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SAGA

Crossover Prog • Canada


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Saga picture
Saga biography
Formed in 1977 in Oakville, Ontario, Canada - Disbanded (announced) in 2017

SAGA... one of the most famous Canadian Hard Progresssive with excellent albums including all elements which made the band's reputation: a taste for symphonism and melodies and real talent for efficient riffs.

From 1978 to 1980, SAGA produced a number of quintessentially "progressive" rock albums. These first albums emerged neo-progressive style bands like IQ, PENDRAGON and PALLAS. In the early's 80's they further perfected their style and seemed a bit as viable as their Canadian compatriots RUSH. Until 1989, suddenly SAGA re-emerged with arguably their strongest album to date: "The Beginner's Guide To Throwing Shapes". They went totally haywire in 1995, releasing "Generation 13" to be a real concept album.

Throughout the years, they created their own particular and unique brand of music. Well, they're still around and they are still making great music but unfortunately radio stations no longer play intelligent, riveting, songs anymore. So, if you're into groups like KANSAS, ASIA, RUSH, STYX, or YES, a new dimension of music awaits you... SAGA!

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SAGA discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

SAGA top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.68 | 251 ratings
Saga
1978
3.25 | 244 ratings
Images at Twilight
1979
3.70 | 254 ratings
Silent Knight
1980
3.69 | 283 ratings
Worlds Apart
1981
3.57 | 215 ratings
Heads or Tales
1983
3.05 | 156 ratings
Behaviour
1985
2.24 | 120 ratings
Wildest Dreams
1987
3.04 | 111 ratings
The Beginners Guide to Throwing Shapes
1989
3.52 | 134 ratings
The Security Of Illusion
1993
2.12 | 102 ratings
Steel Umbrellas
1994
3.94 | 177 ratings
Generation 13
1995
2.24 | 93 ratings
Pleasure & The Pain
1997
3.48 | 129 ratings
Full Circle
1999
3.51 | 144 ratings
House Of Cards
2001
3.29 | 118 ratings
Marathon
2003
3.46 | 112 ratings
Network
2004
3.81 | 189 ratings
Trust
2006
3.63 | 130 ratings
10.000 Days
2007
3.47 | 116 ratings
The Human Condition
2009
3.26 | 101 ratings
20/20
2012
3.26 | 92 ratings
Sagacity
2014
3.65 | 45 ratings
Symmetry
2021

SAGA Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.72 | 115 ratings
In Transit
1982
4.02 | 43 ratings
Detours
1999
3.78 | 41 ratings
The Chapters Live
2005
3.52 | 28 ratings
Worlds Apart Revisited (CD)
2007
2.71 | 25 ratings
Contact Live in Munich
2009
3.11 | 19 ratings
Heads Or Tales Live
2011
4.36 | 11 ratings
Spin It Again! Live in Munich
2013
4.05 | 11 ratings
Live in Hamburg
2016
4.67 | 12 ratings
So Good So Far - Live at Rock of Ages
2018

SAGA Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.56 | 18 ratings
Silhouette
2003
4.00 | 15 ratings
All Areas: Live in Bonn 2002
2004
4.42 | 31 ratings
Worlds Apart Revisited
2007
3.60 | 15 ratings
Contact - Live In Munich (DVD)
2009
4.50 | 10 ratings
Spin it again! - Live in Munich
2013

SAGA Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

2.00 | 1 ratings
Saga
1985
3.00 | 3 ratings
Time's Up
1986
2.96 | 15 ratings
The Works
1991
2.00 | 1 ratings
Wind Him Up: Best
1992
4.33 | 12 ratings
All the Best 1978-1993
1993
1.82 | 12 ratings
The Very Best Of Saga
1994
3.16 | 12 ratings
Defining Moments (Volume 1)
1994
2.67 | 6 ratings
Saga Softworks
1995
2.00 | 2 ratings
Wildest Dreams
1995
2.50 | 8 ratings
How Do I Look
1997
2.60 | 5 ratings
Remember When
2006
3.00 | 1 ratings
The Collection
2013
3.85 | 4 ratings
Best Of Saga. Now & Then - The Collection: 1978 - Infinity
2015
2.15 | 4 ratings
The Polydor Legacy
2017

