Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

CARAVAN

Canterbury Scene • United Kingdom


From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

Caravan picture
Caravan biography
Formed in 1968 in Canterbury, UK - Disbanded in 1978 - Reformed several times (1980-85, 90-92 and since 1995)

CARAVAN were the other half of the WILDE FLOWERS - the SOFT MACHINE being the other - that originated in Canterbury, Kent. The band itself was originally formed in early 1968 by guitarist/vocalist Pye HASTINGS, keyboardist Dave SINCLAIR , bassist/vocalist Richard SINCLAIR (later of HATFIELD & THE NORTH, NATIONAL HEALTH, etc.), and drummer Richard COUGHLAN. All four members of CARAVAN were, at one time or another, in that band. They were a leading exponent of what became known as "the Canterbury sound".

The band's 1968 self-titled debut was a hybrid of jazz and psychedelia. Things became serious with the second album, "If I Could Do It All Over Again,I'd Do It All Over You" and would mark the start of their classic period. The material was a very original mixture of styles including classical, jazz, and traditional English influences. A MILESTONE IN THEIR HISTORY. This recipe was used to great success on the next album, "In the Land of Grey and Pink". This album was a perfect blend between simple northern-English pop and complex progressive rock. Quite simply one of the greatest progressive rock classics. The style dominated the next album, "Waterloo Lily", released in May of 1972, which marked a clear step towards jazz. Yet, Richard SINCLAIR's influence was clearly apparent on the first side. "For Girls Who Grow Plump in the Night" marked another change in the band's sound, this time towards a more streamlined symphonic approach. This album is not a bad album taken by itself, but the classic Canterbury sound stopped here. For a more representative look at CARAVAN in their prime, check out the preceding three albums. This lineup also recorded the live album "Caravan and the New Symphonia", a live 1973 performance accompanied by a full orchestra.

"Cunning Stunts" (1975) marked the beginning of a series of mediocre releases and lineup changes, eventually leading to the reunion of the original members on "Back to Front". Many different compilations and live albums were released in the intervening twelve years before a new studio album, "Battle...
read more

CARAVAN forum topics / tours, shows & news


CARAVAN forum topics Create a topic now
CARAVAN tours, shows & news Post an entries now

CARAVAN Videos (YouTube and more)


Showing only random 3 | Show all CARAVAN videos (2) | Search and add more videos to CARAVAN

Buy CARAVAN Music


In the Land of Grey & PinkIn the Land of Grey & Pink
Remastered
Polygram Uk 2005
$6.01
$3.99 (used)
Waterloo LilyWaterloo Lily
Reissued · Remastered
Polygram Uk 2001
$6.01
$4.25 (used)
If I Could Do It All Over Again I'd Do ItIf I Could Do It All Over Again I'd Do It
Remastered
Polygram Uk 2001
$5.75
$4.24 (used)
Plump In The Night - CaravanPlump In The Night - Caravan
Remastered
Polygram Uk 2005
$6.01
$3.38 (used)

More places to buy CARAVAN music online Buy CARAVAN & Prog Rock Digital Music online:

CARAVAN discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

CARAVAN top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.70 | 515 ratings
Caravan
1968
4.25 | 1017 ratings
If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You
1970
4.29 | 1723 ratings
In The Land Of Grey And Pink
1971
3.77 | 549 ratings
Waterloo Lily
1972
4.18 | 727 ratings
For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night
1973
3.15 | 336 ratings
Cunning Stunts
1975
3.25 | 236 ratings
Blind Dog At St. Dunstans
1976
2.86 | 148 ratings
Better By Far
1977
2.17 | 120 ratings
The Album
1980
2.46 | 117 ratings
Back To Front
1982
2.81 | 120 ratings
The Battle Of Hastings
1995
3.37 | 119 ratings
The Unauthorised Breakfast Item
2003
3.08 | 87 ratings
Paradise Filter
2013
3.00 | 15 ratings
The Back Catalogue Songs
2014

