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CARAVAN

Canterbury Scene • United Kingdom


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Caravan picture
Caravan biography
Formed in 1968 in Canterbury, UK - Disbanded in 1978 - Reformed several times (1980-85, 90-92 and since 1995)

CARAVAN were the other half of the WILDE FLOWERS - the SOFT MACHINE being the other - that originated in Canterbury, Kent. The band itself was originally formed in early 1968 by guitarist/vocalist Pye HASTINGS, keyboardist Dave SINCLAIR , bassist/vocalist Richard SINCLAIR (later of HATFIELD & THE NORTH, NATIONAL HEALTH, etc.), and drummer Richard COUGHLAN. All four members of CARAVAN were, at one time or another, in that band. They were a leading exponent of what became known as "the Canterbury sound".

The band's 1968 self-titled debut was a hybrid of jazz and psychedelia. Things became serious with the second album, "If I Could Do It All Over Again,I'd Do It All Over You" and would mark the start of their classic period. The material was a very original mixture of styles including classical, jazz, and traditional English influences. A MILESTONE IN THEIR HISTORY. This recipe was used to great success on the next album, "In the Land of Grey and Pink". This album was a perfect blend between simple northern-English pop and complex progressive rock. Quite simply one of the greatest progressive rock classics. The style dominated the next album, "Waterloo Lily", released in May of 1972, which marked a clear step towards jazz. Yet, Richard SINCLAIR's influence was clearly apparent on the first side. "For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night" marked another change in the band's sound, this time towards a more streamlined symphonic approach. This album is not a bad album taken by itself, but the classic Canterbury sound stopped here. For a more representative look at CARAVAN in their prime, check out the preceding three albums. This lineup also recorded the live album "Caravan and the New Symphonia", a live 1973 performance accompanied by a full orchestra.

"Cunning Stunts" (1975) marked the beginning of a series of mediocre releases and lineup changes, eventually leading to the reunion of the original members on "Back to Front". Many different compilations and live albums were released in the intervening twelve years before a new studio album, "Battle...
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CARAVAN discography


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CARAVAN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.68 | 561 ratings
Caravan
1968
4.24 | 1103 ratings
If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You
1970
4.30 | 1855 ratings
In the Land of Grey and Pink
1971
3.77 | 608 ratings
Waterloo Lily
1972
4.16 | 805 ratings
For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night
1973
3.16 | 370 ratings
Cunning Stunts
1975
3.29 | 267 ratings
Blind Dog At St. Dunstans
1976
2.89 | 169 ratings
Better by Far
1977
2.30 | 134 ratings
The Album
1980
2.61 | 134 ratings
Back to Front
1982
2.84 | 134 ratings
The Battle of Hastings
1995
3.34 | 135 ratings
The Unauthorised Breakfast Item
2003
3.12 | 100 ratings
Paradise Filter
2013
3.06 | 18 ratings
The Back Catalogue Songs
2014
0.00 | 0 ratings
It's None of Your Business
2021

CARAVAN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.94 | 206 ratings
Caravan & The New Symphonia
1974
3.62 | 27 ratings
The Best of Caravan "Live"
1980
3.18 | 15 ratings
Show of Our Lives
1981
3.41 | 44 ratings
BBC Radio 1 Live in Concert
1991
2.86 | 25 ratings
Live 1990
1993
3.81 | 17 ratings
Live: Canterbury Comes to London
1997
3.64 | 11 ratings
Back On The Tracks
1998
3.62 | 21 ratings
Ether Way: BBC Sessions 1975-77
1998
3.03 | 18 ratings
Surprise Supplies [Aka: Here Am I]
1999
3.18 | 13 ratings
Green Bottles For Marjorie
2002
4.46 | 121 ratings
Live At Fairfield Halls - 1974
2002
3.91 | 19 ratings
Live UK Tour 1975
2003
3.11 | 9 ratings
Nowhere to Hide
2003
3.17 | 16 ratings
Live in Nottingham
2003
2.67 | 6 ratings
With Strings Attached
2003
4.22 | 58 ratings
The Show Of Our Lives: Caravan At The BBC 1968-1975
2007
2.50 | 18 ratings
A Hunting We Shall Go: Live in 1974
2008
2.67 | 9 ratings
The European Tour 2011: Live At Shepherds Bush Empire
2012
0.00 | 0 ratings
Live in Concert at Metropolis Studios, London
2012