SAGA Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.00 | 2 ratings
How Long?
1978
2.50 | 2 ratings
Slow Motion
1980
3.00 | 1 ratings
On the Loose
1981
3.00 | 1 ratings
Time's Up
1981
3.00 | 1 ratings
Wind Him Up
1981
3.00 | 1 ratings
Synposis
1981
3.00 | 1 ratings
The Flyer
1983
2.00 | 1 ratings
Scratching the Surface (remixed version)
1983
2.87 | 4 ratings
Scratchin' the Surface
1983
2.00 | 1 ratings
Take a Chance
1985
2.00 | 1 ratings
What Do I Know?
1985
2.00 | 1 ratings
Only Time Will Tell
1987
2.00 | 1 ratings
Angel
1988
2.50 | 2 ratings
Gotta Love It
1991
2.00 | 1 ratings
(You Were) Never Alone
1994
3.50 | 2 ratings
On the Loose
1995
3.14 | 20 ratings
Phase One
1997
3.50 | 6 ratings
Home
1999
3.50 | 6 ratings
Money Talks
2001
4.36 | 13 ratings
It's Your Life
2006

SAGA Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Human Condition by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 2009
3.47 | 116 ratings

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The Human Condition
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by AFlowerKingCrimson

3 stars This album has the distinction of being the only Saga album not to feature the singing of Michael Sadler and instead features Rob Moriatti handling vocal duties. Michael actually does a rather fine job although I'm sure when Sadler returned he wasn't missed by most fans especially considering how Sadler's voice was such a big part of Saga's sound and identity.

While I'm not familiar with most of Saga's work I can see how this fits in with the rest of their canon style wise. It retains their signature heavy guitar rock sound with keyboards providing a nice backdrop much of the time. While most fans who might be identified as elitist prog snobs probably won't enjoy this (not to mention probably not consider it true prog) I think for the long time fan and even casual fans looking for good proggy hard rock will find much to enjoy here.

The album starts with the title track which doesn't feature any real lyrics save for the refrain of "running, from the human condition" which is repeated several times throughout the course of the track. It's a very good way to start an album. The third track "hands of time" is nice, but it is almost a direct rip-off of "silent lucidity" by Queensryche (it's even more or less the same tempo which should be a big clue that they definitely heard that Queensryche tune- then again, who hasn't?). The sixth track "now is now" is particularly catchy and probably one of my favorites. The final track "you look good to me" is also very strong(even if it's a bit repetitive) and not a bad way at all to end the album. The rest of the album is mostly very good and there aren't any real weak tracks on here. All in all a rather solid release of mostly up-tempo rockers with some prog embellishments via the keyboards and an album that will likely grow on you with repeated listens. Nothing too complex here but nonetheless probably a must for most Saga fans.

 Symmetry by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.65 | 45 ratings

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Symmetry
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by kev rowland
Special Collaborator Honorary Reviewer

3 stars I have been a Saga fan for more than 40 years, somehow catching onto the guys just after the release of their second album, 'Images At Twilight' (still my favourite). I was overjoyed when I finally managed to catch them in concert in London (although they were way too quiet) and Michael Sadler is one of my favourite singers. When I heard it was going to be a reimagining of material in a more acoustic manner with some guest string musicians and even the return of Jim Crichton I was interested. Given I listen to as great deal of folk and am certainly able to attend way more folk gigs than prog here in New Zealand I was intrigued to see how this would work.

The response has been incredibly upbeat, with the band gaining some of their highest chart positions in many years. I have also read loads of incredibly positive reviews, yet for some reason this just leaves me cold. I understand what the band is attempting to do, but it just does not feel honest or true enough for me, almost as if Saga are moving in a direction where they are looking for a spark of inspiration, but it has eluded them. This is their first new studio album in 7 years, and instead of exciting vibrant new material we have the band revisiting old songs in a new manner. Many have been excited by this, and I truly wish I were one of them, yet while I can see the influences of groups like Gryphon, for some reason the album just jars. That they have come up with intriguing new arrangements is never in doubt, while they have allowed the fiddle in particular to have a major part while Jim also provides plenty of accordion.