CARAVAN Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.92 | 189 ratings
Caravan & The New Symphonia
1974
3.57 | 23 ratings
The Best of Caravan "Live"
1980
3.13 | 13 ratings
Show of Our Lives
1981
3.41 | 42 ratings
BBC Radio 1 Live in Concert
1991
2.78 | 21 ratings
Live 1990
1993
3.73 | 14 ratings
Live: Canterbury Comes to London
1997
3.50 | 10 ratings
Back On The Tracks
1998
3.58 | 17 ratings
Ether Way: BBC Sessions 1975-77
1998
2.63 | 16 ratings
Surprise Supplies (AKA "Here I am")
1999
3.14 | 13 ratings
Green Bottles For Marjorie
2002
4.46 | 114 ratings
Live At Fairfield Halls - 1974
2002
3.85 | 17 ratings
Live UK Tour 1975
2003
3.11 | 9 ratings
Nowhere to Hide
2003
3.09 | 13 ratings
Live in Nottingham
2003
2.67 | 6 ratings
With Strings Attached
2003
4.22 | 53 ratings
The Show Of Our Lives: Caravan At The BBC 1968-1975
2007
2.31 | 17 ratings
A Hunting We Shall Go: Live In 1974
2008
2.67 | 9 ratings
The European Tour 2011: Live At Shepherds Bush Empire
2012

CARAVAN Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

3.38 | 22 ratings
Classic Rock Legends (DVD)
2001
2.50 | 13 ratings
A Knight In London
2003
3.83 | 17 ratings
A Night's Tale: Live In The USA
2004
4.00 | 12 ratings
Caravan - The 35th Anniversary Concert
2005
2.91 | 8 ratings
The Anthology/The Ultimate Anthology
2007
3.33 | 3 ratings
Classic Rock Legends: Caravan Live At Metropolis Studios
2011
3.00 | 3 ratings
Live At Rosfest Gettysburg USA
2014

CARAVAN Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.00 | 1 ratings
The Best Of Caravan: From 1970-1974
1974
4.00 | 1 ratings
This Is Caravan
1974
3.00 | 1 ratings
Dos
1976
4.21 | 21 ratings
Canterbury Tales - The Best of Caravan
1976
0.00 | 0 ratings
Caravan (Compilation)
1979
2.14 | 5 ratings
The Canterbury Collection
1984
0.00 | 0 ratings
And I Wish I Were Stoned Don't Worry
1985
0.00 | 0 ratings
Songs And Signs
1991
4.09 | 7 ratings
The Best Of Caravan
1993
3.75 | 33 ratings
Canterbury Tales: The Best Of Caravan 1968-1975
1994
2.32 | 20 ratings
Cool Water
1994
3.23 | 18 ratings
All Over You
1997
3.00 | 2 ratings
Travelling Man
1998
3.23 | 17 ratings
Songs For Oblivion Fishermen
1998
3.35 | 15 ratings
All Over You ... Too
1999
3.05 | 3 ratings
Headloss
1999
3.00 | 2 ratings
The HTD Years
2000
3.16 | 12 ratings
Where But For Caravan Would I?
2000
2.26 | 8 ratings
Travelling Ways
2002
4.94 | 27 ratings
The World Is Yours - The Anthology 1968-1976
2010
3.00 | 3 ratings
Place of My Own: The Collection
2014

CARAVAN Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.29 | 9 ratings
Place of My Own
1969
4.10 | 10 ratings
Hello, Hello
1970
3.75 | 4 ratings
If I Could Do It All Over Again I'd Do It All Over You
1970
3.18 | 9 ratings
Golf Girl
1971
3.50 | 6 ratings
Love to Love You
1971
3.33 | 3 ratings
A Hunting We Shall Go
1974
3.00 | 2 ratings
Headloss
1974
3.07 | 5 ratings
Stuck in a Hole
1975
3.50 | 2 ratings
All The Way
1976
2.75 | 4 ratings
Better By Far
1977
3.75 | 4 ratings
Heartbreaker
1980
3.50 | 2 ratings
Keepin' Up De Fences
1980

