hit-single 'Money' with a catchy riff in 7/4. Great Sax and Guitar solo, talks about the love of money. 'Us and Them' is a wee bit too long, but it's great, a bit jazzy, some smooth sax. It's all about war, there's some about love, it's a very pretty song. This transitions into 'Any Colour You Like' it's an instrumental, structured loosely around 'Breathe' the song's title derives from a Henry Ford quote, saying 'The customer can have any color he wants, as long as it's black.' So the song tells the illusion of choice. This leads into the finale of The Dark Side of the Moon, 'Brain Damage' and 'Eclipse'. 'Brain Damage drops the most cathartic title drop in all of music history. 'And if your head explodes with dark forebodings too, I'll see you on the Dark Side of the Moon' A couple of the lyrics are inspired by former front man Syd Barrett, who had gone crazy due to drugs, and overuse of LSD. (Which is why they've got Shine On You Crazy Diamond, which is one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever written, if you know the backstory) This transitions us into the final song on the album, an epic finale, 'Eclipse' listing off many things from the rest of the album, and closing with the line 'Everything under the sun is in tune, but the sun is eclipsed by the moon' Which asks the question, out of everything we do in life, do we make a difference? Do we really matter? Very existential. As the closing heartbeat fills your ears, you hear the final of many spoken words throughout the album. 'There is no dark side of the moon, as a matter of fact it's all dark' bum bum... bum bum... bum bum.... The Dark Side of the Moon has stood the test of time more than many albums that have come before it, if you want to hear someone wax on poetically about it, might I recommend Polyphonic's video series on it, song by song. Listen to the full album FIRST of course.

 The Final Cut by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1983
3.19 | 2027 ratings

BUY
The Final Cut
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by Sidscrat

1 stars Why? What possible reason would anyone want to follow up an epic album with this mess? To be honest I heard "Dark Side" and "Wish You Were Here" after they came out and those 2 albums really marked Floyd's best. I am a fan of "Meddle" as well. When "Animals" was released I bought it and was surprised as it is a departure from the previous 2 albums but it was still good and a nice change. They actually reused some material from 1974 (Wish You Were Here sessions) but it sure didn't sound like it. I know that bands shift over time as they cannot just stay in the same type of sound as it gets repetitive. "Animals" is actually one of my all-time favorite albums by them and by itself.

Floyd have always pushed the limit and when "The Wall" was released in 79' I went out and got it anticipating some similarity to Animals or the previous works but what I heard was so far removed. It took me a number of years to really appreciate it and today I do but it still marked a definite shift into songs packed with words and less instrumentals. I suppose it is only fair since it was essentially a rock opera. To this day it is not one of my favorite albums by any artist though I like it better than I used to.

Roger Waters is an egomaniac from what I have seen from his own words to this day and others in the band. He began dominating the studio sessions during "Animals." Gilmour admitted he didn't have any material but needed time and Roger was not keen on giving it and Mason and Wright were also not ripe with material. So, Floyd started to become something different; Waters different. "The Wall" was his baby and it sounds like it. And he to this day brags about it and how little anyone in the band did anything and says the same about most of their past albums as though he is Floyd. When "A Momentary Lapse Of Reason" was released it was proven that Floyd survived. While it is different in many ways from previous work, I do like its sound far better.

So with Wright kicked out of the band (by Waters' demand) they reassembled while things were at an all time relational low. Once again, he dominated by pushing these leftovers trying to squeeze out a record. Gilmour was not happy but had little choice but to go along with it.

Okay, aside from the background and my own opinions on the previous music, what about the album? As I started out saying: Why?! I cannot get on with this record. If I disregard the words and listen to it all it sounds like is an extension of The Wall. The same sounds and textures and Waters' voice dominating the mix. But these songs are lacking at best. I cannot even find a song that I like all the way through. The

I didn't find much on this record to make me want to keep hearing it. It is simply a bad Wall album. I never bought this album when it first came out as I had heard it was more to make the record company happy and I only recently downloaded it and wish I had not. After hearing it several times it didn't get better. Floyd's last album post Rick Wright "The Endless River" sounds far more Floydish and enjoyable than this Roger Waters solo album wannabe. And that is really all it is other than a regurgitated Wall.

