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MARILLION

Neo-Prog • United Kingdom


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Marillion picture
Marillion biography
Formed in 1979 in Aylesbury, UK (as Silmarillion, after the Tolkien novel) - Still active as of 2019

Pioneers of the second wave of progressive rock

The Early Years

After some early line-up changes, the first recognisable incarnation of the band was complete by 1982, with FISH (real name Derek William Dick), a charismatic Scottish frontman vocalist, Steve ROTHERY on guitars, Peter Trewavas on bass, Mark Kelly on keyboards, and Mick Pointer on drums.

The band built their reputation the old-fashioned way by gigging extensively, but their profile was also raised by some clever manipulation of the music press, especially journals such as Sounds, in which Fish often interviewed his proposition that the band were "prog with attitude", a new force for the post-punk era.

This profile landed them a record deal with EMI records, and, in 1982, they released an EP Market Square Heroes, which, it is fair to say, had more than a passing resemblance to the Genesis classic, The Knife. Also appearing was a monster prog track called Grendel.

However, it was the release in 1983 of their debut long player, Script For A Jester's Tear, which brought them to the wider attention of the rock world. The album spawned hit singles in Garden Party and He Knows You Know, was critically well received, and reached number 7 in the UK album charts.

The band's progress and workload were relentless after this point. They proved themselves to be somewhat merciless in the pursuit of musical and commercial success by ditching Pointer, who was felt to be sub-standard, and replacing him eventually with, after what the band described as their "Spinal Tap" period for drumming, Ian Mosley, formerly of The Steve Hackett Band. Pointer went on to jointly form Arena, a classic neo outfit who still record today, and still tours his Script era version of Marillion. The difference Mosley made, though, both live and in the studio, was palpable.

The line-up released three more albums; Fugazi, Misplaced Childhood, and, finally Clutching At Straws.

Misplaced Childhood was a massive hit, reaching number 1 in the UK charts in 1985, and responsible for huge hit singles in Kayleigh, Lavender, and Heart of Lothian. By this time, Fish had ditched his trademark face paint, - the music and his sheer personality were a tour de force in them...
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MARILLION Videos (YouTube and more)


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MARILLION discography


Ordered by release date | Showing ratings (top albums) | Help Progarchives.com to complete the discography and add albums

MARILLION top albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

4.25 | 2209 ratings
Script for a Jester's Tear
1983
4.00 | 1516 ratings
Fugazi
1984
4.27 | 2387 ratings
Misplaced Childhood
1985
4.19 | 1514 ratings
Clutching at Straws
1987
3.77 | 1007 ratings
Seasons End
1989
3.15 | 768 ratings
Holidays in Eden
1991
3.99 | 1190 ratings
Brave
1994
3.83 | 807 ratings
Afraid Of Sunlight
1995
3.47 | 659 ratings
This Strange Engine
1997
2.77 | 591 ratings
Radiation
1998
3.11 | 557 ratings
Marillion.com
1999
3.39 | 635 ratings
Anoraknophobia
2001
4.11 | 1215 ratings
Marbles
2004
3.06 | 602 ratings
Somewhere Else
2007
3.36 | 637 ratings
Happiness Is The Road
2008
2.79 | 403 ratings
Less Is More
2009
3.63 | 708 ratings
Sounds That Can't Be Made
2012
3.74 | 453 ratings
F E A R (F*** Everyone And Run)
2016
4.00 | 243 ratings
An Hour Before It's Dark
2022

MARILLION Live Albums (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.88 | 358 ratings
Real to Reel
1984
3.88 | 356 ratings
The Thieving Magpie - La Gazza Ladra
1988
2.24 | 36 ratings
Live at the Borderline
1992
3.20 | 42 ratings
Live in Glasgow
1993
3.51 | 55 ratings
Live in Caracas
1993
4.12 | 113 ratings
Live From Loreley
1995
3.43 | 162 ratings
Made Again
1996
3.67 | 75 ratings
Live At The Walls
1998
3.63 | 45 ratings
Piston Broke
1998
3.08 | 31 ratings
Marillionrochester
1998
3.17 | 43 ratings
Zodiac
1999
3.79 | 90 ratings
Anorak in the UK Live
2002
4.07 | 56 ratings
Brave Live 2002
2003
3.40 | 16 ratings
Christmas In The Chapel
2003
4.50 | 56 ratings
Curtain Call - A Live Archive 1983 - 1988
2004
4.17 | 112 ratings
Marbles Live
2005
3.97 | 60 ratings
Marbles By The Sea
2005
3.69 | 48 ratings
Popular Music
2005
3.42 | 17 ratings
Bootleg Bingo
2005
3.65 | 44 ratings
Smoke
2006
3.79 | 51 ratings
Mirrors
2006
4.24 | 57 ratings
Family
2007
3.94 | 46 ratings
Friends
2007
3.64 | 38 ratings
Somewhere in London
2007
4.54 | 112 ratings
Early Stages: The Official Bootlegs 1982-1987
2008
4.57 | 124 ratings
Recital of the Script
2009
4.45 | 122 ratings
Live From Loreley
2009
4.09 | 35 ratings
Happiness Is Cologne
2009
3.64 | 31 ratings
High Voltage
2010
4.03 | 52 ratings
The Official Bootleg Box Set Vol. 2
2010
3.66 | 51 ratings
Tumbling Down The Years
2010
4.00 | 52 ratings
size matters
2010
3.82 | 30 ratings
Live In Montréal // Saturday
2010
3.81 | 28 ratings
Live In Montréal // Sunday
2010
3.74 | 27 ratings
Live In Montréal // Friday
2011
3.71 | 32 ratings
holidays in eden live
2011
4.14 | 57 ratings
Live From Cadogan Hall
2011
3.80 | 25 ratings
Afraid of Sunlight Live
2011
3.60 | 24 ratings
This Strange Engine Live
2011
3.71 | 26 ratings
Seasons End Live
2011
3.66 | 28 ratings
A-Z Live 2011
2012
3.87 | 43 ratings
Sounds Live
2012
3.67 | 23 ratings
The Glow Must Go On
2012
3.59 | 30 ratings
Clocks Already Ticking
2013
3.95 | 41 ratings
Brave Live 2013
2013
3.63 | 8 ratings
Best of Montréal
2013
3.50 | 6 ratings
Best of Leamington
2013
3.92 | 13 ratings
Live At The Forum
2014
3.94 | 32 ratings
Sunday Night Above the Rain
2014
3.60 | 10 ratings
A Monstrously Festive(al) Christmas
2015
4.45 | 20 ratings
Waves and Numb3rs
2016
3.91 | 31 ratings
Marbles in the Park
2016
4.36 | 22 ratings
Singles Night
2016
4.00 | 8 ratings
The Gold - Best of Convention 2017
2017
3.86 | 7 ratings
Live In Chile
2017
4.77 | 34 ratings
All One Tonight - Live at the Royal Albert Hall
2018
4.20 | 10 ratings
marillion.cl/viernes.noche
2019
3.80 | 10 ratings
marillion.cl/dotcom
2019
4.00 | 8 ratings
marillion.cl/en.marquee
2019
4.13 | 19 ratings
With Friends at St. David's
2021
4.65 | 8 ratings
Distant Lights - Port Zelande
2022
4.60 | 5 ratings
Distant Lights - Leicester
2022
0.00 | 0 ratings
An Hour Before It's Dark Live In Port Zelande 2023
2023

MARILLION Videos (DVD, Blu-ray, VHS etc)

