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Pink Floyd - Wish You Were Here CD (album) cover

WISH YOU WERE HERE

Pink Floyd

Psychedelic/Space Rock


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thorsten.ill@
4 stars There is not much left to say about this classic piece of art rock. "Shine on you crazy diamond" made it into every teenager party, after 11 p.m., "Wish you were here" also. Hundreds of band tried to copy them, but they never reached the quality of the Pink Floyd of the mid seventies. Still a worth bargain it is !!!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8799)
Posted Sunday, December 14, 2003 | Review Permalink
maani
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Founding Moderator
5 stars How do you follow-up a global masterpiece like Dark Side? You change the rules. If Dark Side is about the uncatharted madness caused as a result of living in an insane world, Wish You Were Here is about the added madness that ensues as a result of having the world embrace that uncatharted madness on such an absurd scale. If WYWH is a "tribute to Syd Barrett," it is so because Barrett saw that insanity first. But WYWH is also a scathing remonstration of the music industry - a deliberate, mocking attempt to "bite the hand that feeds." And the album succeeds on both levels, as well as, most importantly, on the compositional and musical levels. Not only did Shine On and Wish You Were Here become anthems on a global scale, but the sales of Ovation guitars went through the roof when everyone old enough to play a guitar began playing these songs at every acid-laced party in the world. Floyd was not interested in "topping" themselves after Dark Side; they were simply interested in expressing new thoughts and feelings - and in that they succeeded brilliantly.

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Send comments to maani (BETA) | Report this review (#8791)
Posted Tuesday, January 06, 2004 | Review Permalink
Sean Trane
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Prog Folk
5 stars Wish I'd Been There

How does one follow the success of DSOTM without making a carbon copy of the successful album? Well, you reinvent yourself completely, something that Floyd constantly did throughout their first two decades: you'd be hard pressed to find two albums that are similar until their early-80's breakdown. This is not to say that the genesis of this album was an easy one, contrarily to Dark Side's. Indeed by early 74, three tracks had been written, including Raving And Drooling (future Sheep) and You Gotta Be Crazy (future Dogs) and what would become the Crazy diamond suite. As often the case with Floyd, all three tracks had been tested live during their tours, but in January 75, the group went in the studio to record the future album. But in the middle of the recording sessions, Waters will toss out the Raving and Gotta Be pieces, keeping the Crazy Diamond pieces that will become the new backbone. From this new blueprint, the general line of the album will be absence and an attack on the music industry.

The absence part is a bit of an autobiographical theme, with Syd Barrett's ghost appearing a second time (see my review of Dark Side's Brain Damage), further accredited by the interested party's impromptu visit, by the Floyd members not really recognizing him (so the legend has it), but it also about Floyd own emptiness in recent tours and laborious (as if they were elsewhere) studio sessions. The attack on the musical industry theme is grafted on that Syd theme (since the former is the culprit in Syd's fall) and would be the centre of the album, the Crazy Diamonds book-ending it. Musically this album is a bit of a return to pre-Dark Side with long instrumental passages, at least in the suite.

The first instalment of Shine On You is built mostly on four guitar notes, but the first longest-ever note (lasting over two minutes) is the superb starting point, courtesy of Wright. Indeed this first long sustained chord slowly emerging from the naught, where there is no harmony, no rhythm and no obvious melody, even if joined later on by feeble chimes and faraway strings, playing a sort of unnoticeable counter-melody, thus creating warmth where only cold should reign, but it fails to play the note that is now being urged by the piece of music. The second movement sees more action, with Rick recalling some previous chords or slowly introducing new motifs and although there is still no rhythm (Nick was probably calling a cab for Syd to go home ;o)))), harmonically the piece is now orgasmic; even if the feel of absence is growing as tensions increase with no relief in sight, although you sense it must come.

And it does come with the third movement, but not the one you expect and from where you expected it: Gilmour's four notes weigh in heavily at the start of the third movement, but the emptiness remains, masterfully maintained by Rick Wright's left hand remaining stuck on that lengthy chord. By the fourth guitar ostinato, Waters and Mason are now in the studio (they've just finished waving goodbye to Syd) and the tracks is now in full swing (enhanced by the previous interminable silence), but still no relief in sight. The superb two verses (no chorus) of the fourth movement come in just in time to enhance the track's grandioseness, and it's now so obvious that the song is aimed at Syd that the melodrama brings shivers in your spine. With the climax now past us, the track closes on a superb downward spiral, highlighted by Parry's sax and segueing with no interruption into the Welcoming Machine. Mechanical noises (like a sas opening) are leading a slow repetitive guitar strum on a slow heavy drum-less rhythm (Nick was checking up on his new Jaguar) alternating 3/4 and 4/4 behind Wright's Moog. Water's sad and melancholic lyrics in Crazy Diamond are now changing to a caustic and acid observation of the RnR dream, and the track ends in industrial noises.

The flipside is no less acidic with friend Roy Harper taking the role of the music industry tycoon over an RnB-type of song where Waters' bass leads the way. The tone changes abruptly (almost un-Floyd-like) through a radio know twisting session and out comes the title track where Gilmour illustrate Water's awesome letter to Syd, while Wright's piano underlines it subtly, while Nick was phoning Syd to see if he got home fine. Waters again ponders if what happened to Syd would not happen to the rest of the band. As the track melts into not-so-gentle wind sounds, we are blown back to the Crazy Diamond second part of the epic, not as transcendental as the first bloc, but often quoting some of its better moments, including another poignant verse well placed in the centre of the piece and a short visit to Emily (Bye bye, Syd).

This is the first major Floyd studio release that did not come in a gatefold, but the Hypgnosis artwork is no less superb with plenty to ponder including the four elements of life (fire > the white frame burning, air > the bent frame of the red scarf in forest, water > the leak on the lyrics side of the inner sleeve and Earth > the crack in the frame through which sand seeps out in the back of the album), but the outside sleeve is clearly meant to highlight the music industry highlight. The album came in a black plastic bag with a sticker representing a stylised handshake as a spacecraft over those four elements and a fascinating diving postcard.

Although not as initially successful as its predecessor, WYWH certainly ended up equalling it in the heart of fans, progheads generally preferring it to Dark Side. Among the three Floyd creators, this is where they worked best together and shared the workload evenly, (Nick serving tea to the visitors ;o))) and where Floydis at the top of their game.

As for that Immersion boxset of 2011 The WYWH immersion series boxset is a rather disappointing one, especially for the steep price asked? Indeed, outside a way too huge/wide box taking double the shelf space it needs, the two big books are relatively average in interest. From the five discs, only three maximum are of interest, sionce the other two are using up the same material in different format (CD; DVD-A and Blue-Ray), which augments the price uselessly. First of all, I don't hear much difference between the original mix and this remaster or the previous one, and whatever difference there is doesn't justify the steep investment in this boxset, unless you're really in the 4.0 or 5.1 remasters. Actually the more interesting disc is the bonus material, including the live stuff: the full Crazy Diamond (minus the Dick Parry saxophone section, plus the early versions of Dogs and Sheeps. From the alternate takes, the Roy Harper-less Cigar also features a much longer Gilmour solo at the end, and the Stephane Grapelli version of the title track are very enjoyable. Pity the band had to botch up the ultimate version of this second disc by discovering a few months after the boxset's release an alternate take of the second movement of Crazy Diamond, where Wright plays the grand piano. This Immersion "thingie" is a rare case where we might j-have wished for real work-in-progress version of the album tracks. As for the video content, one can only wonder why they didn't include all of the track's screen concert animations, provided they exist or that they are in exploitable shape. As for the Thorgeson animation bit, he's thankfully much better at making still pictures than computer animations. Soooo, while I wouldn't really call this expensive box a rip-off, only the second disc (with the usually expandable bonus tracks) is of any interest, thus making the "thing" very dispensible and totally unessential.

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Send comments to Sean Trane (BETA) | Report this review (#8745)
Posted Tuesday, February 03, 2004 | Review Permalink
loserboy
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars My high school days were full of PINK FLOYD and "Wish You Were Here" played a big role and still remains one of my all time most beloved albums. What a great introduction! And what a great ending! "Wish You Were Here" is really an epic album which blends all the right elements mixing blues and psychedelia with that classic PINK FLOYD space atmosphere. Without a question the opening to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" has to be one of the most memorable openings of all time. This album also features Roy Harper on vocals on "Have A Cigar" which is also one of my all time favorite PINK FLOYD numbers. This is essential music and is a definite statement and one of the all time classics.

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Send comments to loserboy (BETA) | Report this review (#8789)
Posted Monday, March 15, 2004 | Review Permalink
lor68
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars They start getting some poppy elements emerge here: otherwise this trend had already been put in evidence by some critics (but it was also their fortune) inside their previous and commercial album such as "Dark Side of the Moon"... a memorable example of the skillful sound engineering by ALAN PARSONS, anyway!! But coming to the present issue, this is probably their most successful and famous album, along with the top sold out and already mentioned above "The Dark Side of the Moon". The mini-suite "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond" alone (this latter track being the most important reference for a lot of "New-Progressive" bands like PENDRAGON) is well worth checking out, but also the rest, except on a few easier songs, is quite memorable.

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Send comments to lor68 (BETA) | Report this review (#8753)
Posted Saturday, April 03, 2004 | Review Permalink
greenback
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars "Wish you were here" is probably the most progressive of the Pink Floyd albums. Compared to the previous "Dark side of the moon", a tremendous change occurred: the keyboards are very floating, atmospheric and more modern here, although there are still organ textures. The guitar sounds are much more elaborated, sometimes having beautiful & fresh echo, like on "Shine on your crazy diamond part 1". The guitar solos sound is generally better crafted, more numerous, even sometimes sounding a bit bluesy. Dick Parry's sax is at its best: just enjoy his endless solo on "Shine on your crazy diamond part 1", terminating with a subtle fading echo effect: DELIGHTFUL! The overall rhythm is VERY slow, thus allowing the listener to fully enjoy each note played. Roger Waters is partly the lead singer. There are less special sounds here: mostly on "Welcome to the machine", AMAZINGLY sounding like the Tangerine Dream's "Force Majeure" album: at the end, you embark in a transporter and you are deported into a crowdy animated room!

