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PETER GABRIEL

Crossover Prog • United Kingdom


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Peter Gabriel biography
Peter Brian Gabriel - Born 13 February 1950 (Chobham, Surrey, UK)

Musician, writer and video maker, Peter GABRIEL is one of the most loved musicians in prog-scene. He was the singer and front-man of GENESIS since 1967 to 1975, but that´s another story...

GABRIEL started his solo career in 1977, and since then he has released 8 studio albums, 2 live albums, 3 original sound tracks and 3 compilations, always with the collaboration of a lot of different and great musicians and playing different musical styles. 1977 was the date of the release of Peter´s first album "Peter Gabriel 1", one year after "Peter Gabriel 2" was published, both albums have a similar sound (pop-prog-rock), and count with the production and guitars of KING CRIMSON's Robert Fripp and Tony Levin on bass, being Tony an active member of Peter's band since then. "Solsbury Hill" was the hit single of GABRIEL´s first work, both albums include classic songs that are still being played on his actual shows. In 1980 two things happened, one was the release of Peter's third album "Peter Gabriel 3", this one being the most complete work till date in the opinion of a lot of fans, and also was the foundation of WOMAD (World Of Music, Arts and Dance) where Peter and other members of WOMAD played a series of festivals around the world, where they mixed traditional and modern music. In 1982 Peter published "Security" album, with a different sound, more electronic and also it was the first time that Peter began to use African sounds in his albums. This was followed by the double live album "Peter Gabriel Plays Live". Two years after Peter released his first OST "Birdy" (Alan Parker film), which was a great mix of eerie sounds and relaxing music.

Just one year after, in 1986 "So" was published, which was a well known and best selling album, with a clear pop sound and hit singles like "Sledgehammer" and "Don´t Give Up" (with the collaboration of Kate Bush on vocals) and the great "Red Rain". This album won several awards, especially for his video clips, very sophisticated for that year. Three years after, Peter published his second OST, Martin Scorcese's "Last Temptation Of Christ", one of the most experimental and innovative albums, with a mix of different musical styles. After this album a compilation "Shaking The Tree Sixteen Golden Greats" was published, and in 1988 Peter was involved in some benefit concerts, like "Human Right...
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PETER GABRIEL discography


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PETER GABRIEL top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.58 | 711 ratings
Peter Gabriel 1 [Aka: Car]
1977
3.01 | 581 ratings
Peter Gabriel 2 [Aka: Scratch]
1978
4.21 | 932 ratings
Peter Gabriel 3 [Aka: Melt]
1980
3.95 | 644 ratings
Peter Gabriel 4 [Aka: Mask, Aka: Security]
1982
2.98 | 213 ratings
Birdy (OST)
1985
3.84 | 724 ratings
So
1986
4.08 | 450 ratings
Passion - Music from The Last Temptation Of Christ
1989
3.62 | 509 ratings
Us
1992
3.47 | 237 ratings
OVO
2000
3.31 | 133 ratings
Long Walk Home - Music from The Rabbit-Proof Fence
2002
3.98 | 590 ratings
Up
2002
2.79 | 135 ratings
Big Blue Ball
2008
2.88 | 251 ratings
Scratch My Back
2010
3.59 | 210 ratings
New Blood
2011
2.89 | 75 ratings
And I'll Scratch Yours
2013

PETER GABRIEL Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.06 | 252 ratings
Plays Live
1983
2.45 | 47 ratings
Plays Live - Highlights
1983
3.95 | 161 ratings
Secret World Live
1994
3.59 | 50 ratings
Live Blood
2011
4.23 | 17 ratings
Growing Up Live
2019

PETER GABRIEL Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.12 | 38 ratings
P.O.V.
1990
4.33 | 197 ratings
Secret World Live
1994
4.53 | 207 ratings
Growing Up Live
2003
3.82 | 79 ratings
Play: The Videos
2004
3.83 | 74 ratings
Still Growing Up - Live And Unwrapped
2005
4.15 | 54 ratings
New Blood - Live in London
2011
4.50 | 14 ratings
Live In Buenos Aires 1988
2011
4.43 | 39 ratings
Live In Athens 1987
2013
4.25 | 32 ratings
Back to Front: Live in London
2014