But to my ears there is just something a little off a while this is undoubtedly attractive to many Saga fans, I am not one of them.

 Symmetry by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 2021
3.65 | 45 ratings

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Symmetry
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by Formentera Lady

4 stars As the reviewer TCat already pointed out, for fans there is bad news and good news. The bad news is that the album does not contain brand new material. Instead it contains acoustic versions of previously released songs. And now the good news is, Saga re-invented their tunes augmented with new interludes with surprising arrangements in a way that it sounds astonishingly fresh and sometimes even better than the original. The playful acoustic guitars, which creatively intertwine with the vocals and the other instruments, and the use of cello, violins, clarinet, accordion and piano give the tunes a folk-ish, classical and world music touch. Now and then the British progressive folk band Gryphon comes to mind. Especially the re-imagining of their big hits 'Wind Him Up' and 'No Regrets' are truly stunning listening experiences.
 10.000 Days by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.63 | 130 ratings

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10.000 Days
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

4 stars Studio album number 18 for Saga was supposed to be the last album that vocalist Michael Sadler would sing for the band. As such, it was treated as an important album. It also followed up one of their best albums in a long time, "Trust", which was one of their best "comeback" albums. This one would also turn out to not disappoint, and would have been a great career ending album for the band, one that would have been a respected epilogue.

Lifeline - A return to the form of "Worlds Apart" and "Heads or Tails" with the plucky guitar runs and running keyboard riff. The instrumental break stops the beat for several seconds before it returns to a nice guitar/synth play-off. It's a great, upbeat starter for the album.

Book of Lies - The beat is solider and the guitar is hard and heavy, the vocal melody sound a bit more progressive switching back and forth between tempo/meters. It's another solid track. This one treats you to a longer and blistering guitar solo during the instrumental break.

Sideways - Starts with only a guitar and piano playing a joyful riff before the band kicks in with a somewhat smoother song than the previous two. The staccato playing gives in to obvious over-phrasing, and it makes for a nice dynamic change up. Guitar and marimba mirror each other playing the same riff at one point.

Can't You See Me Now - This is the first of several songs that break the 6 minute mark. The intro almost sounds like an electronic track, but the guitar cuts in quickly and a steady beat begins. Again, the phrasing is important in this one like on the last track. But that clanky electronic/guitar riff contradicts the smoothness of everything else. This one kind of cools off the excitement of the first 3 tracks and it brings the album down a notch. But, in the instrumental break, the guitar picks up the crazy synth riff and runs away with it turning it into a complex passage. The vocal sections take the steam out of the track though. I remember Tapfret mentioning that a badly placed track can end up ruining an entire album, and this track (at least the vocal sections) runs the risk of doing that here. Except for the fact that the next track more than makes up for any ground lost.

Corkentellis - A 7 minute instrumental. By this time in the Saga timeline, it is something I never thought I would say in regards to one of the more recent Saga albums. And it could very well be the best thing Saga has done for a very long time. This one soars through moods and styles effortlessly and is definitely a much needed homage to the instrumentalists of the band. This one is on fire!

More Than I Deserve - After that wild track, this is the ballad of the album, and it is an effective cooling off song after such a showcase of instrumental prowess. This is now Sadler's time to show off his tender side. It's a nice ballad, not the band's best, but good enough.

Sound Advice - This one is a pretty typical Saga track, a good track that is enjoyable, but doesn't stand out among their best tracks. It could be a good single as it is a bit more accessible, but is also catchy enough to not be completely forgotten. However, it would easily fit on one of their lesser albums.

10,000 Days - A song that sees Sadler reflecting on his tenure (at the time) with Saga. It's a nice nostalgic song with a flowing melody and is appropriate for the album considering what it was originally supposed to represent (Sadler's retirement from the band). 10,000 days is representative of the time Sadler spent with the band. Pretty nice for a ballad-style track.

It Never Ends - Probably the best track to end on. It gives the main players a chance to shine in vocals and instrumental sections. A nice way to end any album and musical career on.