On the other side, there are unfortunately 2 less good tracks: "Have a cigar" and "Wish you were here": "Have a cigar", not bad at all, is more rhythmic, less atmospheric, and it more sounds like the rhythmic mood on the "Animals" album. The very popular "Wish you were here" track, full of acoustic guitars, not progressive at all, makes a real contrast here with the other tracks: it is so popular that many people use to play it with an acoustic guitar during summer nights, in front of a fireplace. The last track, "Shine on your crazy diamond part 2", is something like a pleasant variation of the part 1. There are very serious, slow, loud, melodic and floating keyboards, punchy clavinet parts and strident guitar solos: the keyboards of the last part remind me the Tangerine Dream's Tangram album. Minus 0.5 star for the 2 more ordinary tracks mentioned above.

Rating: 4.5 stars

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Send comments to greenback (BETA) | Report this review (#8805)
Posted Wednesday, April 14, 2004 | Review Permalink
Easy Livin
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator / Retired Admin
5 stars "It could be made into a monster if we all pull together as a team"

Pink Floyd were smart with this album. Given the overwhelming success of its predecessor, they could easily have tried to create "Dark side of the moon, 2". Instead they chose to move on, while simultaneously reverting to a more progressive approach.

"Shine on you crazy diamond" dominates the album, lasting over 26 minutes in total. The track is nominally made up of 9 sections, but in reality there are 2, which bookend the other three tracks. The lyrics of "Shine on.." are a tribute to former band member Syd Barrett, who, according to the band, coincidently wandered into the studio during the recording sessions. The track is far less lyrical than much of "Dark Side of the moon" being much closer to previous works such as "Echoes". There's more in the way of instrumental passages here, Gilmour's guitar work being afforded the space to flow freely. There's also some lovely sax on the second half.

"Welcome to the machine" has loads of electronic sounds and effects, and is vaguely reminiscent of ELP's "Karn Evil 9, part 3" The track has a heavy, hypnotic beat, behind aggressive vocals, making for a superb contrast to the opening "Shine on you Crazy Diamond".

"Have a Cigar" features the legendary Roy ("When an old cricketer leaves the crease") Harper on vocals. It's a lighter, mildly amusing track which offers a cynical take on the record industry Once again the song contrasts well with the previous, heavier piece. The lyric "The band is just fantastic, that is really what I think, by the way, which one's "Pink"?" is a superb parody of a record company executive's ignorance.

The mood softens further for the acoustic title track, which would have fitted in well on "Meddle" or "Atom Heart Mother". This is Oasis' "Wonderwall", recorded decades before the Oasis track was. The song merges nicely into the second half of "Shine on you Crazy Diamond". While this is a recognisable reprise of the opening track, it differs markedly, breaking loose midway through, with Gilmour's guitar fronting a rising of the pace prior to the wind down ending.

While "Wish you were here" does indeed recall Pink Floyd's progressive roots, it's much tighter and less experimental than their Psychedelic era works. "Dark Side of the Moon" is rightly recognised as one of the best albums ever made by anyone, but I find this album to be even more enjoyable.

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Send comments to Easy Livin (BETA) | Report this review (#8738)
Posted Thursday, April 15, 2004 | Review Permalink
duxenaz@hotma
5 stars Almost as good as Dark Side of the Moon, however it is not as consistent. But other than that and the Division Bell, it is the greatest Pink Floyd Album, one of the world's best. The album only has five songs, but these songs are truly terrific. Also, Wish You Were Here is Pink Floyd's best ever song.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8739)
Posted Monday, April 19, 2004 | Review Permalink
daveconn
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars Wish You Were Here was dedicated to SYD BARRETT, PINK's leader in absentia. Arguably, so was "The Dark Side of the Moon". Not surprisingly, both albums build aural dreamscapes that present themes of alienation, paranoia, controlling forces and eventual escape. The notable difference is the loss of engineer Alan Parsons; without him, the gauzy sound becomes a bit more crystallized, while the "voices in your head" subside. The album is wrapped within parts 1 through 9 of "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", a direct address to SYD's mental state at the time that features musical commentary from Gilmour's blues-based guitar, Wright's swirling keyboards and guest DICK PARRY's saxophone. The songs in between are some of the band's best: "Welcome to the Machine" and "Have a Cigar" (sung by guest eccentric ROY HARPER) reveal that rock stars are processed product, and "Wish You Were Here" is the poignant sigh that comes with this realization. Again, Waters is able to communicate a full story (of sorts) in a single album, remarkably without loading the songs down with narrative.

While it's not the landmark effort of "Dark Side" (and what followup could be?), "Wish You Were Here" is classic PINK FLOYD from beginning to end.

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Send comments to daveconn (BETA) | Report this review (#8793)
Posted Monday, May 03, 2004 | Review Permalink
chessman
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars A decent, but non-essential offering from the Floydian boys. Dark Side Of The Moon is, of course, their best, even if it is hyped up too much. But this was, in comparison, disappointing. Nowhere near as smooth as Dark Side. Quite rough, and surprisingly tuneless in parts. Almost sounds out of tune here and there, in fact. And yes, I was there at the time, as people like to say. My mate bought this when it came out, and I gave it a listen. Glad I did, as it saved me buying it myself. Although, a few years ago, another friend got me the cd for Xmas. Don't get me wrong, it is certainly worth a listen, but it was at this point that Floyd starting getting 'ideas' about themselves and began taking years between albums. Also, the album is too short, even for seventies standards. However, I would still say have a listen and make up your own minds. Not Bad!

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Send comments to chessman (BETA) | Report this review (#8720)
Posted Saturday, May 29, 2004 | Review Permalink
James Lee
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars The only PINK FLOYD concert I ever attended was during their tour to support "Momentary Lapse" (Before then, I was too young; afterwards, I didn't really see any point). I and my bandmates, and respective girlfriends, got a late start because we were slow packing up our instruments from a typically sloppy performance that afternoon at a 'battle of the bands' across town. When we finally got to the show (Carrier Dome, Syracuse NY, 1987), we were afraid we'd missed the opening and were feeling very rushed and worn out. Suddenly, as we were picking our way through the crowds in the halls, the first sweeping synth notes of "Shine on you Crazy Diamond" faded in. There was a silence from the crowd, and then a frenzy to get to the seats. Anyway, whenever I hear the opening to the album, I get nostalgic for those times. I think it is the single most perfect beginning to any album (one that I want to really LISTEN to, not just put on while I'm doing something else) and it draws me in every time. The album itself is an astonishing evolution from "Dark Side", even more so than that album was from it's predecessors. The clarity of the production allows you to hear everything that is happening; from beginning to end, never blending into a 'wash of sound' the way previous releases had (sometimes in a good way, sometimes not). There are fewer musical ideas here, the band instead concentrating on improvising around a few central ideas- a tactic that worked here much better than on "The Wall", but like every band under the sun, single albums always seem to turn out better than doubles. The overall sound here is more synthetic, with the good old VCS3 getting a workout- and not just for weird sounds this time. Gilmour's guitar sounds less spacey and more bluesy on this album, providing an organic counterpoint that keeps everything from seeming too synthetic (except, appropriately, on "Welcome to the Machine"). The vocal harmonies are tighter, and a bit more impassioned; Roy Harper sounds right at home in the band on "Have a Cigar" (in fact, I always assumed it was Gilmour the first few times I heard it, before reading the credits). Was it planned out or just ironic in hindsight that in a work about Barrett's self-imposed exile from reality they employed the vocals of another musical 'crazy'? The title track has been played countless times (on the radio, but also by legions of guitar players, including me) and yet is so perfect a song that I never get tired of it (again, unlike "The Wall"). Then they dive back into the main theme, getting a little funkier with it, eventually transforming into a slow, sad, spacey jam, and then the album concludes as it began: a sweeping synth sound, but this time in a major key to dispel some of the dark mood. I hate to say it's not my favorite PF album- there's way too much competition- but it is a flawlessly realized and completely satisfying experience from start to finish.

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Send comments to James Lee (BETA) | Report this review (#8721)
Posted Thursday, June 03, 2004 | Review Permalink
Chris S
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars Perhaps the ultimate prog album of all time..How many albums can follow the calibre of it's predecessor as in this case DSOTM and still come up trumps. Shine on you crazy Diamond( All parts) definitely their finest creative suite and WYWH the title track equally as brilliant. It is hard to say more about this work of art except I do not think that even appreciators of Mozart, Bach and future generations will in many years from now ever cease to wonder about the strength and magnitude of this masterpiece. And we were lucky enough to know it in the flesh( no pun intended). Rick Wright had a lot of creative licence on this album and the rich depth of atmospheres, time, yearnings send waves of emotion from start to finish. Pink Floyd's finest 45 minutes- No contest.

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Send comments to Chris S (BETA) | Report this review (#8723)
Posted Monday, June 28, 2004 | Review Permalink
rangerm13@yah
5 stars THERE CAN BE ONLY ONE! Indeed, just like the Highlander, this album kills all other albums and takes their powers! OK, back to reality... As far as I'm concerned this is not only Pink Floyd's best album, but it is the best rock album of all time. Five stars do not do it justice! I recognize the genious of 'Dark Side Of The Moon' and 'The Wall,' but these records don't speak to me on the same level as 'Wish You Were Here.' Who would have guessed that a chance encounter with Syd Barrett would cause Pink Floyd to construct their most beautiful and deep piece of work. In many ways, Barrett never really left the group since his decent into madness served as a heavy influence on Roger Waters' song writing. This album represents the band finally finding an outlet for dealing with Barrett's specter. Whether it was intentional or not, Waters' lyrics end up taking on a much more universal context. Anyone who has ever felt lost in life or weighed down by the expectations of family and society as a whole will likely identify with the overall sense of helplessness in this album's music. Waters and Gilmour sing about a person whose every move and action is scrutinized beyond reason by an uncarring superior who can only see dollar signs rather than humanity. Burried under the mountain of expectations is a tired and weak individual who is trying desperately to regain control of his life but finds cage bars all around. Musically, this is Pink Floyd returning to their longer-form song writing ("Shine On You Crazy Diamond" was originally a 25 minute epic reminiscent of "Echoes" and "Adam Heart Mother Suite"). However, unlike 'Adam Heart Mother' and 'Meddle' the non-epic tracks are also worthwhile. Gilmour's solo on "Have A Cigar" remains one of my all-time favorites, and you have to love that classic line "Oh by the way, which one's Pink?" While Gilmour's guitar playing is impressive, much of this album belongs to Rick Wright and his multi-textured, ambient keyboard work. Wright is at his best during the majestic intro to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 1)" and the stark, eerie portions of "Welcome To The Machine." To sum up, this album has everything going for it: great music, inspired lyrics, and an amazing backround story. I have yet to hear anything better.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8724)
Posted Tuesday, June 29, 2004 | Review Permalink
frenchie
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Pink Floyd finally got around to giving Syd Barrett his farewell tribute even if it was 7 years after he left. Wish You Were Here is probably better than Dark Side of the Moon in my opinion but for those who love DSOTM then it is the best album after that one. This album probably relates to Meddle, Animals and DSOTM well because it has the same amount of musical skill and wonderous solos, basslines, progressions, the works.