CARAVAN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.39 | 23 ratings
Classic Rock Legends (DVD)
2001
2.50 | 13 ratings
A Knight In London
2003
3.84 | 19 ratings
A Night's Tale: Live In The USA
2004
4.20 | 15 ratings
Caravan - The 35th Anniversary Concert
2005
2.91 | 8 ratings
The Anthology/The Ultimate Anthology
2007
3.33 | 3 ratings
Classic Rock Legends: Caravan Live At Metropolis Studios
2011
3.00 | 3 ratings
Live At Rosfest Gettysburg USA
2014

CARAVAN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
The Best Of Caravan: From 1970-1974
1974
4.00 | 1 ratings
This Is Caravan
1974
3.00 | 1 ratings
Dos
1976
4.22 | 23 ratings
Canterbury Tales - The Best of Caravan
1976
0.00 | 0 ratings
Caravan (Compilation)
1979
2.14 | 5 ratings
The Canterbury Collection
1984
0.00 | 0 ratings
And I Wish I Were Stoned Don't Worry
1985
0.00 | 0 ratings
Songs And Signs
1991
4.09 | 7 ratings
The Best Of Caravan
1993
3.75 | 35 ratings
Canterbury Tales: The Best Of Caravan 1968-1975
1994
2.35 | 22 ratings
Cool Water
1994
3.22 | 20 ratings
All Over You
1997
3.00 | 2 ratings
Travelling Man
1998
3.29 | 19 ratings
Songs For Oblivion Fishermen
1998
3.39 | 17 ratings
All Over You ... Too
1999
3.05 | 3 ratings
Headloss
1999
3.00 | 2 ratings
The HTD Years
2000
3.16 | 12 ratings
Where But For Caravan Would I?
2000
2.26 | 8 ratings
Travelling Ways
2002
4.93 | 31 ratings
The World Is Yours - The Anthology 1968-1976
2010
3.00 | 3 ratings
Place of My Own: The Collection
2014

CARAVAN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.29 | 9 ratings
Place of My Own
1969
4.10 | 10 ratings
Hello, Hello
1970
3.75 | 4 ratings
If I Could Do It All Over Again I'd Do It All Over You
1970
3.45 | 12 ratings
Golf Girl
1971
3.50 | 6 ratings
Love to Love You
1971
3.33 | 3 ratings
A Hunting We Shall Go
1974
3.00 | 2 ratings
Headloss
1974
3.07 | 5 ratings
Stuck in a Hole
1975
3.50 | 2 ratings
All The Way
1976
2.75 | 4 ratings
Better By Far
1977
3.75 | 4 ratings
Heartbreaker
1980
3.50 | 2 ratings
Keepin' Up De Fences
1980

CARAVAN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Back to Front by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1982
2.61 | 134 ratings

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Back to Front
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Caravan's Back To Front is notable because it's the reunion album - the original quartet of Richard and Dave Sinclair, Richard Coughlan, and Pye Hastings got back together (Hastings and Coughlan having been the only consistent members of the band since beginning) and assembled a studio album for the first time since In the Land of Grey and Pink - and alas, with the death of Coughlan in 2013, it would prove to be the last time.

The long-absent Richard even gets to lead off the album with one of his songs - Back To Herne Bay Front, a gentle pop- ish number about a visit to the seaside - but anyone hoping to get back to that grey and pink land of yore would be disappointed by this. In keeping with recent Caravan albums, this is something of a pop-prog release rather than a prog-oriented thing; the band hadn't put together a truly epic track since the Grubby Little Oik suite on Blind Dog At St Dunstans', and show no intention of doing so here.

In some respects, this allows for a nice level of stylistic range - the album sounds even more diverse than The Album in this respect - since in effect each band member is contributing their own songs and doesn't seem to feel obliged to stick too close to a single defined sound. That said, the group members' musical trajectories more or less work together. Just as Caravan had been in a pop-prog vein for a good while now, Richard Sinclair had been onboard for some of Camel's more successful attempts at pop-prog blends (and indeed Dave Sinclair had also joined Camel for Breathless).