4.38 | 186 ratings
Recital of the Script
1983
3.45 | 37 ratings
Video
1984
2.68 | 35 ratings
1982-86 The Videos
1986
3.74 | 35 ratings
A Singles Collection
1992
4.68 | 69 ratings
Brave Live 2002
2002
2.87 | 17 ratings
Shot In The Dark
2002
4.58 | 19 ratings
A Piss-up in a Brewery
2002
3.18 | 48 ratings
The EMI Singles Collection
2002
3.69 | 62 ratings
From Stoke Row To Ipanema - A Year In The Life (DVD)
2003
3.93 | 22 ratings
Christmas In The Chapel
2003
4.22 | 18 ratings
Before First Light (Afraid of Sunlight Live 2003)
2003
4.47 | 160 ratings
Live from Loreley
2004
4.01 | 84 ratings
Marbles On The Road
2004
2.80 | 58 ratings
Brave - The Film
2004
4.19 | 31 ratings
Wish You Were Here
2005
4.30 | 10 ratings
Colours And Sound
2006
4.21 | 61 ratings
Somewhere In London
2007
4.33 | 21 ratings
Bootleg Butlins
2007
3.73 | 13 ratings
Thank You Whoever You Are / Most Toys
2007
3.57 | 18 ratings
Something Else
2007
4.43 | 14 ratings
This Strange Convention
2009
4.67 | 6 ratings
M Tube: An Introduction To Marillion On DVD
2010
4.49 | 58 ratings
Out Of Season
2010
4.13 | 52 ratings
Live At Cadogan Hall
2011
4.61 | 28 ratings
Live In Montréal
2011
4.46 | 29 ratings
Holidays in Zelande
2012
4.08 | 35 ratings
Brave Live 2013
2013
4.80 | 15 ratings
A Sunday Night Above The Rain
2014
4.32 | 19 ratings
Breaking Records
2015
4.23 | 21 ratings
Out Of The Box
2016
4.74 | 19 ratings
Marbles in the Park
2016
4.84 | 36 ratings
All One Tonight
2018

MARILLION Boxset & Compilations (CD, LP, MC, SACD, DVD-A, Digital Media Download)

3.51 | 237 ratings
B'Sides Themselves
1988
0.00 | 0 ratings
B'Sides Themselves
1988
2.96 | 88 ratings
A Singles Collection - Six of One, Half a Dozen of the Other
1992
1.71 | 12 ratings
Marillion Music Collection
1993
4.11 | 18 ratings
The Originals
1995
2.88 | 46 ratings
Kayleigh
1996
3.78 | 11 ratings
The Best of Marillion
1996
3.12 | 6 ratings
Essential Collection
1996
3.41 | 60 ratings
The Best of Both Worlds
1997
4.08 | 105 ratings
Real to Reel - Brief Encounter
1997
3.09 | 13 ratings
Kayleigh - The Essential Collection
1998
2.21 | 64 ratings
Marillion and the Positive Light - Tales from the Engine Room
1998
4.03 | 55 ratings
The singles '82 - 88'
2000
3.20 | 11 ratings
Refracted! - From dusk 'till dot, Volume 1
2001
3.38 | 8 ratings
Another DAT at the Office
2001
3.10 | 10 ratings
Fall Out
2002
3.18 | 19 ratings
marillion.co.uk
2002
3.18 | 9 ratings
AWOL: A Marillion Solo Projects Sampler
2002
3.55 | 34 ratings
The singles '89- 95'
2002
4.00 | 8 ratings
The Best Of Marillion (EMI Compilation)
2003
3.24 | 6 ratings
Warm Wet Circles
2003
3.29 | 12 ratings
marillion.co.uk (2005 Version)
2005
3.27 | 7 ratings
Classics
2009
4.50 | 2 ratings
Keep The Noise Down
2010
4.19 | 12 ratings
Misplaced Childhood / Script For A Jester's Tear
2011
3.88 | 8 ratings
4 Albums
2011
3.67 | 6 ratings
Greatest Hits On CD & DVD
2012
4.21 | 19 ratings
Marillion.Best.Live
2012
3.92 | 13 ratings
Sounds That Can't Be Made Special Edition
2013
3.96 | 5 ratings
5 Album Set
2013
4.17 | 19 ratings
Early Stages : The Highlights
2013
2.38 | 7 ratings
Best Sounds
2014
4.29 | 26 ratings
A Sunday Night Above the Rain
2014
2.92 | 13 ratings
A Collection Of Recycled Gifts
2014
4.90 | 39 ratings
Misplaced Childhood
2017
4.72 | 28 ratings
Brave (Deluxe Edition, Limited Edition)
2018
4.80 | 32 ratings
Clutching At Straws
2018
4.11 | 44 ratings
With Friends from the Orchestra
2019
4.67 | 24 ratings
Afraid Of Sunlight (Limited Deluxe Edition)
2019
4.95 | 30 ratings
Script For A Jester's Tear (2020 Limited Deluxe Edition)
2020
4.87 | 27 ratings
Fugazi (2021 Limited Deluxe Edition)
2021
4.21 | 10 ratings
Holidays in Eden (2022 Limited Deluxe Edition)
2022
4.18 | 9 ratings
Seasons End deluxe edition
2023

MARILLION Official Singles, EPs, Fan Club & Promo (CD, EP/LP, MC, Digital Media Download)