Shine on you crazy Diamond is an Epic piece that could have been a side long piece but instead was split in half (part one being the intro and part two being the outro). This was revisited in the follow up, Animals with Pigs on the Wing. This pays off and is an interesting thing to do and allows more space of the vinyls, i pressume. Shine on You crazy Diamond is a prog rock anthem and really shows off the almost impossible task of bettering Dark Side of the Moon. The synth, piano and mellow guitar intro is classic and plays for just the right time so that it doesn't get boring and at the same time provides the ultimate build up to a guitar solo if there ever was one. The solo arrives, and it shakes the foundations of your speakers and your mind, and you sit back and let it flow through your veins and you think "oh my god! this is the best thing i've ever heard". I feel very lucky to be here to appreciate this and so should anyone else. If you're not a fan of prog rock then this will probably change your mind.

The soloage continues and progressess loudly and powerfully into some of gilmour's most powerful and emotional vocals ever which can bring a tear to your eyes. The lyrics, of course, relating to syd "you piper, you prisoner". These lyrics may be seen as a step down as they are not about dark stuff like in DSOTM, animals or the wall but the way they create the perfect tribute to Syd makes up for this, its nice to let the lads have a happier one for a change.

Wish You Were Here also see's a little less psychadelia as the band seem to have been growing out of it since atom heart mother, still these are stoner anthems and trippy but its nice to see the band evolving into more meaningful music and lyrics. The piano, bass, drums are all brilliant as you can expect and fit in well (even if they are a bit toned down from the likes of the 60's stuff). Dick Parry is back to deliver excellent sax pieces on both parts of the album.

And we have now reached "Welcome to the Machine". A really evil piece by the floyd but brilliant none-the-less. The fun and games are over here and the dull vocals, lyrics and droning guitars may get repetitive but it builds up tension and anguish that keeps the song going and is surprisingly one of the stand out tracks on the album. This may be incorparted into the mechanical handshake logo on the album cover. "Have a Cigar" is also a beastly effort and features Roy Harper on vocals. This song is an attack at media in music and how the band are against selling out. The lyrics achieve this perfectly and there is a dark irony in having Roy sing on this track. But hats off to him, he does the job well.

The title track is an odd one but is one of the most beautiful pieces gimour has ever written. It moves slowly yet progresses slyly and features only a few lines of tear embracing lyrics. Very moving and emotional. This song can also be related to syd. Ironicly the band were wishing syd was here at the same time as syd sneaked into to watch them record the album but the boys didnt even recognise him. This album ends where Shine on left of. A masterpiece and probably the most musically propelling piece the floyd have ever done. This has to be the best follow up to a masterpiece ever. and it doesn't stop there. I bet Syd was proud.

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Send comments to frenchie (BETA) | Report this review (#8725)
Posted Saturday, July 03, 2004 | Review Permalink
penguindf12
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars I think it's time I gave this album another chance. Last time I dismissed it because I was biased against it, and this time I want to clear it all up. This is as good or better than "Dark Side of the Moon", at least.

"Shine on You Crazy Diamond" starts with a quiet synth buildup, heralded by a strange "falling star" effect in the background. The keyboard drone builds up, and a synth horn effect enters and creates an ominous, foggy, mystic effect. Then a few upper strings on a guitar are plucked, and the synth readjusts, becoming a bass of sorts. Then Part One of this nine-part song ends with the synth slowly fading, then a single riff appears ambiently out of the silence. It is repeated, and soon the drums begin to rise until the music hits a point, and a world seems to open up as the band comes in. Part Two continues the slow rock feel of Part One, but the guitar is more prominent. Then the guitar fades, and the synth horn again takes over for Part Three. It creates a melancholy, ambient feel, and leads into Part Four, where the vocals begin.

The lyrics are essentially about Syd BARRETT, the former frontman of PINK FLOYD who went crazy from LSD use and holed himself up in his house in England. They can be applied to other things, however. When this part ends, Part Five begins and the saxophone joins. This part fades out into the monotonous drone of a machine, and a buzz heralds the arrival of "Welcome to the Machine."

This song is mainly acoustic, with the mechanical drone of keyboards accompanying. The lyrics greet a newcomer to the music world (or adult life itself, they can be taken either way). The song is great, and a keyboard solo enters around the middle for a haunting mechanical feel. Then the tape clicks, and is sped up and fades out. Just when you think it's over, the sound of a crowd of people begins and heralds the end of the first side (as it would have been on an LP).

The excellent song "Have a Cigar" is next. It features a repeated, catchy riff, while staying strangely progressive. This song is again about the music world, and the lyricss are the record label guy talking to a newcomer artist. He is full of fluff, only concerned with milking the money from the poor musician. Then this song is sucked into oblivion, with only a faint, crackling rumble in its place. Then it seems as though a record is replaced, and the silent beginning of the title track, er, begins. It has a longing feel, and seems to be played through a radio at first. But it is soon joined by a closer-to-us lead guitar. They soon join and mourn over the separation between people.

This entire album is about absenses in life. The first (and last) song in this album is about the absense of Syd, the second song is about the absense of free will, the third is about the absense of conscience or soul, and the title track is about absense of relationships, of feeling.

This song is swept away by wind, and then a progressing riff enters to push into Part Six of "Shine On". A synth horn enters as well. It steadily builds, then is joined by the lyrics for Part Seven. Part Eight then enters in a funky sort of way and then Part Nine fades the whole thing out much like Part One did, but in reverse.

Overall, this album seems to appeal more to those who didn't like "The Wall" or "Dark Side." It is somewhat more commercial, more accessible. Somehow it does this and also stays prog without becoming pop prog (like RUSH's "Moving Pictures"). I recommend it to those who are fans of FLOYD, or those who didn't really like "Dark Side" that much.

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Send comments to penguindf12 (BETA) | Report this review (#8727)
Posted Wednesday, August 11, 2004 | Review Permalink
Gatot
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars It's irrelevant to review this album with an aim to give recommendation whether to buy or not to buy this album as this one is really classic and definitely PROG! Shame on you if you browse around this page but you have not got this masterpiece album in your collection. Unless ... you are really really new prog lover, I understand. In this case, don't read this review, just BUY the CD! You will hardly regret this seminal work of PF.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond - pt. 1" starts with an ambient music in a very slow tempo, demonstrating soft guitar solo 'ala Gilmour. This kind of music is perfect to enjoy while sipping a cup coffee. Really cool intro. The more you spin the CD, your intensity for loving this track will grow tremendously. That's wat I experienced: the first time I listened to this track when the album was released, I could not bear to wait the music really "in" as the intro is too long. Having experienced a nice and long intro, the music flows smoothly by the token of simple guitar fills by Gilmour. What a great shot when all instruments enter to perform a great track; followed by clear vocal line "Rember when you're young....".

I remember that the first time I bought the album dated back 1975, I returned it to the record shop. You know why? It's because of the sound produced at the end of "Shine ...part 1" which look like a recording problem due to wrinkled analog tape. Poor me. In fact, the part is an excellent opening for 2nd track "Welcome to the Machine" which is heavy with keyboard sound production and efects. There are acoustic guitar work though. But it's not exploited as solo guitar. Keyboard is really the king in this track. Acoustic guitar is only used to accentuate the song.

"Have A Cigar" is another great track. It has medium beat and stunning melody and encouraging lyrics such as "the band is just fantastic ..". The other important point of this track is some smart creation by the band on touchy and memorable lyrics as "ANd did we tell you the name of the game, Boy?" ... uuughhhh what a great pitch man! Gilmour guitar work at the interlude is really fascinating, combined with keyboard sound. Again the music stop suddenly with an unpredictable sound that looks like a wrinkled analog tape. In fact, due to this part finally I returned the album to the local store because I thought it was a factory defect.

The title track has a fabulous mixing for acoustic and electric guitar. "So ..so you think you can tell / heaven from hell?" This piece of lyrics has become so popular to my local prog community where we keep telling each other on what album that we're listening to at particular time, thru mobile phone.

I don't think I need to explore the last track "Shine On .. part 2" which is at the same quality as opening track. One think I need to mention is the sound of wind at desert reminds me the cover of CAMEL "Rajaz". Overall, I appreciate this album very highly as it has a very strong composition, excellent melody and great musicianship. Last but VERY IMPORTANT is the band creation of sound effects - it's AMAZING! Luckily .. we have the new generation of sound engineering. Who is he? Steven Wilson of PORCUPINE TREE! He's a great producer. - Rating 5/5. Gatot Widayanto, Indonesia.

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Send comments to Gatot (BETA) | Report this review (#8729)
Posted Wednesday, August 25, 2004 | Review Permalink
The Prognaut
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Separately from several of the past works and evidently overshadowed by the impact caused by "Dark Side of the Moon", this 1975 production is clearly the most unidirectional PINK FLOYD album since it follows a straight perfectly drawn line from beginning to end. And by "unidirectional" I don't speak of monotonousness and plainness, au contraire, it is that certain air of unattractiveness that makes it even more appealing to the common listener. While looking through this never-ending list of reviews and critics set upon this magnificent album, all what's to be done is to pop the CD in the stereo and let the magic begin. "Wish You Were Here" isn't only one of the most representative latter half of the seventies memorabilia, it is indeed the kind of recording that separates lasciviousness from idleness; it tells apart musical contemporaneity from old-fashioned formulas reinvented over and over again; and most importantly, it drives the way to endless comfort and enjoyment.

The first thing that caught my attention right away, besides David GILMOUR's refined guitar execution; were the lyrics written for this album. Astonishing and breathtaking. Unpretentious, clean, emotive, meaningful. what can I say, for the first time I felt that passionate approach to the band, inexplicable even on the "Dark Side of the Moon" and "Meddle" levels. Secondly, the delicate, mind-blowing touch by Dick PARRY. That special issue certainly deserves a separate review, but since my contribution here is limited to "a review a piece", I'll leave that out for another occasion. Thus, all those components I just underlined for you, combined with Roger WATERS' lyricism, give a very evocative result. There's no possible way to narrow this album down to a precise description, as you have read me trying and struggling to do so; so that's up to you to describe. You name it, "Wish Your Were Here" has got it.