It makes sense, then, that for this reunion album the group members would contribute songs in this sort of pop-prog vein: if you've found common ground after so long apart from each other, concentrating on that is just sensible. And to be fair, from their debut album to songs like Golf Girl, the original Caravan lineup had included a dose of pop sensibilities into their formula right from the start. Still, I can see why fans for whom the long, epic Caravan workouts were the point of the exercise would find little to enjoy here (though the closing number of Proper Job/Back to Front attains some of the climactic drama that classic Caravan were so good at).

For my part, I think this is just as charming a prog-pop album as, say, Camel's Raindances or Breathless, which thanks to the presence of Richard Sinclair's voice this would make a great companion piece to. Adding Mel Collins on sax for the wistful Visions of Hollywood just makes it all the better (and makes the Camel comparisons all the more apt).

 The Album by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1980
2.30 | 134 ratings

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The Album
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars After Better By Far was at best ignored, at worst reviled, Caravan took a nap for the rest of the 1970s and woke up again to star a brief 1980s run with The Album. On the plus side, it does seem to be a logical continuation of the approach of Better By Far - on the down side, that's an approach which will turn off many fans of classic Caravan.

Simply put, if you're into Caravan for the prog epics... well, they aren't here, the band having apparently decided that the Grubby Little Oik suite on Blind Dog At St. Dunstans' was the last hurrah for that side of their songwriting. That isn't to say there's nothing here with a touch of prog about it - Piano Player, in particular, is a nice bit of prog- pop - but Caravan seem to be splitting their time between lighthearted soft rock (usually in a laid-back mode, though uptempo album closer Keepin' Up De Fences is a real banger) and Caravan-style novelty songs (the latter represented by the jaunty Make Yourself At Home.

They even break out into a bit of reggae on Clear Blue Sky, but I actually found that song more impressive than I was expecting it to be. Yes, it's a stylistic left turn, but I'd been dreading listening to it for the first time, fearing it would be a badly-dated parody number (possibly delivered with a somewhat racist-sounding parody of a Jamaican accent). Luckily, it was nothing of the sort - indeed, it seemed to be a serious-minded stab at the style, the sort of thing which I don't think you could really pull off unless you had a sincere respect for the source material, with Pye's guitar solos making me think the idea of a prog-reggae crossover isn't necessarily a recipe for disaster.

So really, the isn't bad - yes, this is Caravan doing 10CC (with perhaps a pinch of Supertramp, or a nod to what Camel were doing around this era), but it turns out they're alright at it - but it certainly won't scratch the itch if you were more in the mood for In the Land of Grey and Pink or If I Could Do it All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You.

One begins to suspect that Caravan at this point weren't feeling all that inspired in the studio, but needed to knock out a studio album to bankroll their live endeavours - but this album isn't horribly incompetent, and in fact I can see myself deliberately putting it on if I were in the right mood. But it wouldn't be a "Caravan" or Canterbury prog mood - it'd be a prog-pop mood, because this is the sort of thing which is only fun if you like mixing both, but awful if you dislike getting pop in your prog (or prog in your pop).

However, if you do like your prog-pop mashups, Caravan are damn good at it. I'd even put this head and shoulders above Better By Far - taking a bit of time off seems to have recharged the group's batteries, to the benefit of the music.

 Better by Far by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1977
2.89 | 169 ratings

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Better by Far
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars Caravan's Better By Far is easily the least loved of their 1970s studio releases - Cunning Stunts and Blind Dog At St. Dunstan's both, to my eyes, seem to have more enthusiastic defenders than this one.

For my part, I think it's fine - but not more than fine. Here, Caravan's evolution from being a keystone of the Canterbury prog scene to a slickly produced progressive pop unit is complete - Tony Visconti's even here behind the production desk, and for my part I think he manages to handle the material deftly and invest it with a bit more warmth than was evident on Blind Dog.

This is useful, because the material here is not quite as interesting. It's hard to deny that a lot of Caravan's distinctive musical personality has drained away by this point - though twinklings of their whimsical sense of humour are still in evidence in the lyrics - and what's left behind is melodic soft rock with progressive leanings.