PETER GABRIEL Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.52 | 42 ratings
Ein deutsches Album
1980
3.67 | 51 ratings
Deutsches album
1982
5.00 | 1 ratings
Collectors' Edition
1990
3.87 | 99 ratings
Shaking the Tree: Sixteen Golden Greats
1990
3.29 | 16 ratings
Revisited
1992
3.80 | 57 ratings
Hit
2003
3.33 | 3 ratings
Scratch My Back / And I'll Scratch Yours
2013
3.21 | 15 ratings
Rated PG
2019
3.28 | 13 ratings
Flotsam and Jetsam
2019

PETER GABRIEL Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

4.09 | 25 ratings
Solsbury Hill
1977
2.74 | 19 ratings
Modern Love
1977
2.03 | 19 ratings
D.I.Y.
1978
3.36 | 11 ratings
D.I.Y.
1978
4.05 | 24 ratings
No Self Control
1980
4.23 | 29 ratings
Games Without Frontiers
1980
4.03 | 28 ratings
Biko
1980
4.24 | 17 ratings
Solsbury Hill
1980
3.29 | 7 ratings
I Don't Remember
1980
0.00 | 0 ratings
Spiel ohne Grenzen
1980
3.53 | 7 ratings
Wallflower
1982
3.33 | 23 ratings
I Have The Touch
1982
3.23 | 29 ratings
Shock the Monkey
1982
4.07 | 21 ratings
I Don't Remember
1983
3.04 | 6 ratings
Solsbury Hill (Live)
1983
0.00 | 0 ratings
Out Out
1984
2.27 | 13 ratings
Walk Through The Fire
1984
3.92 | 27 ratings
Sledgehammer
1986
3.81 | 29 ratings
Don't Give Up (w/ Kate Bush)
1986
2.44 | 26 ratings
Big Time (maxi-single)
1986
3.25 | 8 ratings
Sledgehammer - Dance mix
1986
3.16 | 6 ratings
In Your Eyes
1986
3.90 | 10 ratings
Solsbury Hill
1986
3.13 | 12 ratings
Biko/No More Apartheid (maxi-single)
1987
3.54 | 20 ratings
Red Rain
1987
3.50 | 12 ratings
Shakin' The Tree (w/ Youssou N'Dour)
1989
3.57 | 14 ratings
Steam
1992
3.86 | 21 ratings
Digging In The Dirt
1992
3.67 | 6 ratings
Digging In The Dirt - Brown Linen Box
1992
3.80 | 15 ratings
Blood Of Eden
1993
3.33 | 3 ratings
Be Still
1993
2.92 | 12 ratings
Kiss That Frog
1993
3.71 | 7 ratings
SW Live EP
1994
3.40 | 5 ratings
Lovetown
1994
3.60 | 5 ratings
While the Earth Sleeps (w/ Deep Forest)
1996
0.00 | 0 ratings
That'll Do
1998
2.43 | 7 ratings
The Story Of Ovo
2000
3.67 | 9 ratings
More Than This
2002
2.38 | 15 ratings
The Barry Williams Show
2002
3.44 | 9 ratings
Burn You Up, Burn You Down
2003
3.33 | 12 ratings
Growing Up
2003
0.00 | 0 ratings
Big Time (with Electro Kingdom)
2005
4.25 | 4 ratings
Peter Gabriel
2007
2.33 | 3 ratings
Salala (featuring Angelique Kidjo)
2007
4.00 | 4 ratings
Whole Thing
2008
3.89 | 26 ratings
Down to Earth
2008
4.00 | 10 ratings
The Book of Love / Not One of Us
2010
4.30 | 10 ratings
Live in Buenos Aires 1988
2011
3.60 | 6 ratings
Courage
2013
0.00 | 0 ratings
Sledgehammer
2015
4.20 | 5 ratings
The Veil
2016
4.29 | 7 ratings
I'm Amazing
2016

PETER GABRIEL Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Peter Gabriel 2 [Aka: Scratch] by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Studio Album, 1978
3.01 | 581 ratings

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Peter Gabriel 2 [Aka: Scratch]
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by SeeHatfield

3 stars "Looking for movement within the haze?"

Peter Gabriel's second solo album starts out strong but then fizzles. From the anthemic opener, "On the Air," to the resigned and cynical closer, "Home Sweet Home," is quite a fall. That fall is a symptom of the irresolution that haunts this album, which for Gabriel is something of a transitional patchwork. Robert Fripp's production is sympathetic but perhaps not tough enough to get at what is potentially good here, and the record wavers. The good parts are pretty damn good, though.