Obviously to me, as you have noticed; the album emanates such mysticism and power unrevealed by the band at this point, turning this experience so new, so unique, that claims for unspoken recognition. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is definitely a subdivision to what's been considered "conceptual" so far those times within prog world and established considerable parameters of comparison. The nine episode suite resembles that epical PINK FLOYD touch already represented in previous recordings, demonstrating the band wasn't bottled up in one single progressive formula. Unarguably, it is the most signifying track out of the entire record, is it indeed the proof of the altitudes from where PINK FLOYD was able to dive and then fly back across the sky in a matter of heartbeats. As described up above, guitar displaying by David GILMOUR is provocatively remarkable and unrepeatable. Keyboards intromissions by Rick WRIGHT are inscriptively precise, very well crafted and organized, a necessary piece to understand the mere intention of the album in its entireness. For complimentary effects, I'll just refer to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" as enticingly perfect.

The songs in between, are indispensable as well to completely enjoy the experience. "Welcome to the Machine" evokes the irrational, psychedelic dash of experimentation performed throughout "Dark Side of the Moon", with the erratic noises and the delightfully sardonic lyrics. When moving on to "Have a Cigar", the mood perceived in the air turns kinda funky and dysfunctional (figuratively speaking), where WATERS plainly sings (along Roy HARPER) the story about the band's first experience with a record company manager ever. The lyrics here are indisputably rhetorical, showing us there's more to this world full of crap and luxury, where constant self-searching bring us back to where we started from. Revealingly amusing, this lyrical composition lets us see through another deeper side of PINK FLOYD.

"Wish You Were Here". The self-titled song is definitely one of the most recognizable not only for the fans, but for the audiences worldwide. I understand it is also one of the easiest songs to play on guitar, but since I'm not a guitarist, I'll just have to believe the word on street and be faithful to those bohemian gatherings were the song is always played for my unstoppable enjoyment. A beautiful song indeed, where inner feelings constantly dwell to find a way out of misery, sorrow and obscurity, just to reach out for the understanding and the emotiveness. David GILMOUR leading the vocals is simply great, showing off his well educated skills that happen to be undeniably outstanding. More than bringing you to tears, this piece will take you to unrevealing heights where you can only let go of everything and die for a fugacious moment that will bring you back to life itself. A geniality made music.

So, what are you all doing here still reading? Go dust this album off, slide it out its case and pop it in the stereo. If you're one of the few that sadly haven't gotten it yet, what are you waiting for? Go, fly, run or whatever you gotta do to have it. Until the day I cease to exist, I will love this album. Indisputably, the whole five stars.

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Send comments to The Prognaut (BETA) | Report this review (#8730)
Posted Friday, August 27, 2004 | Review Permalink
shari_jane@ho
5 stars I appreciate Pink Floyd for finding fine music and using in their masterpieces. The 12 string guitar piece at the beginning of Wish You Were Here belonged to my father, Floyd E. Hufford, from Senath, Missouri, who passed away in April 1974 at an early age of 27. He would have been proud to know that his music lives on for all to enjoy. I have strong feelings each time I hear the song, Wish You Were Here, because I have the same music piece on a cassette, with the same scratchy old sounds that my father recorded on a very small tape recorder.

I grew up listening to Pink Floyd and was always amazed with their special creativity in music. I am proud of my father and realize that if he would've lived through the cancer, he would have been something big.

Thank you again Pink Floyd. My heart goes out to you.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8731)
Posted Thursday, September 02, 2004 | Review Permalink
5 stars What is there to say? This album is a must. It is also one of the few albums which I really wish was longer. I truly love this album. There is always a bit of disappointment when this album ends. And for me, that is the ultimate compliment.

The open track, SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND, PART ONE, is perfect. Wright's synths, Gilmour's guitar are wonderful on this piece. Waters lyrics are also great on this album. Who else would bite the hand that feeds them but Water's in HAVE A CIGAR?

The packaging was also great. The original album was a wrapped in an opaque dark blue plastic wrap with a cool sticker on in. When you ripped off the wrapper off, you were confronted by the classic picture and cover by Hipgnosis. This album had everything you could want from an album.

Dark Side of the Moon was a hard album to follow up, but IMHO, Wish You Were Here surpassed it predecessor.

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Send comments to pstankovich (BETA) | Report this review (#8733)
Posted Wednesday, September 08, 2004 | Review Permalink
Guillermo
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars In 1975 Pink Floyd was still a band made by contributions by all musicians to the final product. This is a good album, with Roger Waters maybe still thinking that the band was a band and not that he was the band, as on later albums. The lyrics are interesting, but musically the album is not as interesting to me as "The Dark Side of the Moon". Roy Harper sang "Have a Cigar" because Roger Waters thought that his voice wasn`t very good, so they invited Harper to sing. The best songs are "Shine on you crazy diamond" and "Wish you were here". Roger Waters is a very intelligent lyricist. This was their last album on which Rick Wright contributed to the songwriting until "The Division Bell".

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Send comments to Guillermo (BETA) | Report this review (#8736)
Posted Sunday, September 12, 2004 | Review Permalink
5 stars Surely not inferior to "Dark side of the moon" - sometimes "Wish you were here" is superior, more "progressive" like Meddle's "Echoes" i.e. Shine on you crazy diamond!. This is the last piece of an incredible trilogy, musicaly not very far of Dark side . But the spirit have changed - Roger Water is more and more dominant.His lyrics - VERY well written ! - are, sometimes, far away of Pink floyd's psychedelics origins. This is a rupture annoucing the powerful "animals". the tone is more agressive except Shine on you crazy diamond" and "Wish you were here", late but VERY astonishing homage to Syd Barrett...a friendly ghost of past years hauting this album like he wanted to say good-bye...for the last time? I strongly recommend this album but maybe we should listen to this record after Meddle and Dark side...(respect the trilogy!)

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Send comments to Canicheslayer (BETA) | Report this review (#8737)
Posted Saturday, October 30, 2004 | Review Permalink
5 stars Of all Floyds classic 70's albums this for me is the most fluent and accessible to the masses. It flows as one piece of music and you are compelled to stay with it, appreciated more of course on CD. The album does not have any mediochrety although Welcome to the machines may be more difficult to absorb on the first few listens than the rest of the LP. Production is tight and heavy and more acoustic than Dark Side whose sound was sculptured by Alan Parsons. Fans of Gilmours playing will appreciate him the most on this Album. It would be more representative of the quality of this LP if it was a little higher up on the top 20 list on this web site and not umpteen places below Foxtrot and Nursery Chryme both of which of course deserve to be up there with the best. A subliminal piece of progressive rock from start to finish.

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Send comments to maciek (BETA) | Report this review (#8747)
Posted Monday, November 22, 2004 | Review Permalink
leoal_co@hotm
5 stars By far, this is Pink Floyd's masterpiece. Here it's the perfect balance between lyrics and music.

I still listen to "Shine on Your Crazy Diamond" like it was the first time, and I'm still surprised by its power. Every second you get something new and magnificent! And what about "Welcome to the Machine" and "Have a Cigar"? excellent pace for continue loving the moment... and as for "Wish You Were Here" I can only say that the lyrics are beautiful and that guitar makes me miss something or someone.

It's absolutely necessary to get this album right away!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8749)
Posted Wednesday, December 01, 2004 | Review Permalink
philou295@yah
5 stars Wooaw, such a masterpiece ! For the huge intro and guitars and the great vocal lines of "Shine on you crazy diamond" ( one of my all-time favorite Floyd tracks ). For the threatening strangeness and tension of "Welcome to the Machine". For the emotion and feeling of "Wish you were here". And for its overall wonderful lyrics, WYWH is a compulsory possession for any progressive music listener in the world. Nothing more to say.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8750)
Posted Saturday, December 11, 2004 | Review Permalink
5 stars Yes, ladies and gentlemen, a most deffinite masterpiece. The second best Pink Floyd album (second only to the heavily artful "The Wall"), "Wish You Were Here" is a follow-up of such calliber to "The Dark Side Of The Moon" that it completely surpasses it altogether! Some Floyd fans may not be as enthusiastic as I am, arguing it lacks the unity of TDSOTM, or it's just a moderately-sucessful filler between it and Pink Floyd]s later, more artsy work. LIES, I tell you, LIES! Gilmour's guitar is at its best, surprisingly varied and very catchy, with long and elaborate riffs, reaching an intensity found previously only on "Meddle". Moreover, Waters' vocals are veery good ( in comparison to his usual way of singing, which is extremely good, but wouldn't have fit on this album), and Wright's keyboards reach prog rock Nirvana on the two parts of the key track of this glorious masterpiece: "Shine On, You Crazy Diamond". Even if "Echoes" surpasses it with its grace and epic grandor, this suite is the sign of Pink Floyd's artistic maturity. The second best song on the album is undoubtedly "Wish You Were Here". Lyricaly, it is the best, but after a brilliant start, it loses intensity, in favour of a perpetual fake ending. "Welcome To The Mahine" is highly impressive, but becomes monotonous. I reccomend "Inerstellar Overdrive" for people who like this sort of songs; its orchestrartion and soundeffects are fairly better. "Have A Cigar" is somewhat misplaced in the tracklisting ( I think that it would have been better to put it before "Welcome To The Machine"), but that is its only flaw. All in all, adeserved rating for a perfect album. I highly reccomend it to people who are new to the world of Pink Floyd.

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Send comments to Captain Fudge (BETA) | Report this review (#8751)
Posted Friday, December 17, 2004 | Review Permalink
jaham1@yahoo.
5 stars This is the FIRST Rock 'n Roll record I ever owned. I was in 5th grade when my oldest sister gave me this "piece of crap" that she mistakenly bought because of the cover art. I "wish" everyone could have had this as their first introduction to modern music. No doubt, it was too heavy for my 10 or 11 year old brain - but there was something about the etherial sounds of Richard Wright's synthesizers on Shine On . . . and the soul-piercing notes of Gilmour's guitar, that had me hooked. It was only much later that I discovered the brilliance of Roger-dodger's libretto's. Two of the best lines in all of rock 'n roll are on this album; 1) "Oh, by the way, which one is Pink?" and 2) "We're so happy we can hardly count!" Those are right up there with the #1 lyric, "I saw a ware wolf drinking a pinacolada at Trader Vic's - his hair was perfect!" (R.I.P. Warren). I will always own this masterpiece of an album. And although there are at least another dozen or so records that have replaced this as my "all time favorite", I will consider it a life worth living if this is the LAST piece of music I ever hear (in its entirety), before join Zevon in the sky with crazy diamonds.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8752)
Posted Saturday, December 18, 2004 | Review Permalink
FloydWright
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars I recognize that part of what I have to say will be unpopular--but I would like to start off by saying that I do have a high respect for this album, even though there are two significant flaws that I can't just ignore. With that out of the way, I'd like to say that this album is a fantastic listen on headphones, especially for those who enjoy rich and varied keyboard work. RICK WRIGHT shines here, and if you enjoy his work, you're in for a treat. Minimoog, Rhodes, Clavinet, all the way to good old fashioned acoustic piano--it's all here.