For my part, I actually quite like Better By Far - particularly closing track Nightmare, a highlight of the album highlight of the album and one of the few numbers from it which would pop up on Caravan live setlists in later years. The material here feels like it sits well alongside the sort of thing Camel were doing at around this time - Pye's closing guitar solo on Nightmare in particular feels like something Andy Latimer would have whipped out. These parallels are especially apt because this would have been when Caravan co-founder Richard Sinclair was with Camel. Indeed, Jan Schelhaas would go on from here to join Camel in 1978, during the time when Caravan took a little rest.

Perhaps Better By Far is evidence that the hiatus was well-timed. Though ultimately quite pleasant, there's also not much on here beyond Nightmare which truly stands out from the pack. And if the poppier direction of the album was a bid for commercial success, it was truly horrendously timed, because the hot new thing on the market - punk - broke right just as the album was coming out.

Sure, if you're in the mood for sophisticated progressive pop you're not going to spurn Better By Far for a spin of the Damned's debut album - but audiences were spoiled for choice when it came for sophisticated, smooth, well- produced pop-rock at around this time, whilst punk was something fresh and new. The terrible commercial performance of the album is all too easy to explain. But its crummy critical reception is a little less justified.

Granted, if you only care about Caravan's most progressive and ground-breaking work, there's nothing for you here - but you had pretty damn slim pickings on Cunning Stunts or Blind Dog, for that matter. And if their soothing pop side, something present in their sound since their debut, has some appeal to you, then Better By Far is a reasonable outing of that, though I'd still say of the 1970s prog-pop triptych of Cunning Stunts, Blind Dog At St. Dunstans, and Better By Far, I'd call Blind Dog the mutts' nuts.

 Surprise Supplies [Aka: Here Am I] by CARAVAN album cover Live, 1999
3.03 | 18 ratings

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Surprise Supplies [Aka: Here Am I]
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This is something of an "official bootleg" in Caravan's discography, since a soundboard tape of this show had circulated for a while before a nicely tidied-up version came out via HTD. It would later be rereleased by various outfits, including under the title Here Am I: its most recent rerelease is on the career-spanning megabox Who Do We Think We Are?

It's an apt choice to turn into an official release, though, because as well as decent sound quality it offers something rather different to most Caravan live releases. Hailing as it does from the Blind Dog At St. Dunstans tour, it offers live renditions of almost the whole album - the sole missing song being Jack and Jill, and the only earlier material being a rendition of The Love In Your Eye.

This is a bit of a revelation, because Blind Dog is a rather critically snubbed release in the Caravan discography - perhaps because it continued the poppier direction of Cunning Stunts, as well as a somewhat plastic, cold production job which lacked the warmth and authenticity of earlier Caravan albums. Here, the live energy added to the compositions really helps, and set next to The Love In Your Eye they don't feel like quite such a major departure as their studio renditions may have seemed in isolation.

As such, Surprise Supplies offers an interesting alternative look at where Caravan was at in 1976 which much indeed surprise listeners who found their studio efforts from that year underwhelming.

 Blind Dog At St. Dunstans by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1976
3.29 | 267 ratings

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Blind Dog At St. Dunstans
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Cunning Stunts was a Caravan album which took a long time to grow on me, and now I've finally gotten around to visiting Caravan's Blind Dog At St. Dunstans I think I understand why. You see, Cunning Stunts was a transitional album - marking more or less the mid-point of the band's shift from the more resolutely prog-oriented style of their early albums to a more progressive pop style. (Early echoes of this can be heard on For Girls Who Grow Plump In the Night.) In retrospect, it's no surprise Cunning Stunts ends up being a little awkward.

If you only care about the Canterbury prog side of Caravan and find their prog-pop dimension undesirable, you'll find this album a bit of a dog's breakfast... but I actually like it more than Cunning Stunts. Having more firmly committed to the new direction, the band have a decent stab at it, and whilst I found that the pop aspects of Cunning Stunts have dated a little poorly, there's a charm to Blind Dog which I find quite endearing.

The jazzier side of Caravan isn't wholly absent, but is largely turned to coming up with engaging hooks, and as far as longer pieces go the "Grubby Little Oik" suite is rather fun. Really, I think the album's biggest problem - and the aspect which probably turns off more listeners than any other aspect of the package here - is the production.