By the late seventies, both Gabriel and Fripp were eager to shake off their reps as ringleaders of what we now know as the first generation of "prog." Both were alienated from the genre; both had misgivings about the corporatizing of progressive music and the distance between artist and audience that marked stadium rock. Fripp and Gabriel were leery of being rock "stars" and sympathized with the gust of new energy that was punk rock. Gabriel's second album is not exactly punk (he would never be stripped down and spontaneous enough for that) but is punk-adjacent, affecting an anti-corporate, balls-out attitude and serving up lots of hard, guitar-driven rock. Recorded mostly in Holland, but then ironed out in New York, it is very much a slice of late-70s, NYC-oriented, postpunk art rock, the kind of record that could rub elbows with Television or the early Talking Heads.

Notably, this album is one of Fripp's early production credits outside of King Crimson (and Fripp & Eno). It came after his work on Daryl Hall's solo album Sacred Songs (1977, though unreleased until 1980) and before Fripp's own solo album Exposure (1979) and his work with the Roches (1979; 1982). It also came before Fripp's new wave / proto-math rock quartet, the League of Gentlemen (1980-81), a project that offered much rawer, spikier music. The avant-punk sympathies notable on Exposure come out on this Gabriel album occasionally, but nothing here rocks out as jaggedly as the League. The closest contenders for the punk ethos here would be the two opening cuts, "On the Air" and "D.I.Y.," both of which scream defiance. But they're rather different songs.

"On the Air" is a persona song, sung by a recurrent Gabriel character, "Mozo," who seems to be both a pirate radio operator and social outcast. Its verse is spiked by power chords with a bit of a fuzzed, glammed-out feel. It's a right scorcher and strong opener, though the lyric's exact meaning (perhaps unsurprisingly for Gabriel) is more obscure than it seems on first listen, like something drawn out of a private mythology. To me, Mozo sounds as if he could be a character from The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, and lyrically the song could be a Lamb outtake (this during a period when Gabriel and his band still performed the Lamb's title song, or "Back in N.Y.C.," as encores). This song segues right into "D.I.Y.," which is a tribute to the punk ethos ("You want some control, you've got to keep it small") in the form of a chant, with the title phrase, "DIY, DIY," repeating over and over against an insistent, chopping rhythm -- a kind of minimalist art song that wouldn't have been out of place on Brian Eno's first couple of solo albums. The sound isn't punk, but the sentiment is meant to be. Of course, during this period Gabriel and his touring band shaved their heads and adopted a sort of punk look (despite the mad chops and intimidating gear onstage at a Gabriel show).

The truth is, the album is too slick for punk, and Gabriel's best nods to the punk ethos would come in another year or two when he abandoned the idea of sounding punk and instead allowed himself to sound alien (on his breakthrough third album, 1980). Reportedly, Fripp pushed Gabriel through the recording process in record time (Gabriel recalls that Fripp "was very keen to try speeding up my recording process, as many people have been since and failed, but he got closest to it"). But the record does not sound spontaneous; it sounds, as usual, workshoppy and dense with ideas. The electric guitars are not raw but compressed and sleek, and several tracks boast beds of percolating synth by keyboardist Larry Fast. Most of the players, including guitarist Sid McGinnis (a Barry Manilow sideman later known for the Late Show with David Letterman) and of course bassist Tony Levin and drummer Jerry Marotta (both Gabriel mainstays), were sought-after session musicians. Keyboardists Tony (Bayeté) Cochran, an accomplished jazz player and composer, and Roy Bittan, of E Street Band fame, are no slouches either, and Timmy (Sax Man) Cappello blows up a storm on two tracks (reminding me of nothing so much as the opening of a Saturday Night Live show in the Howard Shore / Paul Shaffer era). The musicianship is diamond-sharp, even though the sound of the record is a bit of a haze. Although Gabriel often seems to be rebelling against the extravagant production of his first solo album (produced by Bob Ezrin, 1977), and there are moments of bracing austerity ("Mother of Violence," "Indigo"), this is not a spare or minimalist record.