First, I'd like to say that "Welcome to the Machine" is totally flawless. Although extremely unnerving (especially the final part, to any of you who live in areas where there is a tornado siren!), the machine-effects are a wonderful opening and closing to the song, as well as providing an eerie bassline throughout. The chord structures are quite innovative here, helping to set the oppressive mood, and is it possible to say enough about the synthesiser effects? The delay just makes it sound all the more impressive. One has to wonder if (given the beginning friction in the band) RICK WRIGHT perhaps should have had a credit on this song. Of course, ROGER WATERS does earn a credit honestly--the excellent lyrics reflect the ensnarement of the young victim (SYD BARRETT) in the world of stardom, a role for which he is completely unprepared.

This theme is continued well into "Have a Cigar", a much more traditional rock number that has, perhaps, even better lyrics. Given the continued disintegration of the music industry in the 21st century, this song seems just as current...the only difference would be that instead, the slimeball record executive (sung excellently by Roy Harper, the only non-Floydian ever to lead on a PF song with the exception of Clare Torry) would be creating a "star" out of a no-talent hack, rather than by abusing a talented band like the FLOYD. David Gilmour is really in his groove here, and when it comes to the missing credit on this song, I'd put my bets on him--it seems like he had a lot to contribute here.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is both the location of the most wonderful work on the entire album, and one of the most significant (to me) flaws. I should first say that everyone's playing is superb here, but most especially the guitar and keys. Every note is gorgeous. Parts 6-9 in particular are an absolute keyboards extravaganza. Almost every conceivable sort of keyboard gets in there, and even the bassline is almost totally taken over by a keyboard--that stacatto sound is a Clavinet. In fact, it's my suspicion that everything from 6:30 forward on the second half of SOYCD was almost entirely written by RICK WRIGHT. (If you're interested in more of his laid-back, jazzy approach, so underused by the FLOYD, I suggest trying to track down a copy of his first solo album, entitled Wet Dream. You won't regret it.)

The one trouble with SOYCD, in my opinion, is the vocals. Part of my bias may be due to the fact that I'm more used to the versions sung by DAVID GILMOUR (both the PULSE and David Gilmour in Concert versions). It just seems to me that ROGER WATERS is far too snide for a song that calls for a more wistful, melancholy touch--this is a remembrance of someone absent from their lives, not a bitter-at-the-world song like "Pigs", and WATERS does not seem to (at this particular point in his career) be able to adapt successfully to it. The other--and in my opinion much more serious--flaw on this album has to do with the studio version of "Wish You Were Here". I simply can't stand to listen to it most of the time. While the song premise is good--pleasant chords and melody, and effective lyrics, I think the problem is in the mixing. The song is simply too dry in the studio version...the vocals sound so tinny that you'd think the "radio" section never stopped, and the acoustic guitar also lacks a certain warmth. Furthermore, I think this is a song that desperately needs the intimacy that a live performance can offer. Yes, I do understand that this coldness may be due to the intended "theme of absence" in the album, but this version is still not my preference.

While it hurts to give an album with so many impressive parts this rating, I still have to do it in the interests of honesty. These aren't the kind of flaws I find myself able to "acquire a taste for", as I ended up doing for the SYMPHONY X masterpiece V: The New Mythology Suite in a matter of only a few months. Years have passed and my opinion has not moved an inch.

However, I must say to you--this IS a must in any respectable record collection along with The Dark Side of the Moon. Especially if you are at all an audiophile or keyboard enthusiast, don't pass this up!

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Send comments to FloydWright (BETA) | Report this review (#8757)
Posted Monday, January 10, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars After 'Dark Side' (and a little bit dissapointed with it) I thought that Pink Floyd had said it all. I bought 'Wish You Were Here' album immediately after it had been released and when I was putting record on my gramophone for a first listening ( I remember it very well although it happened exactly 30 years ago ) there was no usual excitement, I felt kind of calm. But after 44 minutes of listening to it, I played the record once again and from that moment on there was no more listening but enjoying in it. I won't go through each track and make my comments, I will only say - this is a masterpiece of progressive rock. Enjoy it !

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Send comments to bsurmano (BETA) | Report this review (#8758)
Posted Wednesday, January 12, 2005 | Review Permalink
theinfiltrate
5 stars Wish You Were Here is an amazing album. I wouldn't consider it their best (Animals is a bit better), since "Welcome To The Machine" is not that great, but the rest of the album is almost perfect: "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is brilliant in each of it's 9 parts, especially Gilmour's parts on the first half of it (which are perfectly placed and played if you ask me), "Wish You Were Here" is a nice "ballad", and "Have A Cigar" is also a good one. Wright plays really well on this album.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8761)
Posted Saturday, January 15, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars For me this is the real MASTERPIECE of Pink Floyd and not DSOTM. Sound here is even perfect that the previous. It has 5 songs but it was the same with the previous (Breathe and Reprises, Time, Money, Us and Them, Brain Damage). \\Shine on you crazy diamond (10/10) Perfect classic prog Rock music \\Welcome to the Machine (9/10) isolation and claustrofobia \\Have a Cigar (9/10) \\Wish You were Here (10/10) The Great Ballad of Pink Floyd \\Shine on you crazy diamond (10/10) again

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Send comments to tailsme (BETA) | Report this review (#8762)
Posted Friday, January 21, 2005 | Review Permalink
els-lund@onli
5 stars Masterpiece! Nearly as good as "Dark Side of The Moon"! This album have two of Pink Floyd's best songs: "Shine on your crazy diamond Part 1" and "Part 2". These songs are just fantastic and are the main reason to buy this album! "Welcome to the machine" is a great mechanical space-like piece. It's a excellent song (in my opinion). "Have a cigar" is a typically mid-70's rock song but not as good as the songs i just mentioned. The Title track, "Wish you were here", is in my opinion, a overrated song that i usually skip everytime i hear this album, but it's still a OK song, but nothing special! Overall this is a brilliant album from Pink Floyd and i recommend it to all serious prog-fans!!!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8767)
Posted Thursday, February 03, 2005 | Review Permalink
stormijo4@aol
5 stars Pink Floyd was my cousins all time favorite band and tomorrow morning at his funeral they are going to play this song. It fits him. He is only 22 years old but appreicates this genre of music. I will always have this song dear to my heart because it was dear to his and is being played to honor him. I am sure the band would be proud to know their music has and is still touching peoples lives in such dematic ways

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8769)
Posted Tuesday, February 08, 2005 | Review Permalink
palash-thakur
5 stars WISH YOU WERE HERE was the album Pink Floyd released AFTER DSOTM when everybody was ready to jump on their backs for releasing a inferior sequel.DSOTM was still selling like hot cakes .pink floyd was the band everyone was listening to.(that includes people who like to jump on the bandwagon).WYWH has a big one but divided into 2 parts and if you take them together it is bigger than echoes by 2 or 3 minutes.however that is not germane to the issue.what is is the fact that a band who made DSOTM released THIS album.in fact i feel that shine on you crazy diamond is the most underrated song in what..this universe! and this album is the most underrated album in history.SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND part 1 starts off slowly and builds up slowly to its climax.in fact the first words are spoken at the 8 min mark.so you can take this to be almost instrumental.i thought earlier that the words refer to england i mean look at it the other way instead of relating it with syd barret relate the words with england if you know history.it holds water both ways.welcome to.. is an almost ugly attack on the music industry and has a lot of sound effects of machines.i find this one very interesting & Depressing sometimes sadder than shine.. .have a cigar is a song that somehow doesn't go with the album ,the tune i mean .the words are a great follow up to wttmachine ,you find the ultra serious floyd making fun of themselves in the line "the band is just fantastic most sincerely/ oh by the way which one's pink".the title track begins rather unconventionally but pink floyd is a uncoventional band .the songwriting AND music of this album are great.and they only become better with animals but that comes later.shine on part 2 is faster and maybe.... maybe just better than part 1. if you haven't got it GO GET IT .GO!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8784)
Posted Tuesday, February 15, 2005 | Review Permalink
chrispapadaki
5 stars One of the best progressive rock albums ever!And i think that is floyd's best album along with meddle and dark side!All the songs are great,and it contains one of the best song of Pink Floyd,"Shine On You Crazy Diamond".I think it is equal in quality with the epic "Echoes"! If you haven't heard this album go IMMEDIATELY an buy it!!!!!!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8786)
Posted Friday, February 18, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars My first Pink Floyd cd, also my first progressive cd, and even my first cd (together with Nirvana's In Utero). My father had already let me hear some of his Pink Floyd LP's and he told about this album he has had in his youth, but which he lost on a party. I decided to buy it and I liked is very much. All songs are fantastic, except for "Wish you were here", that in my opinion isn't a bad song at all but very overrated and I don't know why exactly it overshadows the more unknown album tracks "Welcome to the Machine" (my favourite) and "Have A Cigar". "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" is more known, and it deserves it. It is a great song with a mysterious but peaceful atmosphere.

If I was Syd Barret and a album like this was dedicated to me, I'd be the proudest person on earth.

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Send comments to daghrastubfari (BETA) | Report this review (#8787)
Posted Friday, February 25, 2005 | Review Permalink
Cluster One
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Look up the word under 'Essential' in the Oxford English Dictionary. You will find a picture of the "Wish You Were Here" album cover.

Besides being the favourite album in the FLOYD catalogue of both Gilmour and Wright, it is PINK FLOYD at their apex. The possible adjectives to describe this seminal piece of music are endless: exquisite, nostalgic, cynical, satirical, heartfelt, futuristic, progressive and most importantly melancholic.

More often than not, when you ask a FLOYD fan what their most valued album is, "WYWH" will be their response.