The instrumentation was sorely lacking. It is a lyrical mess. Gilmour guitar bits are a far cry from anything memorable and it is obvious he didn't really want to play on it. Mason's drumming is lethargic and the loss of Rick Wright is obvious as his work is part of the glue that makes Floyd what it was.

This album was a waste and really damages Floyd's overall reputation. I see it as a Roger Ego album that was far too similar to what came before it. 1 star.

 The Endless River by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 2014
3.26 | 972 ratings

BUY
The Endless River
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TheEliteExtremophile

1 stars In 2014, Pink Floyd announced The Endless River, composed primarily of instrumental outtakes and experiments recorded during the Division Bell sessions. A small number of additions were made in 2013 to complete the album.

When this was announced, I set my expectations low. Gilmour had proven himself to be an inconsistent songwriter, and the prospect of something stitched together from leftover bits did not leave me optimistic.

My initial reaction to The Endless River was, "Wow, this is surprisingly not-[&*!#]ty!" I then proceeded to not listen to it again until writing this essay six years later. That should tell you all you really need to know. It's passable instrumental space rock in small doses, but nothing makes this record noteworthy or worth revisiting. The ungainly length of this record is a hindrance, and it truly lives up to the endlessness promised in its name.

"Things Left Unsaid" is emblematic of many of the sins of this era of Pink Floyd. A dull synth drone acts as the backdrop to a slow, languid guitar line for four-and-a-half minutes. It's "Cluster One" trying to be the closing moments of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond". "It's What We Do" is an improvement, insofar as it has a pulse. This again feels like a weak, sterile attempt to recreate moments off "Shine on You Crazy Diamond". With this being an instrumental album, Roger Waters's presence isn't missed. He was never a standout bassist, as I've mentioned previously, and his playing almost always bled into the background as Wright and Gilmour took the lead. This album's flaccid opening movement closes with the brief "Ebb and Flow", which is all ebb and no flow.

"Sum" is the first place where the album does anything interesting. Wright's organ stutters in a way which evokes many of Floyd's best songs, including "Astronomy Domine". It's too long and lacks direction, but I'll take aimless jamming over aimless airiness. "Skins" is a callback to early cuts like "A Saucerful of Secrets" and "Up the Khyber" with Nick Mason's distinct, tom-heavy drumming style taking the lead. When a drum solo is the strongest cut on an album so far, that's usually not a good sign. "Anisina" is too sweet, and it feels like generic background music to be used in a heartwarming scene on a made-for-TV movie. I also hate the tone of the saxophone on this song.

Another brief, ambient piece?"The Lost Art of Conversation"?doesn't do much beyond occupy two minutes of time, but "On Noodle Street" is one of the better tracks on The Endless River. It's not particularly good in absolute terms, mind you, but enough happens on this brief cut to keep me interested. It's mellow and jazzy, but my ultimate assessment is simply "inoffensive."

"Night Light" harbors some darker, minor-key tones, and "Allons-y" finally gets something going with its bouncing rhythm and a guitar line that could have been one of the better songs on The Wall. "Autumn '68" is a pointless mini-fugue which leads back into the second half of "Allons-y". "Talkin' Hawkin'" features more vocal snippets from Stephen Hawking, and it's nice that this song has enough percussion to maintain an identifiable beat.

"Calling", which opens side 4 of this album, is an interesting collection of moody synthesizers. This one could have been workshopped into something better, but there are nuggets of good ideas here. "Eyes to Pearls" stays in the same neighborhood but with a bit more muscle, and "Surfacing" is one of the rare cuts to feel like a real song.