3.91 | 133 ratings
Market Square Heroes
1982
3.74 | 59 ratings
Garden Party
1983
3.90 | 56 ratings
He Knows You Know
1983
3.91 | 55 ratings
Punch and Judy
1984
3.53 | 72 ratings
Assassing
1984
3.58 | 74 ratings
Kayleigh
1985
4.11 | 9 ratings
The Story So Far...
1985
3.79 | 68 ratings
Lavender
1985
3.50 | 65 ratings
Heart of Lothian
1985
2.72 | 78 ratings
Brief Encounter
1986
3.55 | 19 ratings
Garden Party Live
1986
3.68 | 37 ratings
Lady Nina
1986
4.01 | 48 ratings
Sugar Mice
1987
3.49 | 44 ratings
Incommunicado
1987
3.98 | 46 ratings
Warm Wet Circles
1987
3.00 | 24 ratings
Incommunicado & Sugar Mice - Video
1987
3.65 | 36 ratings
Freaks
1988
3.59 | 29 ratings
Uninvited Guest
1989
4.14 | 36 ratings
Easter
1989
3.17 | 30 ratings
hooks in you
1989
3.09 | 27 ratings
No One Can
1991
2.50 | 21 ratings
Cover My Eyes (Pain and Heaven)
1991
2.89 | 19 ratings
Dry Land
1991
2.75 | 8 ratings
No One Can
1992
3.59 | 27 ratings
Sympathy
1992
3.43 | 27 ratings
Sympathy
1992
3.50 | 16 ratings
No One Can
1992
4.10 | 10 ratings
The Hollow Man
1994
4.00 | 12 ratings
The Hollow Man
1994
3.69 | 13 ratings
Alone Again In The Lap Of Luxury
1994
3.92 | 12 ratings
Alone Again In The Lap Of Luxury
1994
3.73 | 26 ratings
Beautiful
1995
2.95 | 24 ratings
Beautiful
1995
4.06 | 24 ratings
The Making of Brave
1995
4.03 | 22 ratings
Man of a Thousand Faces
1997
3.70 | 20 ratings
Eighty Days
1997
2.98 | 22 ratings
These Chains (Single)
1998
3.00 | 8 ratings
Marillion & the Web Christmas 1998
1998
0.00 | 0 ratings
Marillion & The Web Christmas 1998 Happy Christmas Everybody!
1998
3.25 | 4 ratings
Rich
1999
3.42 | 12 ratings
Marillion.Christmas
1999
2.79 | 16 ratings
Marillion.co.uk
2000
3.70 | 10 ratings
Crash Course - An Introduction to Marillion
2001
2.73 | 17 ratings
A Verry Barry Christmas
2001
4.06 | 16 ratings
Between You And Me / Map Of The World
2001
3.86 | 19 ratings
Christmas 2000: A Piss-Up In A Brewery
2001
3.24 | 6 ratings
Front Row Club Issue 7
2002
4.13 | 6 ratings
Le Spectrum, Montréal, Canada, 6 September 1997 (Front Row Club 008)
2002
3.80 | 5 ratings
Christmas 2002: Santa And His Elvis
2002
4.00 | 1 ratings
Ludwigshalle, Dieburg, Germany 9 November 1998 - Front Row Club 1
2002
3.50 | 2 ratings
Caught in the Net - The Making of Marillion.com
2002
4.05 | 10 ratings
Say Cheese, Christmas With Marillion
2003
4.00 | 1 ratings
View From The Balcony (A Front Row Club Sampler)
2003
3.00 | 9 ratings
Christmas 2004: Baubles
2004
2.14 | 11 ratings
Remixomatosis
2004
3.50 | 2 ratings
The Damage (Live)
2004
4.20 | 5 ratings
Christmas 2005 : Merry Xmas To Our Flock
2005
2.49 | 12 ratings
A Handful Of Marbles
2005
3.33 | 3 ratings
Unzipped - The Making Of Anoraknophobia
2006
3.75 | 4 ratings
Christmas 2006: The Jingle Book
2006
3.00 | 2 ratings
See It Like a Baby
2007
4.00 | 4 ratings
Somewhere Elf - Christmas 2007
2007
2.70 | 14 ratings
Thank You Whoever You Are
2007
3.19 | 12 ratings
Thank You Whoever You Are / Most Toys
2007
4.00 | 6 ratings
ABC, Glasgow, Scotland. 9 November 2008
2008
3.75 | 4 ratings
The Basement, Newcastle, UK. 10 November 2008
2008
4.20 | 5 ratings
Colston Hall, Bristol, UK. 11 November 2008
2008
4.50 | 2 ratings
LMUSU, Leeds, UK. 13 November 2008
2008
4.50 | 2 ratings
Academy, Manchester, UK. 14 November 2008
2008
4.50 | 4 ratings
Opera House, Bournemouth, UK. 15 November 2008
2008
4.00 | 10 ratings
The Forum, London, UK. 19 November 2008
2008
4.50 | 2 ratings
JBs, Dudley, UK. 17 November 2008
2008
4.33 | 3 ratings
Rock City, Nottingham, UK. 18 November 2008
2008
2.42 | 3 ratings
De Waerdse Temple, Heerhugowaard, Netherlands. 21 November
2008
5.00 | 2 ratings
013, Tilburg, Netherlands. 23 November 2008
2008
5.00 | 2 ratings
Vereeniging, Nijmegen, Netherlands. 24 November 2008
2008
4.27 | 6 ratings
E-Werk, Cologne, Germany. 26 November 2008
2008
5.00 | 2 ratings
Le Splendid, Lille, France. 27 November 2008
2008
3.40 | 10 ratings
Christmas 2008: Pudding On The Ritz
2008
3.00 | 1 ratings
Whatever Is Wrong with You
2008
4.04 | 5 ratings
Happiness on the Road - Concorde 2 Brighton - 28 January 2009
2009
4.00 | 2 ratings
Christmas 2009: Snow De Cologne
2009
3.17 | 5 ratings
Crash Course
2009
4.00 | 2 ratings
Christmas 2010: Ding, Dong Loreley On High...
2010
4.00 | 2 ratings
Christmas 2011: Live At The German Space Day 2004
2011
3.33 | 3 ratings
Christmas 2012: Sleighed Again
2012
4.60 | 5 ratings
North American Tour 2012: Irwing Plaza, New York City, USA - 12 June 2012
2012
4.40 | 5 ratings
North American Tour 2012: Irwing Plaza, New York City, USA - 13 June 2012
2012
4.33 | 6 ratings
Crash Course
2013
3.39 | 12 ratings
The Carol Of The Bells
2013
4.00 | 2 ratings
Christmas 2013: Proggin' Around The Christmas Tree
2013
4.00 | 5 ratings
Christmas 2014: Chile For The Time Of Year
2014
3.00 | 1 ratings
Glass Half Full - The Making of Marbles
2015
4.00 | 3 ratings
The New Kings
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Festivities, Elation And Rejoicing! Christmas 2016
2016
0.00 | 0 ratings
Christmas At The Club (Christmas 2017)
2017
3.85 | 13 ratings
Living In F E A R
2017
3.00 | 2 ratings
A Star in the East Live in Japan 2018 (Xmas 2018)
2018
3.00 | 1 ratings
Unsound
2018
3.00 | 2 ratings
Mr Taurus - The Making of Somewhere Else
2019
3.00 | 2 ratings
Satellite Navigation - The Making of Happiness Is the Road
2019
3.00 | 1 ratings
Christmas 2020
2020
4.46 | 19 ratings
Be Hard on Yourself
2021
3.95 | 16 ratings
Murder Machines
2022

MARILLION Reviews


Showing last 10 reviews only
 Holidays in Eden by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 1991
3.15 | 768 ratings

BUY
Holidays in Eden
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Hector Enrique
Prog Reviewer

3 stars While the songs on "Season's End", the first Marillion album without Fish, were already ready before Steve Hogarth's arrival, "Holidays in Eden", the sixth album, is the first one where the singer really had a relevant participation in the definition of the band's new musical approach. A proposal of more linear and less intricate tonalities, on the way to finding their own identity and taking distance from their recent history. That is precisely what "Holidays in Eden" conveys, flying in winds closer to pop, turning at times into a work with little flavour and tinged with some flashes of greater elaboration.

Hogarth, who decisively tries to take charge of the situation although he is somewhat impostured, is accompanied by the calm keyboards of Mark Kelly and by the neat arpeggiated guitars and solos of the very correct Steve Rothery, generating an atmosphere of lightness and persistent accessibility throughout the album, getting closer to the commercial radio waves rather than to the canons of the progressive world, as is the case of the lively "Cover my Eyes", and the light "No One Can" and "Dry Land". Even the expectant title track with its catchy chorus fails to get off the ground.

Beyond the feeling that "Holidays in Eden" doesn't take any major risks, there are nevertheless some valuable passages: the opening, sorrowful "Splintering Heart", the acoustic chords of the melodic "Waiting to Happen", and the concluding "100 Nights" with an emotive guitar solo by Rothery backed by Ian Mosley's drums. Tracks that are enough for the album to scrape a pass mark, but not much more than that.

A new and definitive stage was underway for Marillion, and the hitherto little known Hogarth clearly assumed the musical leadership from "Holidays in Eden" onwards.