Why are you even bothering to read a review on "Wish You Were Here"? If you don't already know, own and love this album, you are probably deaf; or dead.

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Send comments to Cluster One (BETA) | Report this review (#8804)
Posted Tuesday, March 01, 2005 | Review Permalink
vladimir.leks
4 stars Pink Floyd, in my opinion, musically cannot compare to Yes, Genesis , ELP or VDGG. However, they have invented something new. They combined the space majestic sounds of spheres with simple, nearly folk songs. And it is working excellently, especially in the great three albums AHM, DSOTM and WYWH. Perhaps the Animals a bit too. Nevertheless in later stuff not, although I used to like the Wall the most as a teenager, today I am aware that the Wall hardly compares with the above mentioned albums. The more introvert and deppressive PF is, the less I am able to listen to it. In other words, the greater influence and impact of RW on the final product, the smaller impact on me. Concerning later PF, I much more prefer two solo projects of DG, which though lacking the space sounds of spheres are rendering the musicality of simple folk songs, and that side is I think more important than the sound of the space. WYWH is my favorite of PF and Shine on.... the best track of them.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8806)
Posted Friday, March 04, 2005 | Review Permalink
el böthy
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars You know how there are good albums, there are masterpieces and then there are those very rare ones, the perfect ones? Well, this is one of them, a perfect album. PERFECT! You can´t get better than this, I just can't see how that would be possible. By far the most balanced one also, Waters and Gilmour never had so much chemistry (which is a very weird thing to say, as they were about to break up while recording this one). From the epic and atmospheric Shine on you crazy diamond, which has one of the best build ups ever, I loooooooooove that keys intro, so simple and yet so effective; to Waters first step into total negativity and madness that is Welcome to the machine, to the rockier and ironic Have a cigar, to the most beautiful song ever recorded by them Wish you were here. this is perfect from start to finish. Really a good idea to divide Shine on, a smart move. Waters as always shines as a lyricist and the rest of the band plays some of their best stuff. is there something I have not said yet? Ah yes; IT´S PERFECT!

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Send comments to el böthy (BETA) | Report this review (#8807)
Posted Sunday, March 06, 2005 | Review Permalink
4 stars Another classic from the Floyd. The album begins with Shine on part 1. A track that is dedicated to Syd Barret. The gentle keyboard work and guitars slowly draws the listener into the music. The band decided to split shine over both sides of the album rather than make it one long piece.

Welcome to the machine is up next. Some people say the band are 'biting the hand that feeds' with this track (and have a cigar).

Next we have ' Have a cigar'. Pink floyd have a guest singer on this track (Roy Harper) there is some cracking guitar work on this piece. In the song the band have written about the greed of record companies and their obssesion with making as much profit as possible "we're just knocked, we heard about the sell out, you gotta get an album out, you owe it the people, we're so happy we can hardly count". The track ends with a change from clear stereo into a crackling radio sound.

Wish you were here is next. The track that has caused much debate amoung fans (is it syd barett singing on the title track?), well the band have said he was in the studio at the time. Anyway, this is a wondeful song that contains one of my favourite lyrics of all time "We're just two lost souls, swimming in a fish bowl, year after year".

The album ends with the last part of Shine on... some people have said the outro is overlong but i really it.

All in all a very good album from the floyd.

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Send comments to Prog_head (BETA) | Report this review (#8808)
Posted Wednesday, March 09, 2005 | Review Permalink
Eetu Pellonpää
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars I guess this album has a theme of remembering now late Syd Barrett, or at least the lyrics of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond part one" and "Wish You Were Here" are in my opinion related with this theme. These are also the best songs on this album for me. "Welcome to The Machine" and "Have A Cigar" are also ok, but not musically very interesting I fear. The good elements of this album make it still very recommendable purchase. The songs are placed on the album in similar manner as on King Crimson's "Larks' Tongues in Aspic" record, as the big main composition is divided to two sections, and they surround the more casual songs by opening and closing the album. The best personal memory about this album for me relates to an event, when I escaped a stupid party via taxi, and the first track was being played from the nocturnal radio channel - I approved from the driver's request to boost the volume to the top.

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Send comments to Eetu Pellonpää (BETA) | Report this review (#8810)
Posted Friday, April 01, 2005 | Review Permalink
sangoseby@hot
5 stars It's Pink Floyd's greatest album. I'd like to say to evevry person who said that the Shine on you Crazy Diamond was a too long song that they don't deserve to listen at Gilmour's magic music. Repeat the same chorus 5 times in a 3 minutes song like a lot a groups do is not musically intelligent. Pink Foyd presents in this album the possibility to get out from the basic stuff (verse, a chorus and a guitar solo). When you listen to that album, you enter slowly in it with the intro of the first song, then you go up, down, left and right, and you come back where you were in the beginning in the end. Saying that it's Pink Floyd best album is not enough: this is a real masterpiece, not like all the masterpieces coted in this site, it's a real one. Think before to say that an album has no weaknesses.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8812)
Posted Sunday, April 17, 2005 | Review Permalink
Bj-1
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
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5 stars Should have gotten 5 stars for the "Shine On" tracks alone, a masterful release from Pink Floyd though DSOTM still beats it by an inch. However, some of Pink Floyd's finest moments are to be found here, notably on the "Shine on" tracks, as well as the chilling "Welcome to the Machine". Although the title track is a bit overplayed there's very little to dislike here and this one stands as on the the best PF albums and definitely one of the best prog-rock albums from the 70's.

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Send comments to Bj-1 (BETA) | Report this review (#8813)
Posted Tuesday, April 26, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars For me this is my ultimate Prog Album alongside GENESIS'S "Selling England by the Pound". This album opens up with a wonderful synthesizer solo top with another one giving a spacey effect, alongside a emotional bluesy guitar the entire parts are great yes you guessed it "Shine on you Crazy Diamond", Welcome to the Machine I would associate more with Electronica (This album has the most synthesizers than any other Floyd album as far as I'm aware), Have a Cigar a great Rock N Roll track to jam along too featuring Roy Harper on guest vocals, Wish You Were Here was the relaxer with a acoustic ballad Wish You Were Here. This is dediated to former founder member Roger Keith 'Syd' Barrett. Highly Recommended this is my Top album anyway!!!!!!!!

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Send comments to PROGMAN (BETA) | Report this review (#8814)
Posted Thursday, April 28, 2005 | Review Permalink
Yanns
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Yeah, this is pretty much the greatest album of all time. I often joke about it, because I also consider Dark Side of the Moon as the greatest album of all time. If people ask me what the greatest album ever is (and my opinion on ths changes constantly, like every other prog lover) I might say Dark Side of the Moon. If they ask me about Wish You Were Here, I say its better than DSOTM. Although it doesn't make sense on the surface, it does once you analyze it. History has treated DSOTM amazingly. History has made it the greatest album of all time. WYWH, in reality, is better than DSOTM, but Dark Side is still somewhat considered the greatest album of all time.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part One: Epic masterpiece. Trademark Floyd, slowly feeding you genius in the form of music. Could be the greatest song of all time, but it becomes rivaled by other songs on this very album later on.

Welcome to the Machine: Insanely good. Not just good. Insanely good. Can't describe it with words. "Welcome, my son.... welcome... to the machine"

Have a Cigar: Basically the only upbeat song on the album, if you can call it upbeat. It has one of my favorite riffs, and the intro is one of my favorites, don't ask me why. Again, words fail me.

Wish You Were Here: This song transcends music. Simple little song, but a masterpiece beyond all other music. I once saw someone call it overrated, I nearly flipped out. This song is basically as good a song as you can find, ever.

Shine On... Part Two: Continuation of masterpiece in Part One. Bass intro is incredible. Also, the "funeral march" at the end is perfect. Not usually the type of thing I'll like, but somehow Floyd pulls it off perfectly, like they always do.

My words and praise cannot convey one-one hundredth of what this album is really like. For those who don't know, it is dedicated to Syd Barrett, the original founder of the band who went insane from drugs in 1968 and left the band. He "flamed out", just like the cover portrays (which is one of my favorite covers also.) Basically, it is necessary to your existence to own this album. That's basically the bottom line. If you don't, then something is terribly wrong. That's how important this album truly is. If you don't own it, do 2 things. 1) Wonder why you wasted your time reading this review when you could have been buying this album, and 2) Go buy this album. 5/5.

Ram on.

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Send comments to Yanns (BETA) | Report this review (#8815)
Posted Thursday, April 28, 2005 | Review Permalink
richardh
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars I've only just purchased this album but I can't really argue with the comments that have been made by many.Great album.For me this was the last Pink Floyd album where all members made a significant and important contribution.Rick Wrights keyboard playing is exceptional while Mason lays down solid patterns on the drums.Dave Gilmour for his part is a superb player with plenty of control and soul in his playing and of course Waters lyrics and singing adds a dose of grittiness to the proceedings that stops the whole thing from being bland.The songs are all brilliant.Shine On You Crazy Diamond acts like 'book ends' for the album which in itself is a vey neat idea.One of those great strap on the headphones albums if ever there was.Solid 5 stars.

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Send comments to richardh (BETA) | Report this review (#8816)
Posted Friday, April 29, 2005 | Review Permalink
Cygnus X-2
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars Easily my favorite Pink Floyd album. Every track on this album is solid gold, and there is no filler. There is phenomenal playing by every member on this album, especially David Gilmour and Richard Wright. The lyrics are also top notch, the album being a complaint against the record industry, as well as an ode to their lost member, the "Crazy Diamond' Syd Barrett.

The album opens quietly with synths for a minute or 2, the opener being Shine on You Crazy Diamond Part 1. Then David Gilmour and his immaculate guitar tone come in. Giving one of the most well-known guitar solos, as well as a hell of an effort, then suddenly a haunting riff comes into your headphones. The song quickly picks up, and Gilmour continues his incredibly tasteful and beautiful guitar solo. When the vocals come in, you are suddenly swept away into the lush landscapes of Pink Floyd. After 13 minutes, a beautiful guitar solo, and a beautiful saxophone solo from Dick Perry, Shine on You Crazy Diamond comes to an end. The next track, Welcome to the Machine, is a darker tune, with great acoustic guitars, and a great Rick Wright synthesizer solo. The next track is Have a Cigar, my absolute favorite Pink Floyd song. With a groovable tune, a great vocal line by Roy Harper, and an out of this world David Gilmour guitar solo, this is one of the more underrated songs in the entire Pink Floyd catalogue. The next song, Wish You Were Here, is another acoustic piece, with David Gilmour showing us again why he is considered one of the greatest guitarists in Progressive Rock. The finale to this album, Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part 2, is another epic tune in the same vein as Part One, although this one picks up faster. Great playing overall by everybody on this track.