The one song with vocals?"Louder Than Words"?closes out The Endless River. It's a pretty typical Gilmour-era ballad. Soulful background singers in the chorus feel like a crutch, and the instrumentation doesn't do much to grab the listener. Giving credit where credit is due, the closing guitar solo is quite good.

Looking on this record with relatively fresh eyes, I find its immense bloat and frequent aimlessness hobble any other redeeming qualities. It isn't actively bad in most cases, but it's frequently downright anodyne. Oftentimes, boring is worse than bad. Ummagumma's studio disc is an ungodly, unfocused morass, but they at least were trying weird and different things. The Endless River is endlessly safe. It was a disappointing, unnecessary way for Pink Floyd to wrap up their career.

Review originally posted here: theeliteextremophile.com/2021/03/01/deep-dive-pink-floyd/

 The Division Bell by PINK FLOYD album cover Studio Album, 1994
3.74 | 2228 ratings

BUY
The Division Bell
Pink Floyd Psychedelic/Space Rock

Review by TheEliteExtremophile

3 stars The Division Bell was released in 1994 and is unquestionably the strongest of Floyd's three post-Waters albums. Rick Wright rejoined the band as a full member, and his contributions are both noticeable and appreciated.

The Division Bell, though, like many albums from the 1990s, is way, way too long. No longer constrained by the roughly 45 minutes you could comfortably fit on an LP, many bands of that era seemed to have been compelled to pump out hour-plus releases simply because they could. Just because a CD can hold 80 minutes, that doesn't mean you need to put 80 minutes of music on a CD.

This is immediately evident with the opener, "Cluster One". I get what they were going for, but this five-minute piece could have easily been shortened to one minute.

"What Do You Want from Me" is passable, kinda funkyish, and sorta-prog. (Look, prog was not in good shape in 1994.) The soulful background singers and over-the-top guitar flourishes sound a bit silly now, but in context, it's not bad.

"Poles Apart" is delightfully varied. The folkiness of the guitar is a nice change of pace, and the lyrics are some of Gilmour's better work. Bits could be seen as addressing either Roger Waters or Syd Barrett.

"Marooned" won Pink Floyd a Grammy for the first (and only) time, but Rush really should have won that year. The Simpsons was correct in its Grammy commentary. It's a strong, melodic instrumental, but it suffers from being culturally overhyped. Gilmour's guitarwork is overdone, and Mason's drumming is too restrained. The keyboard playing feels just (w)right, though.

Let's skip "A Great Day for Freedom". That song sucks. "Wearing the Inside Out" isn't amazing. It's a bit slow, and the saxophone is a bit much. However, it's Rick Wright's last lead vocal performance, and his first since "Stay" on Obscured by Clouds. (He shared vocal duties on "Time" and provided backing vocals on multiple songs on Wish You Were Here.) All things considered, this bit of melodrama is one of the better cuts on this record.

"Take It Back" should have been taken back, and "Coming Back to Life" should never have been given life in the first place. Both suffer from many late-'80s/early-'90s pop-rock ills and offer nothing new or interesting.

"Keep Talking" is pretty cool, and it features a fitting guest bit from Stephen Hawking's vocal synthesizer. It's jazzy yet spacy, but the soulful backup singers come off as something of a gimmick. "Lost for Words" isn't very strong, so let's skip that as well.

The Division Bell closes on "High Hopes", which was recorded after the rest of the album was completed. It's an overwrought but enjoyable cut. It makes multiple, conscious allusions to past Pink Floyd songs and albums. I can't denounce this song, but I can't fully endorse it either. I like this song, but it feels like it's trying too hard, it's too clever for its own good, and it's too self-aware.

Review originally posted here: theeliteextremophile.com/2021/03/01/deep-dive-pink-floyd/

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to NotAProghead for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives

Donate monthly and keep PA fast-loading and ad-free forever.