2.5/3 stars

 Live From Loreley by MARILLION album cover Live, 2009
4.45 | 122 ratings

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Live From Loreley
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by VianaProghead
Prog Reviewer

5 stars Review Nº 742

"Live From Loreley" is one of the many live albums from Marillion and that was released in 2009. It was recorded from a live concert performed at the Freilichtbuhne (Open-Air Stage), Loreley, St. Goarshausen, Germany, in 1987. The recordings of the album were taken during the supporting tour of their fourth studio album "Clutching At Straws", before an audience of about 18,000. Featuring Fish on vocals, and it was one his last live performances as a member of Marillion, it comprises songs of all four Marillion's studio albums from Fish's era, "Script For A Jester's Tear" released in 1983, "Fugazi" released in 1984, "Misplaced Childhood" released in 1985 and "Clutching At Straws" released in 1987. It comprises also the title track song of their debut EP and work, "Market Square Heroes" which was released in 1982.

The line up on "Live From Loreley" was the usual at the time for them: Fish (vocals), Steve Rothery (guitars), Mark Kelly (keyboards), Pete Trewavas (bass) and Ian Mosley (drums). It had also the participation of Cori Josias (backing vocals).

First of all I must say that my review is about the 2009 double audio CD version, which for the first time includes the entire live show. So, my version of "Live From Loreley" has eighteenth tracks. The album is divided into 2 Discs. Disc 1 has seven tracks: The first track "Slainte Mhath" was released on "Clutching At Straws". The second track "Assassing" was released on "Fugazi". The third track "Script For A Jester's Tear" was released on "Script For A Jester's Tear". The fourth track "White Russian" was released on "Clutching At Straws". The fifth track "Incubus" was released on "Fugazi". The sixth track "Sugar Mice" was released on "Clutching At Straws". The seventh track "Fugazi" was released on "Fugazi". Disc 2 has eleven tracks: The first track "Hotel Hobbies" was released on "Clutching At Straws". The second track "Warm Wet Circles" was also released on "Clutching At Straws". The third track "That Time Of The Night (The Short Straw)" was also released on "Clutching At Straws". The fourth track "Kayleigh" was released on "Misplaced Childhood". The fifth track "Lavender" was also released on "Misplaced Childhood". The sixth track "Bitter Suite (Medley)" was also released on "Misplaced Childhood". The seventh track "Heart Of Lothian" was also released on "Misplaced Childhood". The eighth track "The Last Straw" was released on "Clutching At Straws". The ninth track "Incommunicado" was also released on "Clutching At Straws". The tenth track "Garden Party" was released on "Script For A Jester's Tear". The eleventh track "Market Square Heroes" was released on their debut EP "Market Square Heroes" and it was the first song of its A side. It was also released as the A side of their debut single with the same name "Market Square Heroes". It was also released as the first song of the B side of their single "Punch And Judy".

"Live From Loreley" belongs to those days where prog bands like Marillion were among the highlights and played at Loreley. At the time, Marillion was then promoting their fourth studio album "Clutching At Straws" and still with Fish on vocals. At the time, they were at the commercial peak of their career. "Live From Loreley" has since been available on video and DVD, but the sound technically revised audio CD comes with more four additional tracks "White Russian", "Fugazi", "Garden Party" and "Market Square Heroes". But, even the revision cannot hide the fact that the concert on Loreley was primarily a very emotional live event, celebrated frenetically by 18,000 fans. Marillion always was a very successful live band because Marillion looked better lives, especially with Fish on vocals. The successful set list of the almost two hours of performance makes up for it, because whoever buys a live album shouldn't count on the intended perfection of the studio. And "Live From Loreley" really doesn't sound "reworked". Marillion brought what their fans wanted to the stage back then, a very successful mixture of classics and the current album at the time, which presented everything in a rocking way. Unfortunately, the booklet is a bit thin and only contains new liner notes by the master Derek William Dick. There could have been more, really. But, it will be always a great memory of the band in Fish's era.

Conclusion: "Live From Loreley" is a great live album. The live performance is fantastic and the choice of the tracks to be performed live is irreproachable, comprising all of their four studio albums, at the time. I prefer "Live From Loreley" to "Real To Reel" and "The Thieving Magpie ? La Gazza Ladra". It's true that "Real To Reel" is an excellent live album with a competent live performance but with little to distinguish the live tracks from the studio versions and where the vocal performance of Fish isn't as great as it should be. "The Thieving Magpie ? La Gazza Ladra" is also an excellent live album but has, for me, the inconvenient to be a live compilation recorded at different times and places, what takes away to its cohesion. So, "Live From Loreley" is with "Recital Of The Script" probably the best musical live testimonies from the band, comprising the Fish's era. Particularly, "Live From Loreley" is, without any doubt, an essential purchase because is an important live document that represents the end of an era and the born of another, into Marillion's career.

Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

 An Hour Before It's Dark by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 2022
4.00 | 243 ratings

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An Hour Before It's Dark
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

4 stars As I was starting to delve into the world of progressive rock, my dad recommended me to listen to an album called 'Misplaced Childhood' by some band named Marillion. Reluctantly, I listened to the album. From the first note of "Pseudo Silk Kimono," I was hooked and became a Marillion fan in 2018. That means that 'An Hour Before It's Dark' was the first Marillion album I listened to on the day of release. Not only that, but I pre-ordered the album. I received a special edition, signed digipack. This included the CD, a booklet full of magnificent artwork, and a making of DVD. But my favorite thing about pre-ordering the album was that when it arrived, I searched through all the names of the people who pre-ordered the album (because Marillion are cool like that) and contemplated mine once I spotted it. Even though it was minuscule, I felt like I contributed to the album in some way and was "credited." That was a very special moment for me.

'An Hour Before It's Dark' is the 20th studio album from Marillion, released on 4 March 2022. The band have expressed before that they didn't want 'An Hour Before It's Dark' to be another COVID record, which would date the album. However, Steve Hogarth has also said that it was nearly impossible for the affects of the pandemic to not creep into his lyrics, given its relevance to his personal life and the world as a whole.

'An Hour Before It's Dark' contains seven tracks, four of which are suites. The first suite and opening track, "Be Hard On Yourself," consists of three sections: i. The Tear in the Big Picture, ii. Lust for Luxury, and iii. You Can Learn. The second suite, "Reprogram the Gene," also consists of three sections: i. Invincible, ii. Trouble-Free Life, and iii. A Cure for Us? The penultimate track, "Sierra Leone," consists of five sections: i. Chance in a Million, ii. The White Sand, iii. The Diamond, iv. The Blue Warm Air, and v. More Than a Treasure. The closing track, "Care," consists of four sections: i. Maintenance Drugs, ii. An Hour Before It's Dark, iii. Every Cell, and iv. Angels on Earth.

Before I heard 'An Hour Before It's Dark,' I wasn't sure what to expect. The previous record, 'FEAR,' was a massive disappointment for me and is probably my least favorite Marillion record. Nevertheless, 'FEAR' was released six years before the release of 'An Hour Before It's Dark.' Not only has a decent amount of time passed, but a lot has happened within those six years. The tracklist of this album reflects that of 'FEAR' due to the multipart suite format, which was worrisome. However, all of my doubts dissipated the moment I heard the opening track, "Be Hard On Yourself."

Finally, we're back into the heaviness and grandiosity that was last seen on 'Sounds That Can't Be Made.' The urgency of the lyrics are reflected in the accompaniment well. "Be Hard On Yourself" is more cohesive than any of the suites from 'FEAR.' The following track, "Reprogram the Gene," is my least favorite song on 'An Hour Before It's Dark." In my opinion, the music doesn't flow well. This is especially apparent when hearing the abrupt shift between "Invincible" and "Trouble-Free Life." I also dislike the constant references to Greta Thunberg, or Greta "T," which take me out of the music slightly.