Don't get me wrong - David Hitchcock, the band's long-running producer since In the Land of Grey and Pink, does a perfectly technically competent job here. That said, I think - in keeping with the general goals of the album - he ended up turning in a rather plasticy, over-polished, slightly cold production job, which doesn't tease out the warmth of the material as well as his work on earlier albums. (Come to think of it, this slightly plastic production also affects Cunning Stunts.)

In retrospect it's no surprise that this was a bit of a commercial and critical flop at the time - come 1976 the nation was primed for something rawer and angrier, with the punk wave just about to break. Nonetheless, I don't think it's any sort of cataclysmic career misstep so much as it represents the full flowering of the style which Caravan were workshopping on Cunning Stunts. I think it ends up being the better album of the two as a result - but at the same time, the style that they're going for here isn't for everyone, even if you're a fan of their earlier stuff.

 Live UK Tour 1975 by CARAVAN album cover Live, 2003
3.91 | 19 ratings

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Live UK Tour 1975
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

4 stars This is a concert from the Cunning Stunts tour, with Jan Schelhaas newly arriving on keyboards. Capturing the band shortly before they knuckled down to record Blind Dog At St. Dunstans', it's an artifact of an era when the conventional wisdom is that Caravan were turning away from prog and taking their sound in a more pop direction.

Whilst that might have been true in the studio, the track listing here tells a more complicated story: after the opening Show Of Our Lives, the remainder of the set consists of epic tracks - nothing less than 9 minutes, in fact - so and there's little doubt from the performances here that the band's prog component.

I wouldn't put this on the level of Live At the Fairfield Halls - which has a lot of overlap here - but getting a live rendition of The Dabsong Conshirtoe when it was still fresh is nice. Collectors may wish to note that this show is included in remastered form on the Who Do We Think We Are? boxed set - but if that's too rich for your tastes and you can pick this up at a reasonable choice, I'd say it's a pretty reasonable addition to a Caravan collection, and is certainly evidence that the band still had their old magic during this time period.

 A Hunting We Shall Go: Live in 1974 by CARAVAN album cover Live, 2008
2.50 | 18 ratings

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A Hunting We Shall Go: Live in 1974
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

3 stars This live release - it's over half an hour long but only three tracks, so might be better thought of as a long EP rather than a full album - is sourced from a radio broadcast from Caravan's 1974 North American tour. It's a perfectly solid selection of Caravan tunes, but at the same time between Live at the Fairfield Halls and Caravan & the New Symphonia we're already pretty well-served for live Caravan material of this general vintage - indeed, all three of these tracks are represented on both of those releases (if you go with the expanded version of New Symphonia - which I personally recommend).

As such, whilst this selection is perfectly pleasant (and the version of For Richard here is magnificent), this is rather inessential. I certainly wouldn't think it's necessarily worth tracking down on its own unless you simply can't get enough live Caravan - and if that's the case, then you'd be better off saving your pennies for the Who Do We Think We Are? boxed set, which not only includes this but also has a range of other, arguably more interesting live treasures to offer up.

 Caravan by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.68 | 561 ratings

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Caravan
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Paprizio

5 stars HUMBLE BEGINNINGS.

Let it be known, Let the whole world know, that the only negative point of this record is the quality of the recording, newer releases with remastered audio came out, but there's so much you can do to bad recording, even so that they did what many albums of that period of time are done when remastered, two versions of the same album (which I happen to own), one in stereo and one in mono, enough said that because at that time people wasn't aware that stereo would be the norm in the future the record wasn't thought to be listen in it, so yes it's better in mono, however just because of my love for this album I listen to both versions as if it was one.

Here we have the beginnings of a great band, the change is so obvious to the rest of the discography, in fact the only bonus track, a single version of Hello Hello from the next album makes this so much more apparent, the sound here is much more psychodelic than Jazz, no doubt we are still in the '60 and this sound was the beginning of prog, all the band members that would still play in subsequent albums are present and fresh, special mention to David who brings this whole thing together, sadly Richard bass is not as loud as I would like because of the mixing, but it's still memorable, many of the things for what Caravan would be know for started here, the solos, the humour, the performance, it's an important piece in prog and for that I cannot give this less than 5 stars.

 Waterloo Lily by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.77 | 608 ratings

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Waterloo Lily
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by prog_traveller!!