Overall, this album is a crowning jewel in progressive rock. I give my highest recommendation.

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Send comments to Cygnus X-2 (BETA) | Report this review (#8820)
Posted Thursday, May 12, 2005 | Review Permalink
samlez_89@hot
5 stars I am 15 years old and Pink Floyd are still massive in my age group. WYWH has the second greatest song ever on it (wish you were here) only beaten by stairway to heaven. The two Shine on are a masterpeice, in my view every song on this album is a classic, almost every song is better than most of Dark Sides songs (minus Time and Money). The album reflects the harshness of living in this world, i think it is the best tribute to Syd that could ever be written, Syd fully deserves having the greatest album as a tribute to his fine work

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#8824)
Posted Thursday, June 02, 2005 | Review Permalink
ttaylor102003
5 stars Another excellent album from PF. It is bookended by Shine On You Crazy Diamond, which I find to be slightly overrated, although it is still quite good. It has some rocking solos from Gilmour, great vocals, and great saxophone. Normally, I do not like the saxophone, but this is an exception. The second track is the really dark sounding acoustic guitar/synth piece 'Welcome to the Machine' which has some of PF's best vocals ever. Then comes Have A Cigar, a great bluesy rocker, with some nifty synth riffs. It also features great vocals from Roy Harper. NIce solo too. Then comes the great title track. Featuring infamous acoustic guitar riffs and great vocals from Gilmour. Nice acoustic guitar solos too. Then it ends with Shine on You Crazy Diamond, which I have already reviewed. So this album is pretty much all great. The high points are: ALL SONGS.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#37320)
Posted Thursday, June 23, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars This is a masterpiece no doubt about it. Altough I was in love with the former records, I still believe Ummagumma it is the best record they ever recorded, I can´t turn my ears deaf to this set of songs so desperate to be heard. From the beginning you know that the rest is pure floyd. Keyboards and that soaring guitar in the main title. So if you are a true lover of progressive rock this is definetively a must have in your collection.

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Send comments to steelyhead (BETA) | Report this review (#37828)
Posted Monday, June 27, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars This album "Wish You Were Here" is an album that listens easily most in the masterpiece of Pink Floyd. "Shine on you crazy diamond" is the greatest famous piece of music. It might be all-time high Rock Epics to my desire. "Wish you were here" is a wonderful ballade too.

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Send comments to braindamage (BETA) | Report this review (#38056)
Posted Thursday, June 30, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd is one of my all time favorite bands, Dark side of the moon was the first classic rock CD i ever bought befor that album i only lisened to Nu metal and shush crap music. That album opened the doors for me in to a world of great music, greater then i culd ever imagine existed. Well eough of that on to the review of this great album Wish you where here, after sutch a timles masterpiece like DSOTM many surly must have tought that floyd was finished that they whuld never be abel to make another realy great great album ever again, and to the the truth they never did and album as great as DSOTM ever again, but they made some very close, and this was a fantatic follow up, this album is allmost as good as its precursor. The opener Shine on you crazy diamon is a mindblowing piece of amazingly beauty, the guitar work is yust to good it cant be real, thats what you will think when hearing it. All the song on the albm are realy good but SOYCD is with no doubt the best bothe of the parts are yust great and the closing part 2 is a great ending for a masterfull album, Welcome to the machin is a creepy tune with wierd keyboard sounds, but its a great song, Have a cigar is a cind of a comic relif on the album but not a letdown a great rocking tune. Then we have the title track a very good ballad about the former frontman Syd Barret a very tuching piece, and thats all there is to say, one of the best albums of all time from one of the best bands of all time who made so many timles classic albums. A must have.

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Send comments to Zargus (BETA) | Report this review (#38295)
Posted Saturday, July 02, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars After the huge success of Dark Side of the Moon, it's hard to imagine the amount of pressure the guys must've been under when it was time to do Wish You Were Here. So what can be said about the album, then?

Personally, this is my favorite Floyd album. Shine On You Crazy Diamond competes for the 'best PF song award' in my head, if not the 'best song ever award'. A weak spot can't be found on this classic release. From the excellent atmosphere of the intro to Shine On, to the haunting Welcome to the Macine, to the ballad-like greatness known as Wish You Were Here and back to Shine On again, this album is just an all around magnificent release. Yes, with only 5 tracks (4 if you count SOYCD as one), this album has no filler in it.

This album proves that working under pressure can be a good thing. Indeed, to this day, this album remains (as the ProgArchives rating says) a masterpiece of progressive music. I give this album 5 stars with no hesitation whatsoever.

To end this review in a mannerly fashion, I feel obliged to say I would gladly give up my left nut if I could see a live performance of this album.

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Send comments to Henkka (BETA) | Report this review (#38722)
Posted Thursday, July 07, 2005 | Review Permalink
kunangkunangku
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars This is my first introduction to Pink Floyd -- and progressive rock at the same time. It was back in mid-1970s. I bought it along with Deep Purple's "Made in Japan" cassette version. The first time I listened to it, right there at the track "Shine on You Crazy Diamond Pts. 1-5, I was like, "Man, this is a music from heaven."

Though it starts with a very leisurely pace, "Shine on..." is a showcase of the band's proficient in building a long yet thrilling soundscapes over a basically short tune. They manage to gradually reveal the magic of the song, which has to do with the theme about their founding member -- Syd Barrett. Gilmour's solo is a killer work, highly melodic and perfectly executed, while the other members' contributions unmistakably elevate the interaction between them to a higher, pleasurable place.

As amazing as "Shine on...", "Welcome to the Machine", "Have a Cigar" and "Wish You Were Here" consecutively deliver varied moods which are crafted masterfully based on whimsical lyrics and hook melodies and sound effects. Again, the interplay of Gilmour's guitar works and the other members' instruments play important parts here.

It's been more than 30 years now and my expectation of discovering new sensation is always fulfilled every time I listen to it. Without any doubt, I rate this album as the greatest Pink Floyd ever released. It's definitely an all-time classic within progressive rock territory.

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Send comments to kunangkunangku (BETA) | Report this review (#39659)
Posted Sunday, July 17, 2005 | Review Permalink
Zitro
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars This album is a masterpiece! I think of it as the artistic peak of Pink Floyd's musical career. It is a tribute to their ex-member 'syd barret'

Sine on You Crazy Diamond I 10/10 : Well, this song is so legendary, and the guitar is so beautiful that I love it. The song starts very slow like octavarium or Sky moves sideways. It then gets going after the famous 4-note guitar riff and the vocals start. The chorus is incredibly good! The song ends with a sax solo.

Welcome to the Machine : 9.5/10 : A very dark song with ambient noises and a loud acoustic guitar strumming. Gilmour's voice is at its best here, and Wright plays my favourite keyboard solos too.

Have a Cigar : 7.5/10 : the weakest song of the album. But that does not mean it is not good. The funky guitar/bass creats a great rhythm, and the synth riff is impossible to dislike.

Wish You Were Here : 10/10 : Probably my favourite pop song of all times and one of the main reasons I picked up the guitar. the intro is so simple with G chords, and slow solos, but sometimes simplicity can be good too. The verses/choruses and their lyrics are what made this song so popular ... the chord progression is simple, but it works!

Shine on You Crazy Diamond II : 8.5/10 : Well, while it is a good finisher for the album, I do not find it as strong as the first part. It still contains very solid musicianship all around and I love it.

If you are browsing this site and don't have this album, what are you waiting for? It is an essential purchase of not only prog rock, but rock history as a whole

My Grade : A

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Send comments to Zitro (BETA) | Report this review (#40507)
Posted Wednesday, July 27, 2005 | Review Permalink
memowakeman
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars Wish you were here.... Too Many people thinks that this album is overrated, some foolish says that the only good song here is wish you were here, but believe me, they are all wrong, and without fear to mistake me, I can assure them to all this is a masterpiece of pink floyd, and of the progressive rock, any proglover should have it, and is not sufficient with having it, but one must enjoy it. My favourite pink floyd song i can found herei, and its divided into two parts, is an epic and all a classic, song that was dedicated to the great Syd barrett, already all we know well his history.

Shine on you crazy diamond, without place to doubts is a representative song of the band, when we listen their name, immediately arrives us at the mind a powerful wow, a "what a beautiful song", because really is it, as much lyricist as musically and emotionally, here we find us with a lot of changes of humor but at the same time all they are yunited, we find a perfect sound,a perfect harmony, a mellancolic sound, silent that little to it goes enlarging, we find the necessary elements to pass over10 minutes of beautiful sound and beautiful music. one of the floyd´s characteristic is the sound of the sax, Dick Parry has a great sound, when the his music entry in the middle of the song is really marvelous, a different style gives him and an beautiful atmospere.

Welcome to the macihine (you can find it here in mp3), is for me the less significant and less pretty of the album, the start transports us immediately to think about some machine to which we are entering, and during all the song has a peculiar sound that maintains us listening it to the end.

Have a cigar, song that by unique and rare occasion is sung for a not member of the band, thing that does it very special still, but is a voice that remains him very well, and maybe with another voice not serious the same thing, is a song very complex musically speaking, the bass and the atmosphere are awesome.

Wish you were here, all a symbol, the sentimental side of the band, probably along with another brick in the wall part 2, is the only song of pink floyd that an ordinary person knows, really is not the complex song and well carried out, but if is a beauty, who not this hymn is known, who does not sing it, obviously dedicated too to Syd Barrett, an excellent song, in fact, just where should go, in the track 4.

Closing the album we found the continuation of the opening song and with the same name, shine on you crazy diamond, second part, maybe the darkest of the two, the less recognized but similarly beautiful, with the same escene, and the same depth of the first part, what a better way of finishing a masterpiece, that with a masterpiece. Without anymore to say, only that who doesnt has listened never this albm, run and do it.