CARAVAN Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 The Show Of Our Lives: Caravan At The BBC 1968-1975 by CARAVAN album cover Live, 2007
4.22 | 53 ratings

BUY
The Show Of Our Lives: Caravan At The BBC 1968-1975
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by Warthur
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Be aware that this set comes in two versions: the standalone version subtitled "Caravan at the BBC 1968-1975" has two songs (Place of My Own) and Ride) from a 1968 session which aren't included on the version (subtitled "Caravan at the BBC 1970-1975") compiled in the recent Decca/Deram Years compilation boxed set. (Presumably this is because those songs didn't come out on Decca or Deram, but Verve.)

That said, I wouldn't cry too much over those tracks - fun gems from Caravan's 1968 debut album though they are, they're rather minor songs which quickly fell by the wayside in the wake of the far superior material which Caravan would develop from 1970 onwards. On either version of this set, you get comfortably over two hours of live/live-in-the- studio renditions of much of the band's best material, as well as the odd rarity - perhaps the biggest rarity here being a 9 minute take on Feelin' Reelin' Squealin', which was an early single put out by Caravan's chums Soft Machine.

Magnificently covering Caravan's evolution from underground eccentrics to one of the more polished of the second- tier 1970s prog acts (in the sense of commercial success - they never hit ELP levels of showbiz prominence, but musically speaking they were a top notch act), either version of The Show of Our Lives is excellent, not least for having the good taste to stop comfortably before the wheels ended up coming off of Caravan by the end of the decade.

 For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1973
4.18 | 727 ratings

BUY
For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by MaxPap

5 stars For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night is a unique experience from everything Caravan has made. There is something I realized when listening to "Waterloo Lily" and "If I Could Do It All Over Again...", and it's that the unusual-ness of some instrumental passages, which are all well-loved by I and other prog fanatics, can sometimes lead to usual-ness. That is not the case with this album.

I have to admit I was scared before first listen, because I had loved so much "In The Land of Grey and Pink" and Richard Sinclair's wonderful voice missing here had me lose a little hope. I was wrong, and I was pleasantly surprised by Pye Hastings' wonderful performance. Instead of having a competition between two singer-songwriters (ala Supertramp, or even The Beatles), it really feels like a group performing together harmoniously without separation being noticed. Some of the catchy-but-still-progressive choruses prove this, with multiple vocals coming in together: It really has a charm that is completely new to them. This is the first reason why I consider this album better than "In The Land of Grey And Pink".

The second reason is that it seems the band has now a maturity not known before. Grey and Pink was innocent, naive and beautiful; Plump in the Night is mature, majestic, graceful, splendid. They are both amazing for their own reasons. They are also very different! Plump in the Night has a focus on guitars, but also violin, and it really gives it a Folk feeling to it. The solo on "Hoedown", for example, could almost be danced to. Passages between harder progressive rock and softer folk-ish choruses make a refreshing feeling when mixed together, and this album is very good for that. Starting from the epic "Memory Lain, Hugh/Headloss", you can tell it has an unusual happy feeling while still proving to contain magical parts. Singing to the songs here proves the harmony of it. The band also does not fear to be a little offensive in the song "The Dog..." but even there they have a charming harmony while singing together.

The whole plot changes once you hit "L'Auberge Du Sanglier...". This ten-minute instrumental is not only the longest one on the album, but once you get past the rocking "A Hunting We Shall Go" part, we get one of the most beautiful and magic-invoking pieces in all of progressive rock. I'm a sucker for these, and naturally got blown away on my first listen (And pretty much all listens of it).

I could go on, but I think you got the point. This is a must-listen for all progressive rock fans, and even if you generally do not like Canterbury, this is arguably much closer to Symphonic prog than Grey and Pink. Now that I think about it, this album could be in my top ten favorite...