"Only a Kiss" is a 40-second instrumental prelude to "Murder Machines." I like the espionage atmosphere created in this brief interlude which bleeds seamlessly into "Murder Machines." This is a beautifully crafted rock song with a melancholic undertone. The Choir Noir and the In Praise of Folly String Quartet are featured on the ethereal "The Crow and the Nightingale." This song sounds enormous with the vast instrumentation, almost like it could be used in a soundtrack. Steve Rothery's guitar solo on "The Crow and the Nightingale" is one of his absolute best.

"Sierra Leone" is an extended piece that's driven by Mark Kelly's piano and acts as a foil to the climactic track that preceded it. Ten minutes might be a bit long for a mellow piece such as this, but I do enjoy parts of it. The 15-minute closing track, "Care," is similar to "The Leavers" in the sense that everything leading up to the final section (in this case, "Angels on Earth") is somewhat forgettable, but the final section is excellent.

In conclusion, Marillion prove that they still have a lot of creativity left in them with the release of 'An Hour Before It's Dark.' Despite the heavy subject matter that's explored on this album, the music is surprisingly upbeat. For a band that has been around as long as Marillion, I am truly astonished with how they can continue to release wonderful music that moves me. I am also pleased to hear that Marillion didn't continue going down the 'FEAR' path and produced something that was different, while still containing elements of past works. There are some minor criticisms I have that are found throughout the album, such as lack of cohesiveness in most of the suites. The biased side of me wants to rate 'An Hour Before It's Dark' five stars. However, I must give this album four stars, for reasons previously mentioned.

 F E A R (F*** Everyone And Run) by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 2016
3.74 | 453 ratings

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F E A R (F*** Everyone And Run)
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

1 stars I could vitriolically review this egregious album blow-by-blow, but I'll refrain as I'm not into sadomasochism. All I will say is that 'FEAR' is my absolute least favorite album from Marillion. I don't understand the hype that this album has received. Every song meanders aimlessly and stagnantly, ultimately going nowhere. Many of these songs should've been heavily revised or scrapped entirely. Marillion are also great at writing melodies, and the melodies on this album are extremely poor for their standards. In addition, I don't feel that 'FEAR' showcases the incredible musicianship of Marillion, as no musician is given a chance to shine throughout it's bloated 70-minute duration. I detest the title of the album. Steve Hogarth claims that they didn't choose the title for shock value; that's BS. I hate to malign an album from one of my favorite bands, but nothing can change the fact that 'FEAR' is appalling. I have no choice but to rate this album one star. F this album and run.
 Sounds That Can't Be Made by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 2012
3.63 | 708 ratings

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Sounds That Can't Be Made
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

5 stars 'Sounds That Can't Be Made' is the 17th studio album by Marillion, released on 17 September 2012. The album opens with the epic, 17-minute "Gaza." This is one of the heaviest songs by Marillion, not only musically, but lyrically too. "Gaza" is among the most overtly political Marillion songs, along with "Forgotten Sons" (from 'Script for a Jester's Tear') and "The King of Sunset Town" (from 'Seasons End'). The lyrics are told from the perspective of a boy growing up in the Gaza Strip. Steve Hogarth apparently had a lyric for "Gaza," but was hesitant to use it. He didn't want to be perceived as a privileged British man talking about world issues. After many conversations with Palestinians living in the refugee camps of Gaza and the West Bank, Hogarth gained the confidence to use the original lyrics for "Gaza." I will refrain from sharing my two cents on the ongoing issue, as this is not the time or place to be doing so. However, I used to have some issues with "Gaza" that hindered my ability to fully enjoy it. As time passes, I enjoy the song more, as it truly is a beautiful piece filled with breathtaking moments.

The first minute of "Gaza" is ambient, and then the band enter. Steve Rothery plays an interesting guitar riff in 7/4. The music conveys a sense of foreboding. The music shifts to an ethereal bit with Steve Hogarth's pretty falsetto vocals. The music returns to the original guitar riff, this time with copious distortion. Ian Mosley's drumming is powerful during this section. As this opening section dissipates, the music settles in a more traditional Marillion sound. Then, Ian Mosley plays a heavy drumbeat, indicating the impending heaviness. Pete Trewavas enters with possibly his heaviest, most distorted bass riff ever recorded. Mark Kelly's synth tones has a similar timbre to that of a trumpet. Once this section ends, Pete Trewavas plays slap bass subtly while Steve Rothery plays atmospheric guitar melodies. The band slowly crescendos to another melodic section. After this, Mark Kelly plays a beautiful chord progression on piano that accompanies Steve Hogarth's vocals as he sings "it just ain't right..." Then, the whole band enters as Steve Rothery plays an emotional guitar solo. The coda ends the song on a sombre, yet intense note. The ending acapella lyric, "someday surely someone must help us," finishes the mammoth track strongly.

The title track is one of my favorite songs on 'Sounds That Can't Be Made.' I like the backing vocals on this song. Mark Kelly's synth tones add a futuristic element to the music. He also plays a keyboard solo that transitions into the grandiose coda; one of the album's many high points. I love the lyric, "only love can stop you from merely existing." "Pour My Love" doesn't sound like any other Marillion song. It's a great, soothing pop song. The following track, "Power," starts with great atmosphere. Pete Trewavas' bassline stands out right away. The chorus contains a gorgeous melody sung by Steve Hogarth. As the title suggests, the song is about power and the ways that it can be abused.

In my opinion, "Montreal" is one of the most underrated Marillion songs. It's the second of the three epics on 'Sounds That Can't Be Made.' Some people don't like Hogarth's lyrics and their conversational tone, as if they're taken from a journal entry. The song also feels like it was written stream of consciousness. However, all of these aspects of "Montreal" are part of why I love it and view it as a stunning centerpiece of 'Sounds That Can't Be Made.' I love the section containing the lyrics, "Welcome back to Montreal," as it makes me feel like I'm home. Marillion return to progressive territory during the 7/4 section with the lyrics, "We were invited to the circus..." The concluding section is nothing short of moving. The music gradually crescendos into an overwhelming climax as Steve Hogarth sings, "Je t'aime my darling." The last two sections are structurally similar to the last couple sections of "The Invisible Man" from 'Marbles.' I like how the lyrics convey the positive side of touring, which isn't talked about much.

"Invisible Ink" is a brilliant foil to "Montreal," and like "Pour My Love," is a wonderful pop song with infectious melodies. I like the little touch of xylophone and how it plays the same melody that Steve Hogarth sings during the chorus. The heavy opening riff of "Lucky Man" reminds me of 'Abbey Road' by the Beatles, particularly the songs "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" or the Abbey Road medley. "Lucky Man" is a catchy rock song that starkly transitions into the final track, "The Sky Above the Rain."

"The Sky Above the Rain" is the third and final epic of 'Sounds That Can't Be Made.' This is another Marillion song that I consider to be extremely underrated. Steve Hogarth's heartbreaking vocals and Mark Kelly's piano accompaniment together are exquisite. On the surface, "The Sky Above the Rain" is a melancholic ballad, but hidden beneath the tears are glimmers of hope. Steve Rothery's lead guitar embellishments and soloing complements the atmosphere of the song perfectly. The uplifting 6/4 coda ends 'Sounds That Can't Be Made' with optimism.

In conclusion, 'Sounds That Can't Be Made' is one of the most accessible and mature Marillion albums. I didn't know that these were sounds that could be made, but I'm glad they were. Thank you, Marillion.