The first side of the album is far stronger than the second, with not only the two opening salvos but also the fragile, haunting meditation "Mother of Violence," a pared-down song co-written by Gabriel's then-wife Jill and anchored by McGinnis's acoustic and Bittan's piano (grounding the track much as Bittan does for Springsteen's "Meeting Across the River," for example). Plus, the first side ends with the number that fascinates me most, "White Shadow," a surreal, imagistic song that pits an Orientalist riff (à la "Kashmir") against lyrics that seem to reflect, as on The Lamb, Gabriel's fascination with American things ("In God we trust," "All wrapped to go like Kentucky Fried"). It's not the lyric that gets me, though it's evasive and worth thinking about. It's just the sound, in particular the steady, almost plodding 4/4, enlivened by Levin's propulsive bass and offset by a droning, minor-key synth figure whose descending chords seem to work with and against the beat. That, and the decorative, almost fanfaric synth licks, reinforce a (again) vaguely Arabian or Middle Eastern feel. I'm afraid I lack the musical theory vocabulary to explain this well (should I be saying something about the Phrygian mode here? I dunno, but maybe other folks on PA can clue me in?). But the effect is circling, hypnotic, potentially endless (reportedly, the original vinyl release of the album went into a nonstop groove at the end of this side). What makes all this sublime is Fripp's solo at the end, a series of ascending lines played against the cycling chords, somehow frenzied and yet (because Fripp!) precise and cunning. It's great. (My mental list of great guitar solos includes several by Fripp on other people's records.)

Sadly, the second side of this album feels inconsistent and irresolute, like a series of genre sketches, and there's no build or payoff at the end. The rockers "Animal Magic" and "Perspective" are expertly played but unexceptional (twists on what Gabriel had already done with "Modern Love," on his previous album). "Exposure," a Gabriel/Fripp experiment later redone on Fripp's solo album, is a spooky groove against a backdrop of keening Frippertronics, graced by a loping Levin bass part, wonderfully chunky and heavy. It's less a song than a piece, if you know what I mean, though Gabriel's vocal is spirited and raw. "Flotsam and Jetsam" is almost an abstract for a song: a lovely promise of something undelivered. The closer, "Home Sweet Home," is theatrically pitiful, cheaply ironic, and crass: a loser's narrative in song, the polar opposite of the way Gabriel handles a similar theme in the later (and better) "Don't Give Up." It's a weak anchor leg. Though Gabriel's vocal builds to an interesting tormented weirdness, the feeling comes shrink-wrapped in bald sarcasm.

In general, Side 2 of the album feels schizoid, with a couple of downbeat, depressive ballads being most personal, while the rockers seek to provide ballast but feel a bit programmed. Without Side 2's rockers, the album could be a long, dry stretch, but they don't feel special.

Maybe the worst thing about this album, though, is how muffled and blurry so many of the vocals are. While Gabriel's voice occasionally rides above the mix, often it sounds half-buried, almost strangled. As Eric Tamm notes, the album "sounds like it comes out of a dingy garage." Having recently relistened to Gabriel's first two albums back to back (in what I assume to be remastered, optimal form), I have to say that Bob Ezrin seemed to push Gabriel vocally, really making him own the songs, whereas Fripp's production, though it allows Gabriel more room to experiment, doesn't haul the singer out into the open. The total effect is that some of the most interesting writing on the album has to work its way out of a layer of gauze.

Still, there is half an excellent album here. And what would come next for Gabriel would be a real kick in the slats: something new, arresting, and not generic at all.

 Modern Love by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1977
2.74 | 19 ratings

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Modern Love
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars 20-Year Chronological Run-Through pt. Fifteen: 1977.

-- First review for this single -- PETER GABRIEL's debut could be considered slightly over-produced. It also has a feel that the former Genesis vocalist wanted to show off how many kinds of song styles he could deal with: barbershop harmonies ('Excuse Me'), blues ('Waiting for the Big One'), balladry, etc. The album is at its poppiest on 'Modern Love'. Sure, 'Solsbury Hill' was the hit and to-be evergreen in his discography, but it's much more sophisticated than in-your- face catchy and chorus-repetitive 'Modern Love'. Hardly any PG fan values this song very highly. It was also turned into a stupid music video in which Gabriel, dressed awkwardly, is moving nervously on an escalator: in Gabriel's music video compilation "Play" it's revealingly added as a bonus, not on the main selection.

'Slowburn' also represents the rockier and more energetic side of the debut album, and is definitely one of the songs that are in my opinion over-produced, ie. way too much muscle in the sound. But I like the delicate moment ("Shooting down...") and the powerful electric guitar solo after it.