4 stars After the climax reached with In the Land of Gray and Pink, the descent of the Caravan inevitably began: the decisive was, without doubt, the premature abandonment of Dave Sinclair, who reached his friend Robert Wyatt first in the sessions of Ear and then in Matching Mole, being replaced by Steve Miller (brother of guitarist Phil), a jazz pianist with milder inclinations than the daring former keyboard player; Miller - unlike his predecessor, who played mainly the Hammond organ, but also the piano and melotron - definitely preferred the electric piano. Its sound gave Caravan's music a more jazzy character.

This can be heard mainly on the example of the extensive, instrumental composition "Nothing at All / It's Coming Soon / Nothing at All (Reprise)", clearly inspired by fusion music. In addition to the electric piano, the funky bass lines of Richard Sinclair and the guest parts of two other Delivery members - saxophonist Lola Coxhill and guitarist Phil Miller play an important role here. This is one of the most interesting songs in the group's output. The second, extended composition, "The Love in Your Eye / To Catch Me a Brother / Subsultus / Debouchement / Tilbury Kecks", is by no means inferior, also showing jazz and funk influences, and distinguished by a neatly orchestrated beginning. The vocal fragments attract attention with a nice melodic line, and the instrumental ones delight with the musicians' performances, the most thrilling of which is the solo of the group's permanent associate, Jimmy Hastings, on the flute. The rest of the album is more song-like. Unfortunately, leaving mixed feelings.

The title composition that opens the whole thing is very pleasant. Neat melodic, running away from predictable structure and quite heavy for this band. In Waterloo Lily the rock component suffers the most, largely set aside in favor of a much more flexible jazz.

 In the Land of Grey and Pink by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.30 | 1855 ratings

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In the Land of Grey and Pink
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by prog_traveller!!

5 stars Behind this floral and colorful creature are the four members of the group: the underrated Richard Sinclair, singer and bassist with a rare taste for melody, his cousin David Sinclair, blues keyboardist and leader of the group, guitarist Pye Hastings. A separate chapter deserves Richard Coughlan, drummer of the group: among the few in the jazz-rock field to develop a synthesis between rock rhythms and jazz touch, rather than the other way around. Then there is the support of Jimmy Hastings on winds, especially sax and flute, and of producer David Hitchcock. Music of an angelic beauty, dreamy and perfect melodies. And the voice, I've never heard anything so gentle and soft on a rock record. In the Land of Gray and Pink is a classic not only in sounds, but also in the format on which the album is set. In fact, on the first side of the disc we find the four shorter and leaner tracks, while the second part is entirely occupied by Nine Feet Underground, a mammoth twenty-two minute suite that can be considered as the summa of the British quartet's sound.

The album starts uncharacteristically for prog-rock, because of a short and sober solo of what is probably a trumpet, from which the Golf Girl grows, a catchy song, punctuated by a long instrumental segment with a stifled melotron and a swift, slippery flute. It is one of those songs that will press on your lips when you just feel the need to whistle. The next track is the delicate "Winter wine", which has its best outlet in the melodic moment; After a one-minute acoustic picture, the bass entry triggers the ride. The instrument not only provides the groove, but also outlines the melodic texture of the piece, on which the electric organ and occasional piano interventions place further embroidery.

Love to love you (And tonight pigs will fly)", certainly is the most banal piece of the album but still with significant moments, especially the final flute solo. The fourth track "In the land of gray and pink" fully reflects the humor of the group, with apparently nonsense lyrics. The interludes of piano and wind instruments are remarkable

Nine Feet Underground is the masterpiece of the album, it is the artistic zenith of Caravan and one of the most representative suites in the progressive rock field. It represents 22.44 minutes of pure musical ecstasy. The entire track is developed around the work of David Sinclair, here in great dust both on a strictly technical level and in terms of compositional taste. His particularly long and elaborate solo interventions are never boring, on the contrary, they sound agile and liquid. The song flows quickly, alternating valuable instrumental sections, halfway between jazz technique and caressing folk references, with two sung sections.

With Nine Feet Underground - but more generally with In the Land Of Gray and Pink - the Caravan demonstrated all their technical and compositional skills by expanding and perfecting a personal style, jazzy but not frigid, romantic and ironic, psychedelic and colorful, but equally lucid and reasoned in every arrangement. They succeeded in having a complex and at the same time easily assimilable sound, refined but not excessively bizarre.

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