 Less Is More by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 2009
2.79 | 403 ratings

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Less Is More
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

3 stars 'Less Is More' is an acoustic album from Marillion, released on 2 October 2009. It contains rearranged songs dating back to 1989 as well as a previously unreleased song entitled "It's Not Your Fault" and a hidden live track, "Cannibal Surf Babe." Marillion have performed numerous acoustic live sets long before the release of 'Less Is More,' including 'Live at the Walls' (1998) and the concert DVD 'A Piss-Up In a Brewery' (2002). Perhaps the positive reception of their acoustic gigs galvanized Marillion to release an acoustic studio album. The less-is-more approach to these arrangements does not only apply to the stripped down instrumentation, but also the duration of the songs. Each song on 'Less Is More' are shorter than their studio counterparts. Marillion started incorporating more percussion instruments on the previous album, 'Happiness Is the Road,' and they continue that on 'Less Is More.' The diverse, timbral palette that is utilized on 'Less Is More' makes it stand out in their discography.

Before I heard a note of 'Less Is More,' I was surprised and simultaneously disappointed after contemplating the bizarre tracklist. Of all the reinterpretations included on 'Less Is More,' there are no songs from 'Marbles' or 'Somewhere Else,' and only one song was taken from 'Happiness Is the Road.' I find it odd that Marillion chose to omit all songs, with the exception of one, from their three previous albums. Especially considering that there are three songs from 'Anoraknophobia' included on 'Less Is More,' and that it one of my least favorite Marillion albums. Typically, when a notable band does an acoustic album like this, they choose songs that are fan favorites. It's safe to say that Marillion did not use this method, which in some ways I respect.

The first two tracks of 'Less Is More' are "Go!" and "Interior Lulu," which are both taken from 'Marillion.com.' 'Marillion.com' is my least favorite Marillion album. Nevertheless, I was curious to see what changes the band would make to the arrangements of these two songs, especially the latter. I actually enjoy the track "Go!" as it is. The 'Less Is More' version of "Go!" is arranged as a lullaby, though the difference between this and the original version are not drastic. "Interior Lulu" is one of my least favorite epics, let alone songs, from Marillion. Unfortunately, this new version hasn't changed my mind of the song.

"Out of This World" (from 'Afraid of Sunlight') is probably in my top three Marillion songs. While the 'Less Is More' version is good, it doesn't enhance my enjoyment of the song. Many elements of what made the original version of "Out of This World" exquisite isn't captured here. The ragtime feel of "The Space" (from 'Seasons End') is performed on 'Less Is More' similarly to the performance on 'Live at the Walls.' I was curious to hear Marillion's interpretation of "Hard as Love" (from 'Brave') as that is a heavy rock song. The 'Less Is More' version is in a major key, making it sound happy. If you know the album 'Brave' and the lyrics of "Hard as Love" in particular, it's strange to hear the juxtaposition of the accompaniment and the lyrics.

The next two tracks were taken from 2001s 'Anoraknophobia.' The new chord progression of "Quartz" completely changes the vibe of the song from how Marillion fans are used to hearing it. Especially during the rap, which is melancholic and significantly slower than the original. The new version of "If My Heart Were a Ball It Would Roll Uphill" is jazzy, which is a genre Marillion tend to stray away from, but I think it works in this context. The unreleased song, "It's Not Your Fault," features just piano and Steve Hogarth's vocals. The chord progression is sorrowful. Unfortunately, "It's Not Your Fault" is my least favorite song on the album. I find it to be uninspired.

"Memory of Water" (from 'This Strange Engine') has a folk element due to the interwoven, arpeggiated acoustic guitars. I wish that Marillion utilized more of this style with the other songs on 'Less Is More.' This may be my favorite rendition of the whole album for its sheer beauty. "This Is the 21st Century" (from 'Anoraknophobia') underwent a massive transformation from the original version, which was dependent on Steve Rothery's electric guitar pedal effects and Ian Mosley's modern-sounding drumbeat. Now, 'Less Is More' allows the listener to hear the essence of "This Is the 21st Century" without all the fancy ornamentation. The chorus inventively switches from a simple meter to a compound meter in this version. The final hidden track, "Cannibal Surf Babe," ends the album on an enthusiastic note and works well as an acoustic piece.

In conclusion, 'Less Is More' is a good album to put on as background music, but not an album that I would attentively listen to. The music is dull. However, that seemed to be intentional. Most songs of the tracklist don't augment my enjoyment of the original versions of these songs, nor do they provide anything new. That's why I don't return to this album frequently.

 Happiness Is The Road by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 2008
3.36 | 637 ratings

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Happiness Is The Road
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

5 stars During the 'Somewhere Else' tour, Steve Hogarth's mental health was suffering from his domestic situation (recent divorce) and professional (touring). His body mutinied, causing him to need surgery. On the afternoon of a show in Holland, Hogarth was referred to a doctor in Utrecht who performed a minor operation. The doctor was also a healer and after the surgical operation, he held his hands over Hogarth. He noticed that there were tears rolling down the doctor's face. Afterwards, the doctor said that the tears were Hogarth's, not his. Vicariously, he had felt the pain that burdened Hogarth. The doctor then recommended a book for Hogarth to read and wrote the name of it on his prescription pad. The book is 'The Power of Now' by Eckhart Tolle. The book resonated with Hogarth as it aligned with his own intrinsic views of the meaning of life. 'Happiness Is the Road,' specifically the first volume, 'Essence,' was directly inspired by the book.

'Happiness Is the Road' is Marillion's 15th studio album, released in 2008 as two separate volumes entitled 'Essence' and 'The Hard Shoulder,' respectively. Overall, the playing time for 'Happiness Is the Road' is 116 minutes, making it the longest Marillion album in duration. Due to the format, 'Happiness Is the Road' feels like a more logical album to follow 2004s 'Marbles' as opposed to 2007s 'Somewhere Else.' Like 'Marbles' and its predecessor, 'Anoraknophobia,' the recording for 'Happiness Is the Road' was financed by pre-ordering.

'Essence' is somewhat of a concept album in the sense that each of the songs hang together loosely from a general concept, rather than a narrative story. 'The Hard Shoulder' is a collection of songs that was intended to be the complete album. During the recording sessions of 'Happiness Is the Road,' the band experienced a surge of inspiration which resulted in the writing of 'Essence.' Both volumes have a yin and yang relationship. 'Essence' is mellower and similar in style to 'Somewhere Else,' whereas 'The Hard Shoulder' is played more in the style of rock. Personally, I prefer 'Essence' to 'The Hard Shoulder.' I wonder if it would've been more beneficial for Marillion to release both volumes as separate albums, rather than using 'Happiness Is the Road' as an umbrella for both. Nevertheless, the final product is beautiful beyond words.

'Essence' opens with the shortest track, "Dreamy Street." The opener acts as a prelude that smoothly transitions into the album. "Dream Street" contains just Mark Kelly's piano and Steve Hogarth's vocals. The chord progression of the song has jazzy elements that surprised me on first listen. The first proper song, "This Train Is My Life," is a beautiful song that manages to compact so much emotion and power in less than five minutes. I like the metaphor of our lives as trains, which is what the title and lyrics convey. 'Essence' is one of my favorite Marillion songs with a wonderful climax at the end during the "sit in silence and watch the sky" lyric. I love the lyric, "live in the moment or you'll never be free." The memorable melodies and temporal lyrics of "Wrapped Up In Time" are beautiful. The syncopated keyboard ostinato paired with the opposing rhythm section on "Liquidity" creates a strange, but interesting groove.