2½ stars rounded down.

 Scratch My Back by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Studio Album, 2010
2.88 | 251 ratings

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Scratch My Back
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

2 stars It's sad that Peter Gabriel, one of my biggest long-time favourites of male singer-songwriters, hasn't released a single proper studio album with new material since Up (2002). Instead there have been various projects based on recycling old material. When this covers album came out -- what, already ten years ago! -- I borrowed the CD from the library, but it was hardly more than a curiosity to me. Years later I listened to, and even reviewed here, the latter half of the project, And I'll Scratch Yours (2013), in which the covered artists cover Peter Gabriel's songs. Although I didn't have a permanent interest for that one either, it was clearly the more interesting one of the two releases. Let's see how I respond to this music now on return.

The crucial reason for my initial disappointment on this release was (and is also now) the determined, unified style of performances, ie. the orchestral but rather introvert arrangements lacking rock instruments. In small doses that approach functions very well. To picture this, I have always preferred the ripped-down versions of 'Here Comes the Flood' over the overproduced 1977 album original. In the beginning of this album, DAVID BOWIE's 'Heroes' and PAUL SIMON's 'The Boy in the Bubble' have nice, calm versions.

The other reason for disappointment was (and is) that those songs I wasn't already familiar with, leave me mostly cold here. And they are a big majority. On the ELBOW song 'Mirrorball' the orchestra gets disturbingly noisy. I have never listened to BON IVER, but PG's version of 'Flume', as pretty as it might be, is just another slow-tempo performance for Peter Gabriel's voice, piano and orchestra. I wasn't familiar with the TALKING HEADS song 'Listening Wind', but its violin-centred version is nevertheless among the few highlights. LOU REED's 'The Power of the Heart': again, on small doses fairly enjoyable orchestral PG delicacy, but not on the long run. ARCADE FIRE and THE MAGNETIC FIELDS, other totally unfamiliar bands to me, other "so what" interpretetations in the exactly same manner. Boooooring.

PG's liner notes reveal that his original choice from RANDY NEWMAN was 'Baltimore' which I would have preferred over the much covered 'I Think It's Going to Rain Today'. The REGINA SPEKTOR song 'Aprés Moi' (in English, despite the French title) has another edgy arrangement which I'm not fond of. Especially the sharp brass instruments sound nasty to me, preventing me to concentrate on the song's essence. 'Philadelphia' sadly isn't among the bunch of NEIL YOUNG songs I know, but in any case I'm fed up with the brass-heavy arrangements at this point. The closing number, RADIOHEAD's 'Street Spirit (Fade Out)' is a good one in its moody delicacy that slightly reminds me of 'The Drop' from the Up album. But the whole is sonically too singular and monotonous to keep the listener interested.

Now that I think of it: can I name a single covers-only album recorded by an artist that I like, that has made a notable impression on me? Bowie's Pin-Ups? Songs from the Mirror by Fish? Tori Amos' Strange Little Girls? No, none of them much stirred me. Among covers albums, I just might have had the most positive feelings for the Finnish troubadour Matti Johannes Koivu's acoustic interpretations of songs by the bygone schlager singer Irwin Goodman -- for whom as the original performer I have no interest whatsoever! Also my namesake himself was a new acquaintance for me at the time. That may seem strange indeed that my long-time favourite artist loses to a black horse like that, but in the end it's all about expectations: on the Peter Gabriel scale, Scratch My Back is a massive disappointment.

 So by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Studio Album, 1986
3.84 | 724 ratings

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So
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by Hector Enrique

3 stars So it is the great commercial success of Peter Gabriel without a doubt, which gave him the platform to expand his horizons and share his proposal to a wider audience, without losing sight of its essence and compositional richness. A large number of musicians from different musical currents and ethnic groups were summoned, incorporating textures and nuances that brought it closer to the concept of Word music but with its unique stamp.

Regarding their best songs, I prefer the initial and forceful Red Rain, where Gabriel is vocally demanding to the extreme, ending the song almost a cappella dramatically, and In your Eyes, whose introduction with a simple and introspective piano makes the song is worth a long time. The live version of In your Eyes lasts twice as long, gaining a lot in dynamism. Her deepest and most sensitive vein is found in two other songs: the reflective and painful Mercy Street, a depressed tribute to the American poet Anne Sexton, as well as in the resilient and popular ballad Don´t Give up with a Kate Bush magnificently caressing the melody and contrasting with Gabriel's harsh voice.