 Caravan by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1968
3.70 | 515 ratings

BUY
Caravan
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Review Nš 250

Caravan was one of the most formidable progressive rock acts to come out of England in the end of the 60's. Still, the band has never achieved the great success that was widely predicted for them at the beginning of their career. They were never much more than a very successful cult band at home, really. Apart from a brief moment in 1975, they were barely a cult band anywhere else in the world. They only ever charted one album in their first six years of activity, but they made a lot of noise in the English rock press, and their following fan base has been sufficiently loyal and wide to keep their work in print. But, despite all I said before, they were nevertheless considered a key part of the Canterbury scene, blending psychedelic rock, jazz and classical influences to create a very distinctive progressive rock sound.

"Caravan" is the eponymous debut studio album of Caravan and was released in 1968. The line up on the album is Pye Hastings (lead and backing vocals, guitars and bass guitars), David Sinclair (backing vocals, organ and piano), Richard Sinclair (lead vocals and backing vocals, guitars and bass guitars) and Richard Coughlan (drums). The album had also a participation of the brother of Pye Hastings, Jimmy Hastings (flute), as a guest musician.

"Caravan" has eight tracks. All tracks were written by Pye Hastings, David and Richard Sinclair and Coughlan. The first track "Place Of My Own" starts with a powerful intro and a sad, yearning, organ dominated motif, after which the fragile, almost childlike vocal of Pye Hastings intones a lyric and melody of the most heartfelt beauty. There's an instrumental passage on the song that features what just might be one of the most glorious organ solos on the album. Then, we have a perfect chorus again, quieter and more subdued, with a louder reprise. The second track "Ride" was built around a very 1968 eastern inspired melody line interspersed with loud instrumental breaks in which Richard Sinclair shows what a bass legend he truly is. The third track "Policeman" shows even more the pronounced vocal talent of Richard Sinclair. It's an early example of his perky, charming and very English compositional style that would grace the future works of Caravan. His cousin David shines, as always, on his mighty organ. The fourth track "Love Song With Flute" is another glorious Pye Hastings song. It has the hallmarks of Caravan's best songs, a slow minor keyed intro, a simple and divine vocal melody building up to a satisfying, resolving chorus with gospel like vocal harmonies and a big ever so slightly dischordant, crescendo. The track then moves with a lovely flute solo by the guest musician Jimmy Hastings. The fifth track "Cecil Rons" begins in free form. It evolves into a tone bass driven in one verse that alternates a nursery rhyme with manic exclamations and an atypically atonal vocal line from Pye Hastings. But, Caravan can never resist to the big chorus in an absolutely perfect contrast with the chaos around it. A kind of a waltz coda from totally different world closes the track, the like of which Caravan never attempted again on their following works. The sixth track "Magic Man" is a delicious and a very beautiful simple song in waltz time with a chorus you will never forget. It makes an amiable lyric reference to their Canterbury buddies, Soft Machine, and features David Sinclair at his very best. It represents the most beautiful moment on the album, a truly magic moment. The seventh track "Grandma's Lawn" represents Richard Sinclair's second showcase in terms of vocals. It's a big propulsive gem of a track in a similar vein to Syd Barrett's unreleased classic song "Vegetable Man". The echo effect on the vocals is just right for the cavernous general mood of the song. The eighth track "Where But For Caravan Would I?" encapsulates all that is great about the rock in the beginning of prog. In fact it's the best track on the whole album. The quiet verse melody is glorious. After two and a half minutes, the song explodes into an amazingly riff over which David Sinclair rocks and grooves. The harmony vocals take the tune even further past sublimity. The riff returns, faster then slower, and the song ends on jarring, repeated guitar dischords and a massive crash on Richard Coughlan's ever awesome drums. Unremittingly complex yet bursting with infectious melody, this is the sound of a great progressive band at the height of its powers.