As we all know, Sadler did retire for only one album. Saga immediately started looking for a vocalist to take Sadler's place, and they found a suitable replacement in Rob Moratti, who had his own style, yet could also belt out the Sadler songs respectfully enough. However, by the time the album "20/20" was released, Sadler had announced his return to the band, making the album that would follow up this one, "The Human Condition", the only album that Sadler was not a part of. So, it was a false retirement, but that still doesn't take away from the fact that "10,000 Days" is one of Saga's better latter-day albums.

 Worlds Apart by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 1981
3.69 | 283 ratings

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Worlds Apart
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars The producer and recording musician Rupert Hine is really a great secret weapon on this album. Saga had already become a band capable of writing great crossover neoprog songs, but with the refinement of the production the band's music is lifted to a higher plane. I already listened to live versions of tracks like 'On the Loose' and 'Wind Him Up', but I was quite surprised how fresh and detailed these album versions sounded. The band's eighties 'pump' energy is still there, but the layers of synths, the overall sound stage (hugeness of the music) and the dynamics on this record are quite something. Of course the drums have that typical eighties sound and the fills sound particularly dated here. However, the production alone of 'Wind Him Up' makes this a mandatory listen to fans of eighties progressive music. The original vinyl sounds brilliant though and I suspect a more modern remaster will have a bit more to offer on the low-end. The song-writing quality of Saga has never been very consistent and this record is no exception. Whereas the before mentioned tracks are staples of eighties prog rock, most other tracks are more regular eighties synth drenched rock songs. The ballad 'No Regrets' is however a nice melodic oddity with keyboards and a beautiful clarinet part. The production on this track is particularly intelligent as well. The slightly odd instrumental 'Conversations' has its progressive moments as well. The song 'Framed' has a great solo section in that classic Saga fashion (keyboard and guitar interplay). 'The Interview' is a simple song, but at least the main riff is really catchy. Again, the build-up of the song is well supported by the production. The ending track 'No Stranger (Chapter VIII)' also shows the band throwing some creative multi-part songwriting in the mix, as well as ending the record with some powerful hard rock sounds. In the end I was pleasantly surprised about how much I enjoy this record and I will find myself a copy of 'Heads or Tales'.
 Trust by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 2006
3.81 | 189 ratings

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Trust
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

4 stars "Trust" would be Saga's 17 studio album and was released in 2006. This was during a time when Saga's albums were kind of hit and miss with some of them being really good and others seeming to lack something. This might make them sound like they are inconsistent, but they really aren't at this point. Sure they had their classic albums of the 70's that almost everyone loves, then they had the mediocre and not so great albums of the 80's where they tried hard to fit in to the popular sound, but could never really break into the super-stardom they were searching for. Then they released their masterpiece in 1995, "Generation 13" and ever since then, they have had their ups and downs as far as the quality of the music on their albums. "Trust" is one of those that sits in the really great album category, but not a masterpiece of prog. However, it is one that should be considered one of their best.

Michael Sadler is one of those sometimes over-the-top pomp singers and has the voice for it. The problem is, the band's style doesn't fit well with mainstream radio pop. They are much too talented for that. On the other hand, with Sadler's voice being unique and with Ian Crichton and Jim Gilmore having their own unique styles, the large quantity of songs and albums can start to get a little blurry and unfortunately don't have a lot of emotional variance, which has always been the band's biggest problem. But if you can get past that, the music is quite stellar on this album with only a few mediocre tracks, but with some really well-written songs that this time around end up moving the prog needle to the positive side of the spectrum several times. All of the musicians, including Sadler, give their share of memorable performances. The other thing that sets this album apart is the fact that it is the first album to feature new drummer Brian Doerner, formerly from the metal band "Helix", and this does bring a new level of excitement to the overall sound. He would end up staying with the band until 2012.

So, the band's spirit on this album seems to be much higher and it is apparent on most of the tracks like "Back in the Shadows", "Trust", "You Were Right" and "On the Other Side", among several others. The instrumental sections don't sound so worn out this time around, but it seems like the old spirit and enthusiasm is back. Sadler also tries some new effects with his vocals along with harmonics and that also helps set this apart. There is even a great ballad that stands out here called "My Friend". But there are a few weaker tracks that seem more like the more recent albums were the band (especially Sadler) seems bored like on "I'm Okay", "It's Your Life" and "Ice in the Rain". I think the problem on those tracks is the lack of melodic hooks in the vocal melody more than anything, and the band has suffered with that throughout their history. Luckily, these aren't terrible here on this album and are more of the exception than the rule for this record.