On the other hand, the commercial Sledgehammer boasts a very advanced audiovisual handling for the time, a very funky theme, and probably one of the most popular songs on So, even though it is not one of my favorites.

The rest of the songs are brushstrokes of the new winds that the singer had been traveling through: That Voice Again, Big Time, We Do What We´re Told and This is the Picture show us how Gabriel launched himself into the exploration of new sounds, in some complicated cases to process for those who, as in my case, find it more forceful with his early solo works.

All in all So is a good album and consolidates Peter Gabriel as a star that shines with his own light, already clearly detached from his glorious past with Genesis.

 Shock the Monkey by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1982
3.23 | 29 ratings

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Shock the Monkey
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by FalconBleck

1 stars #46 Review

This is my first review of any Peter Gabriel stuff and i chose this song because it got stuck with me for a month, its a pretty entertaining music track.

That's no the only reason why i am in here though... i'm here because of the odd discussion and comparison that many Genesis "fans" do here on Peter Gabriel reviews, like comparing the output of both careers saying that Genesis sold out and Peter was still keeping the Prog flame lit, i find it even more odd when people say that songs like this one are more musically complex that anything Genesis did on the 80s.

So this review will be a little bit different, i don't usually do technical reviews, but this song is so "simple" (to explain musically at least) i might just give it a shot.

Since i was so fascinated with this music piece, i tried to learn it and that revealed me tons about how it was composed, i was able to figure out more than 9 tracks of audio in this particular composition, more than half of those are percussions that sound drastically different from each other, some electronically made, others the real thing. The other thing i learnt about this song is the chords used, of wich there are only 2, i know its strange to have a song with less chords than the most basic Phil Collins stuff, but in this case, the entire song features 1, until it reaches the climax where it changes, the song hooks you in some way and then after lots of repetition the song changes chords wich feels very dramatical, and that's great.

Now compare it to Genesis output during this time, maybe a simple song like "Man on the Corner", wich i don't like, also very repetitive but its the chords that get this piece to life, yet it features like 4 tracks at most. Do you really just need more tracks to make your song more interesting, to give the idea of being more complex? Or is it the structure? Now compare it to REAL progrock stuff like "Firth of Fifth", it has SO much more than what this little repetitive monkey song offers.

Shock the Monkey might be experimental, but is in its simplicity, in its capacity to convey a complex feeling, that's what makes a good music piece, yet it is also hindered by Peter Gabriel saying "Monkey" 46 times during the song, i think that the point of the piece is made much earlier on the running time.

The first time you hear it, it might not click, and then you end up listening to it over and over again, hearing every piece and note that makes this song, after that you might learn it and what you end up is with dissapointment, feeling like you just wasted your time.

Peter Gabriel's strong suit are weird unusual ugly chords, while his mate Tony Banks has the ability to make weird unusual rimbombastic chords, both things that no one would normally use for hit singles, yet Peter managed, compared to Tony also, he doesn't do that many changes or long songs, as he said once "An artist without limits is the death of creative expression" i personally don't agree to a point but his philosphy really paid off in the end.

So, this song is repetitive trash, but good artistic repetitive trash, i was going to give this track 3 stars, but it has so much rating that i'm going to give it just 1, it really doesn't deserve the recomendation for any prog rock music collection, but it is good though.

 Growing Up Live by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Live, 2019
4.23 | 17 ratings

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Growing Up Live
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by Heart of the Matter

4 stars I just can't think what more can we ask from a live album by a major prog artist such as Mr. Gabriel here, who in addition counts as founding member and iconic voice of one of the truly sacred cows in the golden age of the genre, the band Genesis.

Gathered here we find well-known classics, but also some more obscure (but not less valuable) material. All presented by Peter in great vocal form, played with taste, expertise and no excess by the band, seasoned generously with soul & ethnic touches adding a fantastic ambiance of world-music, and, last but not least, with the best possible sound for a live recording.

As it's not easy to think of live albums as "masterpices", I must resign to four, but in a live ranking, it's a five.