Conclusion: For their first album, Caravan was surprisingly strong. While steeped in the same British psychedelia that informed many of the bands in those days, Caravan relates a certain freedom of spirit. Caravan's debut straddles the fence between psych and prog. I think this album was always underrated. It has a lot of beautiful psychedelic songs and represents a perfect example of the music in the end of the 60's and of what would be the prog and the beginning of the classic golden era of the prog rock music in the glorious days of the 70's. In fact only the lengthy final track "Where But For Caravan Would I?" really goes further than simply flirting with prog. This is clearly a great prog track. I always considered Caravan the best and most representative band of the Canterbury scene. Their five first studio albums are all excellent and represent a great intro into this sub-genre of prog. This is definitely an album not to be missed, really.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1973
4.18 | 727 ratings

BUY
For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by siLLy puPPy
Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

5 stars CARAVAN had suffered the same fate that many ambitious artistically oriented early 70s bands shared, namely a lack of financial stability in exchange for the overtly sophisticated progressive developments that they were developing. After what should have been their breakthrough success album with "In The Land Of They Grey And Pink," the band found its first major shakeup as founding member and keyboardist Dave Sinclair jumped ship and joined Robert Wyatt in his fledgling Matching Mole project. After reasserting their desire to carry on as a band, the remaining members recruited a replacement in the form of Steve Miller who filled the role quite nicely but also brought an overload of jazz sensibilities to the table. After the change in direction that resulted in the following "Waterloo Lily," CARAVAN's bold new direction left many fans alienated but not all was lost as many new ones filled their shoes. Feeling like the band's direction was merely spinning wheels, Miller's recalcitrant stance of wanting to follow Soft Machine into ever jazzier arenas didn't go over too well and he was relieved of his duties.

After his short stint with Matching Mole, Dave Sinclair rejoined the band and with the addition of viola player Geoff Richardson, the band added a completely new dimension to its sound and the result was the interestingly titled and fifth studio album FOR GIRLS WHO GROW PLUMP IN THE NIGHT. The reactions of "Waterloo Lily" were mixed as some found the new direction favorable while others found it detracted from the band's potential however FOR GIRLS was universally praised for returning back to the rock elements as well as the challenging addition of a stellar horn section and elaborate symphonic orchestrations. The perfect mix of things conspired to create CARAVAN's last great album before they would water down their sound into a series of bland AOR sounding albums from which they would never fully recover. Now as a quintet, CARAVAN also solicited the help of twelve session musicians which makes FOR GIRLS sound like a larger than life experience.

The difference between FOR GIRLS WHO GROW PLUMP IN THE NIGHT is immediately apparent as the the feisty "Memory Lain" which on some editions has the following "Headloss" tacked on, opens with a predominantly guitar and bass driven rock groove exhibiting faster tempos and heavier percussive drives than the dreamy offerings of the past. The track despite its rock guitar dominance still finds many opportunities to delve into psychedelic meanderings, heavy pile driving organ runs and the progressive jazzy chops that were characteristic of the Canterbury crowd of the era. While CARAVAN was clearly on the poppier side of the Canterbury spectrum, FOR GIRLS flawlessly balances the more accessible melodic developments with intricate uses of harmonic sophistication, subtle jazz touches and of course the traces of whimsy ubiquitous in the Canterbury vernacular. In some ways tracks like "Headloss" come off as straight forward hard rock but the incorporation of the bluesy viola, atmospheric organ touches as well as the Steely Dan-esque jazz-fusion harmonic touches take it to a totally different reality.

The more upbeat rock approach continues on "Hoedown" but "Surprise, Surprise" slows things down a bit and emphasizes the atmospheric touches. The formidable "C'thlu Thlu" packs a double identity as it alternates the introductory Jethro Tull like guitar riffs (think of Martin Barre on the "Aqualung" album) along with a funk laden segment that offers an energetic uptick which makes it sound like two completely different songs were fused together and one of the more brilliant moments on the album. Likewise the instantly addictive "The Dog, The Dog, He's at It Again" not only showcases the distinct Canterbury humor in full regalia but also delivers a distinct dreamy mid-tempo melody that qualifies as a first degree ear worm but in the most pleasant aspect of the term. The track is characteristic of a perfectly written singer / songwriter style of musical sensibility augmented by things such as ska syncopation, orchestral backing and then a foray into a sizzling keyboard dominated series of soloing. A performance par excellence.