The coda to "Nothing Fills the Hole" reminds me of one of the title tracks of 'Marbles,' which brilliantly crescendos into "Woke Up." This is probably the most straight-ahead rock song on the album that is perfect for driving out in the country with the windows down, something I've definitely done before. Steve Hogarth's vocals soar on this song. The ending of "Woke Up" has a Middle Eastern flair due to the snake charmer keyboard melody and exotic percussion. I interpret the lyrics of "Woke Up" being about that person or thing that alone makes you want to get up in the morning. "Trap the Spark" is another beautifully melodic song about living in the moment rather than being a slave to one's past. "A State of Mind" reminds me of "See It Like a Baby" from the previous album, 'Somewhere Else.' The similitude is mainly apparent in the verse with Ian Mosley's drumming style. This is one of the weaker tracks in my opinion. However, I do love the lyrics, as one's state of mind can affect one's happiness, leading us perfectly into the ten minute title track. The first three minutes features just Mark Kelly's synths and Steve Hogarth's whispery vocals. Once the drums and bass enter, I'm reminded of "Neverland" from 'Marbles.' Marillion have always written songs through jamming. This method of composition is especially apparent on "Happiness Is the Road." The groove laid down by one of my favorite rhythm sections, Ian Mosley and Pete Trewavas, is absolute perfection. Steve Hogarth's voice soars even more on the chorus of "Happiness Is the Road." One of Hogarth's best lyrics is "your mind will find a way to be unkind to you somehow." This has always been one of my favorite Marillion songs. There is a hidden track at the end of the first volume entitled "Half Full Jam." This is probably one of the heaviest Marillion songs.

'The Hard Shoulder' opens with 'Thunder Fly,' which picks up nicely where 'Essence' ended, as this song is another jam. "Thunder Fly" goes back and forth between hard rock passages and beautiful choruses, culminating into a gorgeous coda with spectacular vocal harmonies and a grandiose Steve Rothery guitar solo. "The Man From the Planet Marzipan" is Marillion at their most zany. Pete Trewavas' slap bass and Mark Kelly's futuristic keyboard tones makes 'The Man From the Planet Marzipan" one of the most unique Marillion songs. I like the concept of a stranger in a strange land that is explored lyrically in this song and how the music reflects that. As the song progresses, the music and lyrics become more melancholic. The main refrain of "The Man From the Planet Marzipan" is quite epic.

Steve Rothery really shines on the nearly ten-minute "Asylum Satellite 1" with his chorus lead guitar playing. Steve Rothery is one of my favorite guitar players, and his contribution to this track alone makes it one of the many highlights of 'Happiness Is the Road.' Like the lyrics of "The Man From the Planet Marzipan," "Asylum Satellite 1" has a cosmic element, and the atmosphere of the music complements that theme.

There are some forgettable tracks on 'The Hard Shoulder,' such as "Older Than Me," "Throw Me Out," and "Especially True." Given the length of 'Happiness Is the Road,' I view these weak tracks as superfluous. "Older Than Me" sounds like a lullaby and lyrically references the song "Over the Hills and Far Away" by Led Zeppelin. The heavy guitar riff during the coda of "Especially True" saves the song from being completely negligible. "Half the World" and "Whatever Is Wrong With You" are the most accessible songs on 'Happiness Is the Road.' The former is a pleasant pop song with a singalong chorus. The latter, however, is one of the best mainstream rock songs Marillion has ever written. The fact that "Whatever Is Wrong With You" didn't break big (not that Marillion would necessarily want that) is unbelievable. This song is instantly catchy and makes me forget that Marillion are a neo-prog band, and I mean that as a massive compliment.

My favorite song on 'Happiness Is the Road' is the final track of the second volume, "Real Tears for Sale." The tragic lyrics hark back to concepts explored on 1995s 'Afraid of Sunlight.' I think of all the Hollywood stars whose fame, literally in certain cases, killed them. People tend to place celebrities on a pedestal like they're gods when, in reality, they're no different than the rest of us. I love the slow build that crescendos into the powerful climax at the end of the song. Steve Rothery's guitar soloing, as always, is phenomenal. Ian Mosley shows off his intense drumming side, reminding me of earlier Marillion tracks like "King."

In conclusion, 'Happiness Is the Road' is a Marillion masterpiece. Marillion tend to release their best albums when they're feeling ambitious. This is certainly true for 'Happiness Is the Road.' Parts of this album speak to the very core of my being, and I love the profound concept of 'Essence.' While there may be a couple weaker tracks on 'The Hard Shoulder,' they're not weak enough for me to rate it any less than five stars.

 Somewhere Else by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 2007
3.06 | 602 ratings

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Somewhere Else
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

3 stars Marillion had the unfathomable task of following up their magnum opus 'Marbles,' released in 2004. Fortunately, this has not been the first time. Marillion followed up 'Misplaced Childhood' with 'Clutching at Straws' (masterpiece), and 'Brave' with 'Afraid of Sunlight' (also a masterpiece). 'Somewhere Else' is the fourteenth studio album by Marillion, released on 9 April 2007. Unlike their previous two albums, Marillion did not ask their fans to pre-order 'Somewhere Else' before it was recorded because they didn't need the money. This left some fans disappointed as their was no special edition available. However, a deluxe edition was issued on 25 April 2011 containing a 36-page digibook with additional artwork designed by Carl Glover. The cover features a tower viewer, also known as coin-operated binoculars.

One major observation I have of 'Somewhere Else' that makes it stand out in the Marillion discography is that it's the mellowest Marillion album. When I say mellow, I don't necessarily say that as a critique of the album. Perhaps that's why it took me so long to fully grasp 'Somewhere Else.' It's not an immediate album like many other great Marillion albums. This is apparent from the first track, "The Other Half," to the final track, "Faith." The only heavy rock song on 'Somewhere Else' is "Most Toys," which unfortunately stands out like a sore thumb in the tracklist. Overall, 'Somewhere Else' has a distinct vibe that I generally enjoy. There are many Marillion fans who've maligned this album, but, similar to 'Radiation,' I think that 'Somewhere Else' is a solid release from the band and deserves more appreciation.

The opening track, "The Other Half," is, as the title suggests, a song of two halves. The first couple minutes are raucous and showcases Ian Mosley's powerful drumming skills. His cymbal-work washes over the listener, creating a beautiful wall of sound. The song then diminuendos into the second half which starts jazzy and then morphs into a gorgeous climax that features a Steve Rothery guitar solo. The next track, "See It Like a Baby," starts with inventive Ian Mosley drumming and a prominent Pete Trewavas arpeggiated bassline, which provides a formidable foundation for the verses. I love the open chords that Steve Rothery strums during the chorus. The only word I can think of to describe the chorus is "refreshing." Towards the end, Steve Rothery plays a lead guitar ostinato which Steve Hogarth mimics vocally and harmonizes over. Structurally, "See It Like a Baby" is incredibly simple as it switches between the verse and the chorus for the whole song. The sentiment of the song is captured in the title alone. As we grow older, it's easy to become desensitized to certain things. "See It Like a Baby" explains that trying to forget certain things ironically helps us truly remember them.

"Thank You Whoever You Are" is a piano-driven pop song with an interesting chord progression and a beautiful chorus. The aforementioned rock song of the album, "Most Toys," is one of my least favorite songs on 'Somewhere Else.' The title is based on the quote, "He who dies with the most toys wins." The lyrical refrain of "Most Toys" states that "he who dies with the most toys is still dead," meaning that life isn't a competition.