 Wallflower by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Singles/EPs/Fan Club/Promo, 1982
3.53 | 7 ratings

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Wallflower
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by Matti
Prog Reviewer

3 stars I have a strong appreciation for Peter Gabriel's third album nicknamed "Melt" (1980), but my relationship with the fourth one, also known as "Security" by its US title, has always been more difficult, as its strange cover art too. It is definitely not an album I'd enjoy listening to from beginning to end, but some of its songs are on my list of PG favourites, 'San Jacinto' especially. Perhaps the album is for my taste a bit too percussive, hollow, dry and stark sonically. But onto this single of two album outtakes.

'Wallflower' deals with mistreatment and political injustice towards individuals, such as of political prisoners in Latin America, and I read in a PG biography that the primary source of inspiration was Lech Walesa, the leader of the Solidarity movement in Poland. The song is my other highlight, the album's softest track for sure, full of cathartic emotion and beautiful melodies. Like several other songs from the albums 3 and 4, the composition was recycled into a little instrumental piece in Gabriel's first soundtrack album Birdy (1985) -- music for a film based on William Wharton's impressive novel -- and accidentally the original song has lyrics that in my opinion would quite well suit for the story of Birdy, the young man who's mentally injured by the Vietnam war and seems like a hopless case for "clean white coats" whose "eyes are all as hidden as their Hippocratic Oath". In fact 'Wallflower' became dear to me at the time I read the book and saw the film, when I was 15 or 16.

On 'Kiss of Life', the closing song in the album, PG puts on a cheerful and danceable gear, or a "commercial sound" as Guillermo put it in his review. It has in-your-face rhythm with Latin influences and a synth oriented sound I'm not fond of at all. Rather an irritating upbeat song, to be honest. Four stars for 'Wallflower' and two for 'Kiss of Life' => three stars.

 OVO by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Studio Album, 2000
3.47 | 237 ratings

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OVO
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by SteveG

4 stars OVO is Peter Gabriel's musical contribution to the UK Millennial Experience exhibition and is right up his world music soundtrack alley. Fussing disparate musical styles and instrumentation, similar to what he did on the Passion soundtrack, Gabriel is more bold and experimental, if less focused and visceral this time around. This eclectic mix of styles runs the gamut from an Afro-Celtic reel (with tribal drumming) to soulful R&B to an industrial rocker to ambient soundscapes, all with that distinct Gabriel musical underpinning that pulls it all together into a singular whole. Peter hands off most vocals to guest artists like Richie Havens, Emma Everett and Paul Buchanan while slipping in a few vocals of his own. That said, his wistful piano ballad "Father, Son" is teeming with emotion and is one of Gabriel's best vocals found on this or any record. Gabriel is more of a composer and musical director on this venture adding piano, synths, programming and a handful of hand percussion to songs that feature old band mates Tony Leven (bass), David Rhodes (guitar) and Manu Katché (drums). Supported by a "Real World" cast that supplied all of those strange, exotic and esoteric instruments that we fell in love with on the Passion soundtrack, we also see a welcome return of the extraordinary double violin of L. Shankar.

The lead off track "The Story Of Ovo" is just that, a dialog over music done in a rap style by Neneh Cherry and a bloke named Rasco. Not very prog but once you've got the story down, you can easily skip this track on future listenings to start the album on the sublime second track titled "Low Light" and enjoy this wonderful musical journey to the end of the album. This is the type of album that requires careful and repeated listening to explore and savor all the nuances of this lush, layered and well produced music. So kick back, relax and enjoy it with a glass of your favorite wine. 4 stars.

 Flotsam and Jetsam by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
3.28 | 13 ratings

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Flotsam and Jetsam
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by TCat
Forum & Site Admin Group Eclectic / Prog Metal / Heavy Prog Team

3 stars This 3-section collection of tracks from the great Peter Gabriel features a lot of tracks that were released on various singles and EPs, soundtracks and what-not that are being made available for the first time digitally. Many of these tracks are relatively rare when compared to Gabriel's albums and releases and have probably not been heard before by a majority of his casual fans. It is a great collection and pretty much runs in a chronological order.

There are some great offerings here among these 62 tracks. Among these are the extended version of "Slowburn" from the "car" album, a live version of "Solsbury Hill" which was originally from a fanclub flexi disc, and alternate version of "I Don't Remember" and a remixed version of "Biko", and that is all just from the first "disc" of material. But there is an equal amount of less interesting material to wade through here like the 4 tracks from the "DIY single" released in 1978, the instrumental version of "Shock the Monkey" which suffers without Gabriel's vocals attached, and "Shosholoza" from the "Biko" 12" single released in 1980.