The final two tracks feature the over-the-top progressiveness and excessively titled "Be Alright / Chance Of A Lifetime" and closing finale "L'auberge du sanglier / A Hunting We Shall Go / Pengola / Backwards / A Hunting Shall We Go (Reprise)," the former which delivers another heavier rock veneer but also delves into the softer more flute oriented melodies of classic CARAVAN which i presume are aspects of each title although there is no clear distinction other than the stylistic change in the middle. Another great viola performance on this one. The closing medley of CARAVANism skirts near the ten minute mark and provides a multi-suite foray into the most progressive moments of the entire album. This is where the classical and jazz touches exceed the rock elements and the sophisticated orchestral parts are fully employed to create an exceedingly symphonic aural overload. While starting off soft and subtle and jumping into choppy off-kilter time signature laced guitar riffing, the track slowly evolves as it ratchets up into a fully fueled orchestral fury.

While many would argue otherwise, i personally rank FOR GIRLS WHO GROW PLUMP IN THE NIGHT second only to "If I Could Do It All Over Again, I'd Do It All Over You" as CARAVAN's finest moment, one they would unfortunately never repeat as starting with the following "Cunning Stunts" the band vied towards more commercial accessibility due to financial pressures but in reality sounded more like a neutered animal that had lost all its mojo making vitality. While this album signified a new era for CARAVAN that would lead to the "New Symphonia" live album, the volatility within the ranks found this another short-lived rendition of the band and essentially left FOR GIRLS as a triumphant anomaly within the band's discography. FOR GIRLS latched onto the perfect mix of heavier rock, symphonic orchestration, jazz tinged subtleties and Canterbury cheekiness that conspired to create an unforgettably unique album in the entire rock paradigm. As far as i'm concerned, this blows "In The Land Of Grey And Pink" away which has remained the band's most popular album. This one displays a much more diverse series of approaches that worked in tandem beautifully

4.5 but too good to round down

 In The Land Of Grey And Pink by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.29 | 1723 ratings

BUY
In The Land Of Grey And Pink
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by patrickq
Prog Reviewer

5 stars It almost seems like assigning too many five-star ratings implies a lack of manliness here. I want to be a tough guy, believe me! But what am I supposed to do with an album as great as In the Land of Grey and Pink?

(Before I go further, I'll remark that the version I'm reviewing here is the 2011 Steven Wilson stereo remix from the 40th Anniversary set.)

The Prog Archives definition of a five-star album is "Essential: a masterpiece of progressive rock music," and this describes In the Land of Grey and Pink thoroughly. Its performances, production, and compositions are all first-rate.

The first song I heard from In the Land of Grey and Pink was the title song, which appeared on Supernatural Fairy Tales, a Rhino compilation. It's a pleasant, if inane, little song. For some reason I was inspired to look into Caravan further, and I looked up the band on Prog Archives. At that time, you could download full mp3s from the website, and I'm pretty sure that's where I got a copy of "Nine Feet Underground," which blew me away. In a textbook case of music file sharing benefiting the music industry, I eventually purchased the "Deluxe" edition of the album for almost $30. And it was worth it.

As it turns out, the nice-enough song "In the Land of Grey and Pink" is the least interesting on the album. It and the album-opening "Golf Girl," both sung by bassist Richard Sinclair, are relatively light, pastoral tunes which I've come to think of as exemplars of the "Canterbury sound." "Golf Girl" is slightly more accessible and wittier. Equally accessible, but catchier, is "Love to Love You (And Tonight Pigs Will Fly)," sung by lead guitarist Pye Hastings. Now when I say that "Love to Love You" is accessible, I don't mean that its lyrics are relatable, or even that they make sense. Actually, the lyrics throughout In the Land of Grey and Pink are pretty good for progressive rock, but can't possibly be meant to be taken seriously.