Overall, this is one of the lesser known Saga albums that shouldn't be passed up as readily as some of their others. It is an enjoyable record and the old spirit seems to be back more often on this record than on some of the others. I would rate it up there with one of their best, and as such, it gets a 4 star rating. It rises above the norm for the band more times than it doesn't.

 Generation 13 by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.94 | 177 ratings

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Generation 13
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by friso
Prog Reviewer

4 stars In the second halve of the nineties modern neo-progressive rock was reinvented by bands like Pallas, Arena, IQ, Pallas ánd Saga. WIth 'Generation 13' Saga released a concept album that is quite sophisticated and progressive compared to their often more crossover prog style. The band leans on the work of Pink Floyd's The Wall when it comes to how varied and psychedelic a concept album should be. Furthermore, the band tries to portray it's own troubled generation here. The album has a slightly vague and dated production that does give it a very distinct neo-prog atmosphere. The guitars of Ian Crichton are great as usual and he plays some of his best riffs on this album (take for instance the main theme 'Generation 13'). Vocalist Michael Sadler sounds a bit less 'pumpin' on this album, more refined I would say. I can also hear some influences of nineties alternative rock on this album. This is the type of concept album that launches different styles of songs in quick succession (symphonic, rock, psychedelic, spacey, folky) and throws around some reprises as well. For instance; a song like 'Danger Whistle' starts like psychedelic folk song, changes into a spacey symphonic track and ends up in a horror-type of film music. It is followed by a psychedelic funky snippet before entering the neo-prog classic title song. There are strange vocal effects and spoken word snippets all over the place and I'm guessing some listeners aren't too happy about it. I must admit that at first I though this album had some great tracks hidden between quite a lot of semi- interesting psychedelic fluff, but the album can grown on you I found. Like most neo-prog it is distinctly hard to 'get into' if you are not already a great fan of the genre. 'Generation 13' is a sort of minor masterpiece of the neo-prog genre and a bold move that might just have inspired groups like IQ and Arena to start working on their own concept albums later in this decade. A remixed / remastered version of this on a double vinyl would be nice (hint to record industry)!
 Images at Twilight by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 1979
3.25 | 244 ratings

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Images at Twilight
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin

3 stars Released in 1979, Saga's 2nd album "Images at Twilight" is usually considered the weaker of the band's first trilogy of albums. Being a new band, they were still looking for their new sound, wanting to incorporate some progressive aspects, but finding themselves coming into an era of change in the music business. One of the things I admire about the band during this time, is that they tried to stay close to their roots while also trying to fit in to the new sound that was emerging with synth heavy music. Well, they did quite well here, but you can tell for the most part, that the synth parts in this album don't seem quite as mature as they would by the time they released their breakthrough album "Worlds Apart" a few years later.

Another impressive thing about Saga is the 3 person core of the band that has, for the most part, stuck together through the years: Michael Sadler on the vocals and who also is more active on the synths for this album, Ian Crichton on guitars and Jim Crichton on bass (and bass synth on this album). Steve Negus on drums and percussion also remains from the debut album and would be with the band for a total of 26 years. At this point, newcomer Greg Chadd is responsible for most of the keyboards and synths, and, as evidenced in this album, his synth style is not the signature style that Saga is known for, but is more straightforward. His sound may have seemed to be a good fit for this new sound that was coming out, but it wasn't the sound that would put the band over the top. Chadd would also not appear on any other album as he would be replaced by Jim Gilmour, the keyboardist that ended up being another staple of the band and, except for a brief time, would remain with the band until present day.

So, as far as the signature sound of Saga, the sound that would make them famous, "Images at Twilight" doesn't quite give you that satisfaction that the band would become famous for. The synths are just too typical, however, the guitar is quickly moving towards that sound. This is very evident in the tracks "You're Not Alone" and "Hot to Cold", and listeners will hear a foreshadowing of their breakout album "Worlds Apart" in these tracks, as long as you close your ears to the plain sounding synths.