The second "disc" of material features several dance and extended mixes as this was the time when 12" singles featuring endless versions of the same song were quite popular. There is some repetitiveness among the tracks on this section of the collection, but the best selections were put into this collection so that when the same title appears more than once in sequence, the tracks are variable enough so that you don't get as bored of it as you might think. Highlights here are the special mix of "In Your Eyes", the up-beat version of "Mercy Street" (mixed by William Orbit) which brings new life in this normally overlooked masterpiece from the album "So". But, again, there is some material of lesser interest to get through here, so it is a sort of "pick and choose" game.

The last section of material carries us all the way up to 2016. This one has some of the most interesting and varied material. There are several soundtrack and homage tracks that are actually really good like his covers of "Summertime" and "Suzanne" and the catchy version of "Shaking the Tree" (from 1997 and the "Jungle 2 Jungle" soundtrack) and the City of Angels version of "I Grieve". There are some lesser known tracks from digital singles released in 2016, and these are also quite good; "I'm Amazing" and "The Veil". But, once again, there are some multiple versions of tracks. "Growing Up" has 3 different versions in a row, the most interesting of which it the Trent Reznor remix. The other two tend to make listening to the entire album a chore however. Like the other "discs" of material, this one has its share of weaker material.

For the casual fan, this collection has its share of ups and downs, and listening to it as a whole can result in an experience that feels a bit haphazard at times. This collection is one that works better as one where you can pick, choose, and play your favorites at will. It also works quite well for collectors of Gabriel's music that want to just hear everything they can, and will give this type of consumer satisfaction in hearing tracks they never had a chance of hearing otherwise, and actually owning them to their heart's content. I try to rate collections from a casual listener's standpoint however and how cohesive it sounds. Even though the music is in a chronological order, which by itself is quite logical, in this case it makes the entire collection seem a bit haphazard when listened to as a whole. Yes there is some excellent stuff here, but there is a lot of mediocre material that bring down the entire experience. There is a plethora of both types of tracks here, so it all averages out to a 3 star collection. It's great to have easier access to these tracks, but you have to listen to a lot of stinkers to find the gems here.

 Peter Gabriel 3 [Aka: Melt] by GABRIEL, PETER album cover Studio Album, 1980
4.21 | 932 ratings

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Peter Gabriel 3 [Aka: Melt]
Peter Gabriel Crossover Prog

Review by Hector Enrique

4 stars Gabriel's third solo album, III or Melt, is among his best works. Once again, with the collaboration of a large number of renowned musicians, among whom his ex-companion from the Genesis era, Phil Collins, Robert Fripp of the King Crimson and Kate Bush, among others, stands out, he manages not only to be interested in the value of his compositions musically speaking, but also for his lyrics with deep messages that in many cases are statements committed to his beliefs, something that although it occurs frequently within the music scene, it is always remarkable, beyond points of view that may be divergent.

Undoubtedly Biko (in honor of Stephen Biko, who died during apartheid in South Africa in the 1970s) is one of Gabriel's best known and most representative songs, and one that demonstrates his activism for the defense of human rights.

In my opinion, a song that stands out and I consider as one of his best songs, to which I return every time I listen to Gabriel's discography, is Family Snapshot, inspired by the book 'An Assassin's Diary' by Arthur Bremmer, who he describes as shoot a public political figure not for ideals but above all for the fame that such a fact generates. The rhythm changes, the voice with that particular Gabriel style, in just over 4 minutes, makes the song not let you breathe until the end. Definitely the best of his repertoire, and rarely sung live, I suppose by how demanding his performance must be.

On a superlative level we can also find I Don't Remember, And Through The Wire, Lead A Normal Life, Not One Of Us and Games Without Frontiers, a song that he wrote in the days prior to the 1980 Olympic Games, and that gave account that many times political and nationalist interests motivated behaviors that affected the relationships of individuals and societies. For this song he had the collaboration of Kate Bush in the second voice

Both Intruder, No Self Control and Start, I consider that although they are within the overall idea of ​​the album, they do not shine like the previous ones.

With this work Gabriel established himself more and more as a composer and musician who tried (and succeeded) to transcend the borders of the progressive world, incorporating elements of different cultures around the world into his musical proposal.

Thanks to ProgLucky for the artist addition. and to Quinino for the last updates

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