"Golf Girl," "In the Land of Grey and Pink," and "Love to Love You" account for about thirteen of the album's forty-three minutes. The rest is occupied by the comparably progressive "Winter Wine" (sung by Sinclair) and "Nine Feet Underground" (sung by Hastings and Sinclair). Both are cut from the same cloth, and as the album's second song, the 7:36 "Winter Wine" serves as a preview of "Nine Feet," (22:43) which closes the album. Much has been made of the organ soloing on these songs and on the title track, and understandably so. Pardon the cliche, but keyboardist David Sinclair is on fire, especially on "Nine Feet."

I can't really say whether In the Land of Grey and Pink is, as many here claim, the best Canterbury Scene album ever; I haven't heard enough of the genre. Not knowing exactly how "Canterbury Scene" is defined as a subset of prog rock, I'll say that In the Land of Grey and Pink has significant elements of Symphonic Prog and Progressive Jazz, and to a greater extent, Progressive Folk. Despite these somewhat disparate ingredients, and although there are two distinct vocalists, In the Land of Grey and Pink hangs together as a single work.

So, great performances of great material. Highly recommended.

 In The Land Of Grey And Pink by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.29 | 1723 ratings

BUY
In The Land Of Grey And Pink
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by jamesbaldwin
Prog Reviewer

4 stars Third album of Caravan, "In The Land of Grey And Pink" is a classic of prog, and specially of Canterbury rock. This album is the emblem of a soft sonority, in pastel color, smooth, which expresses a lifted and fairytale lifestyle.

"Golf Girl" (5:05, vote 8,5) is a classic. It's a very characteristic song: the very English voice of Richard Sinclair, the trombone, the flute, the light-hearted rhythm, produce a fabulous song for children - and adults. Very good, actually. With his sound it introduces us to the Caravan universe. Beautiful instrumental pieces.

"Winter Wine" (7:46, vote 8,5). Again the voice of Richard Sinclair to create a new world. The track is a prelude to the suite of the second side, thanks to the solo keyboards and the bass button. But the best piece is when you hear the piano in the background. Anyway, with "Golf Girl" it is the best song of the Lp.

"Love To Love You (and Tonight Pigs Will Fly)", (3:06, vote 7,5/8) is sung by the guitarist Pye Hustings. It's a short track with a sustained rhythm, a lot of percussion. Amazing.

"In The Land Of Grey And Pink" (4:51, vote 7,5/8). Richard Sinclair sings a piece dominated by an excellent rhythm, without many variations, which has the best part in the central, instrumental section. End of side A.

Side B contains the suite "Nine Feet Underground" (22:40, vote 8). Divided into 8 pieces, and largely instrumental, it is one of the first suites of progressive rock, coeval to that of "Pawn Hearts". The beginning is dominated by the keyboards, but the rhythm section is well in evidence (excellent bass sound). The rhythm is relaxed, and does not change mood even when the sax enters a variation on the central melody, which then returns, to open the sung part. After another variation of the theme with the keyboards, towards the eleventh minute finally the rhythm slows down, the music stops ... but soon starts again with another movement of the suite, still characterized by the keyboards solo, but the drums and the bass are not standing still, and they contribute to create a certain frenzy, a beautiful "crescendo", which however soon ends and enters the organ of the David Sinclari, the factotum, with almost psychedelic sounds. Then the singing returns, which reassures the waters that had just rippled. The voice of Richard Sinclair is fluted, and brings harmony again. But here wisely the Caravan decide to raise the pace, and finally when three minutes are left to the end comes a gritty, almost heavy piece (God be praised!), which ends the record in "crescendo".

Caravans draw a fable, with this album, characterized by the pastel colors of the album cover. Their art is to describe their own universe, smooth, made of relaxation and harmony. The defect, what is missing to be an absolute masterpiece, is the pathos, is the drama, the depth. It 's all a bit' too calm, too homogeneous, for my taste, it slips away too easily, like warm water on a smooth table.