The title track is my favorite song on the album, and one of my favorite Marillion songs of all time. The accompaniment perfectly matches the sensitivity of Steve Hogarth's vocals. Hogarth's lyrics are painfully real and introspective. He refers to himself as "Mr. Taurus" as that is his zodiac sign and uses a Mr. Blue Sky-esque vocal effect, which may have been intentional. He poignantly describes his feelings of loneliness by stating "everyone I love lives somewhere else." The climax at the end is extremely powerful and emotional.

"A Voice from the Past" starts off subdued, but then gradually builds to an explosive climax. The lyrics are angry and cynical, which is a mood Hogarth would stick to on subsequent albums such as 2016s 'FEAR.' A song that always comes to mind when I hear "No Such Thing" is "Planet Caravan" by Black Sabbath. Both songs capture similar atmospheres, which is especially apparent with the vocal effects.

The album gets a bit rockier with the track "The Wound." The lyrics initially describe the wound as a physical thing. As the lyrics progress, it becomes apparent that the wound is causing emotional pain, and is used metaphorically. The groove towards the end of the track reminds me of songs from the following album, 'Happiness Is the Road,' particularly the track "Asylum Satellite 1." The next track, "The Last Century for Man," is one of my least favorite tracks on the album. I find the song uninspired and ultimately forgettable, musically and lyrically.

The closing track, "Faith," is a pastiche of the song "Blackbird" by The Beatles. If the fingerpicked acoustic guitar wasn't enough to convince you that fact, Marillion covered "Blackbird" on their acoustic live album 'Live at the Walls.' The band had been playing "Faith" years before the release of 'Somewhere Else.' Like "Most Toys," it's another song that sticks out like a sore thumb, as it's completely different from anything Marillion has ventured into musically. The unexpected tropical bridge seems like it was shoehorned in. Sam Morris plays French horn on this track towards the end, bringing the album to a melancholic end.

In conclusion, 'Somewhere Else' is a transitional Marillion album. It's the one that's sandwiched between 'Marbles' and 'Happiness Is the Road,' which are both among my favorite albums from Marillion. I respect the band for not trying to churn out another 'Marbles.' The band took elements from 'Marbles' and tried to write shorter, simpler songs. In the end, what we get on 'Somewhere Else' is a mixed bag of songs ranging from mediocre to exquisite, which makes for an interesting listen. On a great day, I would give 'Somewhere Else' four stars. Generally, I will give this three stars.

 Live At The Walls by MARILLION album cover Live, 1998
3.67 | 75 ratings

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Live At The Walls
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Magog2112

4 stars 'Live at the Walls' is a live album by Marillion. It was recorded in a small restaurant in Oswestry on 25 and 26 June 1998 as an acoustic set. The band debuted two songs from their upcoming album at the time, 'Radiation.' Those songs would be "Now She'll Never Know" and "The Answering Machine." There are also three live covers included on 'Live at the Walls.' They covered "Fake Plastic Trees" by Radiohead, "Blackbird" by The Beatles, and "Abraham, Martin and John" by Dick Holler.

After the performance for "Runaway" ends, Steve Hogarth talks to the audience. He claims that prior to the gig, Marillion made a deal with the restaurant. The band would be able to get a free meal and some beers in exchange for a live performance that the locals would be able to see. Once this information got out, Marillion fans from all around the world found their way to the small town of Oswestry to hear the band perform. The response was so great that the band thought to tape the show.

One major aspect of 'Live at the Walls' that I love is the inclusion of obscure Marillion tracks that are rarely performed live. Most people's favorite Marillion tracks are ones that are climactic and powerful, as that's what the band excel at. This live album features subdued and intimate songs that don't get as much recognition, which I think is a reason in of itself to purchase this live album. The songs in question are "Beyond You," "Afraid of Sunrise," "Now She'll Never Know," "The Answering Machine," and "Eighty Days." I particularly loved hearing "Now She'll Never Know," which, in my opinion, is one of the most underrated Marillion songs. Steve Hogarth's extremely intimate vocals are what makes this song truly special. I wouldn't normally associate "Now She'll Never Know" as sounding similar to Radiohead's "Fake Plastic Trees" except for the fact that they're both performed on this album.

The acoustic arrangements of "Alone Again in the Lap of Luxury," "The Space," and "Hooks in You" are quite different from how they're usually performed. All three songs are played in a ragtime style. I was surprised to see "King" in the setlist, as that is the heaviest Marillion song, in my opinion. "King" must be played loud and has no place in an acoustic set. Nevertheless, Mark Kelly's Hammond organ elevates this live performance.

After hearing Marillion's cover of "Abraham, Martin and John," I knew that that song was probably what inspired the band to write "Born to Run," which is on 'Radiation.' Steve Rothery's guitar soloing is soulful and imbued with emotion.

Marillion end the concert with the song "Eight Days" from 'This Strange Engine.' I like the choice they made of making this the final song as it's a song dedicated to their incredible fans.

In conclusion, 'Live at the Walls' is a great unplugged live album that I would recommend to fans of this period of Marillion's history. It's refreshing to listen to an album such as 'Live at the Walls' that stands out among the band's seemingly endless discography, let alone live discography. Acoustic sets may not be for everyone, but it provides an interesting contrast to what Marillion fans are used to hearing through songs that are heavily transformed from the original versions.

 Seasons End by MARILLION album cover Studio Album, 1989
3.77 | 1007 ratings

BUY
Seasons End
Marillion Neo-Prog

Review by Hector Enrique
Prog Reviewer

4 stars It was a gloomy outlook for Marillion after the difficult departure of singer and frontman Fish following the successful "Clutching at Straws", creating uncertainty about the band's continuity. But Steve Rothery and his bandmates shuffled their cards again, rearranged themselves and called in a little-known Steve Hogarth for the complicated task of replacing the Scottish giant. Predictably, the expectations and the spotlight were on the band's fifth album and first of its second life: "Seasons End", and above all on what the new singer could bring to the table. And Hogarth's landing was soft and comfortable, partly because the album's instrumentation bears similarities to the structures and musicality of previous works (after all, except for Fish, the musicians were still the same and their formula was already working), partly because many of the songs were developed previously, and partly because the new singer was just starting out and his influence at the time was minor.

The band would thus begin a new stage, respecting their recent past but determined to oxygenate it with new airs. Hence, the pieces show that fusion of recognisable notes in a more calm and suspenseful atmosphere, sprinkled with dramatic touches and nourished by a reflective theme on politics, the environment and human relations. That tessitura is present practically throughout the entire album: from the opening and soaring "The King of Sunset Town", the beautiful acoustic and arpeggiated beginnings of "Eastern" and "After Me", the forceful half-time of the intense "Seasons End", one of the jewels of the album along with the sordid "Berlin" and the suffocated saxophone of guest Phil Tood, to the martial "The Space". The band's tucking in of Hogarth's expansive vocal range and histrionics is remarkable, with Rothery flawlessly executing his clean, sustained guitar solos, accompanied by Mark Kelly's typically eighties synths to create a crystalline musical layer, both backed by Pete Trewavas' bass and Ian Mosley's consistent drumming.

The transitional "Seansons End", beyond the change of command that generated controversy among the band's followers (similar to what happened with Genesis and Peter Gabriel), is a good album and deserves to be evaluated considering the context in which it was conceived. From the next album onwards, Hogarth's preponderance would start to gain much more space in the decisions about the musical direction Marillion should follow.

3,5 stars

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