However, the synths are not too terrible here, just not what you expect. The bright and cheery sound of the heavy synths in "It's Time (Chapter Three)" actually work well for the track as well as "Images (Chapter One)" and "Mouse in a Maze". However, where it lacks is in the weaker tracks which really tends to drag the album down further than they should; "See Them Smile", "Slow Motion" and "Take It or Leave It". These three tracks have no progressiveness to them and sound like they could have easily come from the 80's. They are, thank goodness, shorter songs, but they are also way too radio friendly and uninteresting. The stronger songs "You're Not Alone" and "Hot to Cold" should easily make up for the weaker songs, and the others are good enough to not influence the album in a bad way ("Mouse in a Maze" and both of the Chapter tracks). Even so, the progressive aspect of the album is a bit weaker here, though not missing altogether. Those weak tracks are just almost unbearable and bring down the total rating more than they should.

I could easily rate this at a 3.5 star album, not as bad as their worst, a bit better than mediocre, but not necessarily excellent and far from essential. In the end, I have to round it down to 3 stars, but I wouldn't necessarily avoid this one as it is still pretty good for the most part. It's not one that I would enter the Saga realm with though. Better than good, but not quite great either. Get it for the Chapter tracks and the other 2 strong tracks.

 Saga by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.68 | 251 ratings

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Saga
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by Menswear
Prog Reviewer

3 stars If I were a teen in 1978....

I would've been flabbergasted by this album. Simply put, Saga is an original band: Ian Crichton sounds like thunder and lightnin' on guitar, Jim Crichton is absolutely bonkers on keyboards and Sadler is singing in his own dramatic style. The moogs are omnipresent and thick, and they are duelling with the guitar solos in the Saga trademark way,...so what's not to like?

Well, it didn't age pretty well. There's the problem with the cutting-edge-technology-albums: it's too much of l'air du temps, perhaps wanting too much to be innovative, too rooted in the zeitgeist. The first Van Halen, Police, Cars and Devo albums all came to life in 1978 and Saga's debut is easily the corniest of them all. I guess the Toto/Triumph/Styx/Kansas FM friendly format generates more laughs than praise as the years go by.

Saga were sonically fully themselves and top musicians yet from their 1978 start. Songs like Humble Stance and Ice Nice is showing off their spectacular abilities; man, could the Crichton brothers be the Canadian equivalent of the Van Halen brothers? They are tragically talented and they can dabble with pop also: the first track keyboard line sounds like Human League's Don't You Want Me!

To me, Saga is one of the shamefully overlooked band in Rock History and worthy of rediscovering compared to gimmicky lesser talented acts of that era (*cough*Kiss) who had nothing to say.

My job is done here.

 Generation 13 by SAGA album cover Studio Album, 1995
3.94 | 177 ratings

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Generation 13
Saga Crossover Prog

Review by Menswear
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Too late to the party.

In 1995, lots of musical wonders were born (Monster by R.E.M. or Mellon Collie by Smashing Pumpkins for instance) but my favorite had to be the Britpop wave. With Oasis, Blur, Pulp, Supergrass and Elastica, I didn't wanna hear about anything else but post- Nirvana bands. And I'm not the only one apparently because this album flew under our college radar.

Concept albums are a-plenty in the deep core of the prog world, but Saga flirts with the FM borderline. So a concept album from them is surprising; am I wrong or it's their only one? Anyhoo, the Operation Mindcrime or Streets Rock Opera were far behind, making this album (very) late to the party. But guess what? It holds the road surprisingly well! I'm really shocked by the many qualities of Generation 13.

Complex Generation X story with many characters, noise tricks/samples/special fx, catchy hooks, symphonic keyboards, rocking guitars, a good dose of humor....pretty much everything that made The Wall a success when you think of it. Great cinematics put into a coherent and entertaining package, I didn't felt bored at all, not once.

Usually, Saga makes bombastic, dynamic, colorful songs with no time to breathe. It's a welcoming change of season with Adler's vocals being less dramatic (phew!), slower/quieter segments and an enhanced sense cinematic grandeur.

Not your usual Saga, almost sounds like a different band!

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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