Side A. 8,5; Side B: 8. Vote Album: 8+. Rating: Four Stars.

 Cunning Stunts by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1975
3.15 | 336 ratings

BUY
Cunning Stunts
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by YourJefa

2 stars I think this is where the magic ended.

What can I say about "Cunning stunts"? First of all I have to say it was not a great impression the first time that I heard it (or the second, or the third, or the fourth...), they had created something completely different of what they used to do.

It's not a terrible album, it's not a whole disappointing experience like Pink Floyd's "Final cut", but still, I think they could created something better. There's a song in this album (I don't remember which one exactly) that sounds like Earth, Wind & Fire but without the trumpets, and the first one sounds like something that John Lennon would have made, but not Caravan.

"No backstage pass" is the closest they got to their classic style, that and some moments of "Dabsong conshirto" (that could have been a great song if had last 10 or 12 minutes). In general, this is a Classic Pop (I couldn't even say Classic Rock) album. Maybe if instead of CARAVAN they would have changed their name to something else, I could say this is a great album.

I don't think I can give it even three stars, so two.

Sorry, guys.

 For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1973
4.18 | 727 ratings

BUY
For Girls Who Grow Plump In The Night
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by YourJefa

4 stars Another great album by Caravan. "For girls who grow plump in the night" is their fifth album and to be honest is way too different from the first four.

Here we can appretiate a heavier sound, in some points this album reminds me to some works by bands like Atomic Rooster or High Tide, those sounds mixed with the classic Canterbury style that Caravan has.

This is probably Caravan's most experimental album, at least that's what I believe; not only because the introduction of the obvious new style, but also I think here we have the first part of a not- all-CanterburyScene-style that continues in "Cunning stunts". Here they were trying to get new sounds, that's clear.

There's a chance that people who had listen Caravan's first four albums to like "Plump in the night", or maybe they can get disappointed. I like it, not as much as I like the previous ones, but I do.

Four stars!

 Waterloo Lily by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1972
3.77 | 549 ratings

BUY
Waterloo Lily
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by YourJefa

4 stars Probably not one of the greatest albums in Caravan's discography but still a very well done work. After the two well-diserved-five-stars previous albums ("If I could do it all over again" and "In the land of grey and pink") anybody would expect their following album would be equally great, but I feel they couldn't get that level neither in "Waterloo Lily" nor in any of their following albums.

It's not a bad album, that needs to be clear, in fact is one of my all time favourites, not one of my 100 favourites, maybe, but still I do believe it's a great work.

The opening song defends their classic sound. The album starts very well, the following songs are great too, but they don't catch the listener to really fall in love with them (at least not to me).

When the album ends I feel satisfied, because (I insist) it is a good album, but I can't feel the same magic that I always get with other Caravan albums.

Four stars...

 In The Land Of Grey And Pink by CARAVAN album cover Studio Album, 1971
4.29 | 1723 ratings

BUY
In The Land Of Grey And Pink
Caravan Canterbury Scene

Review by YourJefa

5 stars What I have to say about this album is that it really changed my life and my point of view about all that I used to know about music.

The first time that I heard this album I was like sixteen years old, I was just starting to listen to Prog Rock music and I didn't know what I was about to find.

This is probably my second favourite Prog Rock album of all time (just before Aphrodite's Child's "666"). The five original tracks are majestic, I can say that this is one of the most amazing albums ever created.

I could start to say my opinion about every single song in this album, but that would be a waste of time, because I can't find any negative thing to say about any of the songs, so pretty much I would be just writing about how amazing and beautiful they are.

Five stars, obviously!!

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

Copyright Prog Archives, All rights reserved. | Legal Notice | Privacy Policy | Advertise | RSS + syndications

Other sites in the MAC network: JazzMusicArchives.com — jazz music reviews and archives | MetalMusicArchives.com — metal music reviews and archives