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Send comments to memowakeman (BETA) | Report this review (#41438)
Posted Wednesday, August 03, 2005 | Review Permalink
three_of_a_pe
5 stars If there was a 6/5 rating I would certainly give it that rating along with Meddle, DSotM, and Animals, but I'm reviewing Wish You Were Here right now. The album starts off with the illusive first five parts of Shine on you Crazy Diamond, which well documents the soloing abilities VERY well of David Gilmour, Dick Parry, and some great organ work from Rick Wright. Good collaborative singing, sung by all except for Nick Mason. Great opening piece for the album, and documents well the talents of the band without compromising sounds, as Pink Floyd usually does. I'd give this track 5/5. Segues into Welcome to the Machine. Creepy keyboards and sound effects, creepily places guitar strums, and even a creepy bassline, which makes it sound like a machine. Semi-despressive song, because of the creepy style and only decorative percussion effects as opposed to Mason usualy style of playing. Rick Wright gets more recognition for this piece than he does in most pieces, with his keyboard "solos." They did a good delivering what they promised on this song; that is a very textured and creepy machine- like song. I give this track a 4.5/5. A more upbeat song, not by much however. Funk sounding guitar and bass, and even drums. Keyboards enter with the first melody, with its utter creepiness. Roy Harpers vocals come in and well compliment the song, and while the singing melody travels along there are little fills put in by Gilmour here and there. Drum beat change to 16th hi-hat beat, and guitar solo comes in and documents some funk sounds, while piano changes back to that creepy keyboard effect, creating neat polyphony. That fades out into the beginning dialogue of WYWH and it sounds like a tin can radio. I give this song 4.5/5 Wish You Were Here, a classical acoutstic piece by all members. Starting off with the quiet radio sounding guitar riff, and then a normal recording of the initial solo comes in, then allows for the rhythm to come back to full strength (good use of sound levels). Drums and piano later come in, and a second solo appears, building up well to the verse again. A scat vocal solo comes in at the end, and segues into the last 4 parts of Shine on you crazy diamond. I give this song 5/5. Excellent conclusion to a truly excellent album with only one verse instead of two, and about a minute shorter this song goes along the same lines of style as the first. Starts out with a neat guitar/bass rhythm, complemented by keyboard and drums. Keyboard solo comes next, with guitar's complementing rhythms. Numerous solos, and an overall ingenious song. I give it 5/5.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#42359)
Posted Wednesday, August 10, 2005 | Review Permalink
slack4justice
5 stars Pink Floyd may be the biggest name in prog. For a prog artist's best work to reach many non-prog listeners at such a level is a rare thing. Pink Floyd's best works have, despite the spaciness and oddness of their music at times, reached a huge audience. Surprisingly this doesn't mean to an intelligent and demanding listener that this material will be bad. In fact, Wish You Were Here is a masterful piece of work.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pts. 1-5 starts with spacy guitar, dragging into a trancing state with Gilmour's lead playing overlapping. It soon kicks into Waters and Gilmour's tribute to ex-bandmember and old friend Syd Barrett. Shine On You Crazy Diamond reflects Syd's perspective of the world and how it's affected the band, and the melody and texturing of the song in it's entirety is fantastic. Guitar and texture is rarely this engaging in this particular form. (9/10)

Welcome To The Machine is a brooding song with a pleading vocal tone. It's very heavy on texture and electronics, creating a real spacy atmosphere. It brings science fiction to reality in it's guitar and synth heavy nature. It's Pink Floyd's trademark spacy and oppressively impressive tone at it's finest. (9.5/10)

Have A Cigar brings a different tone to the album, recruiting an acoustic piano sound and a twangy guitar in addition to a similar tone to the previous songs. The vocals and musical interplay here are excellent, and the melodies are extremely memorable. (10/10)

Wish You Were Here comes in beautifully from the effect cutting Have A Cigar. The song is mostly acoustic, featuring some of the most memorable guitar moments and vocals, and when they meet it's magic. The song lifts into the next incredibly smoothly. (9/10)

Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pts. 6-9 returns to the elements of the first track, but adding a more improvisational touch and more texture to a jamming spree. The musical interplay here is beautiful, and this side of Floyd is rarely touched on. (9.5/10)

Wish You Were Here is constantly strong track after strong track, Pink Floyd's sound is not better represented anywhere else, and Pink Floyd's sound when in full effect is something to behold. [Reviewer's tilt: 9.5/10]

[OVERALL SCORE: 9.4 or 4.5 stars, rounded to 5 stars]

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#43482)
Posted Friday, August 19, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars The reason a few people consider DSOTM overrated is Alan Parsons production, which makes certain songs seem more complex and interesting then they actually are. Wish You Were Here proved that the band could still create a great album on their own.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond is a wonderful and beautiful epic, and the lyrics are a fantastic tribute to Syd Barrett. Not since Echoes had the band written a song and worked so well together as a band. No one member demonstartes dominance over the others musically, and there's some fantastic soloing from everyone.

Welcome to the Machine is a very dark and angst-filled track which shows a lot more Roger Waters influence, but the music is still very interesting, and the atmostphere this song creates. Try listening to this song on headphones while sitting in a crowded airport or train station, and the song becomes a lot more meaningful.

Have A Cigar is a faster paced song that feels more upbeat. The lyrics, like Welcome to the Machine, are directed toards the record industry, but unlike the previous song, the lyrics are lighthearted and humourous, and poke fun at the ignorance of the exectutives.

Even people who don't know who Pink Floyd is know and love the title track. It's a beautiful acoustic song that everyone who has ever lost someone can relate to. This song seamlessly transitions into the final song, a continuation of the epic first track.

This album is perfect. There's really nothing more to say. Syd Barrett couldn't have asked for a better tribute.

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Send comments to Harry Hood (BETA) | Report this review (#44002)
Posted Tuesday, August 23, 2005 | Review Permalink
ksb_333@yahoo
5 stars This is as good as it gets- clean superb music- with an excellent groove. The lyrics are typicall Floyd, (which is a very good thing) "Shine On" - even though its actually two songs- may be one the best songs ever written- its simply amazing. This album is a masterpiece- simply put. If you don't own it- you should reconsider what type of music to listen to!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#45079)
Posted Wednesday, August 31, 2005 | Review Permalink
Tony Fisher
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars On balance, probably Pink Floyd's most consistent album OVERALL but I think that PARTS of other albums are even better. There are no fillers or silly experimentation here, just 3 great and 2 good tracks. Welcome to the Machine, Have a Cigar and Wish you were Here are superb, their comparative simplicity adding to their effectiveness. Shine On parts 1 and 2 do not inspire in the same way (maybe a tribute to someone I don't rate at all colours my view?) but it's still good. Floyd are not instrumental virtuosos like Genesis or Yes but their compositions are often excellent. Here they don't quite hit the highest heights but the album is still worth buying. Not quite a masterpiece but very close. 4.5 stars and well worth buying.

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Send comments to Tony Fisher (BETA) | Report this review (#45642)
Posted Monday, September 05, 2005 | Review Permalink
Seyo
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars Should I really say anything, Vol. II?

This masterpiece of emotional and atmospheric music is my all time fav Floyd album and is the peak of progressive rock music and more... Wright especially shines here with his keyboards and synths, but all the band was in their top form. If possible I would give it 5,5 stars! Probably the last true masterpiece of the classic 1970s popular prog rock giants (aka "dinosauruses").

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Send comments to Seyo (BETA) | Report this review (#46446)
Posted Monday, September 12, 2005 | Review Permalink
horza
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars This was the first album I ever heard whilst wearing a new fangled invention called headphones.What a trip!!! Shine on was PHENOMENAL and transported me to a desert wasteland where Dave Gilmour and Rick Wright were laying down tasteful melodies that captured and fuelled my imagination.There are NO bad tracks on this album.Welcome to the Machine defies description but i will try.AWESOME.This album is timeless and should be sent across the universe to prove that their IS intelligent life out here.The best prog album ever.Ever.

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Send comments to horza (BETA) | Report this review (#47101)
Posted Sunday, September 18, 2005 | Review Permalink
Eclipse
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars The masterpiece of all masterpieces....the best album of all times.....

PINK FLOYD were enlightened on 1975. After making a huge earthquake on the world of music with their second best work, Dark Side of the Moon, and reaching the mainstream as succesful rock stars, they created their true magum-opus, which contains the most beautiful melodies you'll ever hear in music and some of the most intelligent lyrics ever composed by Waters, homaging Syd and atacking the hungry-for- money music executives who use the artists to fill their pockets wildly.

Wish You Were Here is carried with emotion from start to finish. PINK FLOYD was a prog band not interested on show instrumental virtuosity (like YES or EL&P), instead they decided to experiment what they could do making beautiful melodies but not overusing technique, they only let the emotion flow using all the resources they had to make their sound more well crafted. This worked perfectly on their golden Meddle - Animals era, their search for new textures on music made all the albums from this era sound very different from each other, and all of them were absolute masterpieces. They could have maintained the formula from Dark Side of the Moon, since it opened the doors of success for them, but again they decided to change the pace of their music, and this time to a more mellow tone based even more on emotion. In fact the only thing they kept from their last albums was the experimental factor, discovering new ways of complementing music by adding the classic sound effects (this time with machines, radio passages, falling star sounds - instead of clocks, cash machines or airplanes) and the epic structure from Meddle, with a magum opus giant track dividing the room with shorter songs that are also very good. But here we don't have things like "San Tropez" or "Seamus". This time things are going perfect, there's no "throwaways" or "weaker songs". Each minute here is used as if it was the last one they had to show their talents, and when i say "their" i DO mean "their", because this is also the last album that Roger Waters considers himself a member of the band and not "the band", so everyone still contributes here. Rick with his magical synths playing and atmospheric effects, Dave driving passionate guitar solos and vocals and Roger with his lyrics smart as always and with some more appealing subjects than the following "the world sucks" ones found on the next FLOYDIAN era, or "Watersian" which is the more adequate word to define it.

With a falling star the album opens with "Shine On I - IV". Part 1 contains some of the most moving melodies Rick and Dave ever put together. Both shine more than gold here, and both'em release passionate solos until Part 2 kicks in to show who is the best guitarist ever. With Syd's theme being played tears will probably come from your eyes since this is one of the most celestial things to ever come from a prog band. Now, suppose the tears haven't arrived yet. Maybe your eyes are saving it for Part 3, which is even more beautiful (if that's possible!) than the last two ones of the groundshaking epic. I'm not ashamed to say that even after three years of playing this part over and over i still feel moved by this third part at the point of having my eyes wet when i listen to that keyboard solo. Heaven! Just it...pure heaven! The vocals arrive and Roger works hard on his voice carrying emotion with beautiful lyrics, and then we have a sax solo courtesy of Dick Parry on the fifth part, leading to some werid machine noises.... Beep! "Welcome to the Machine" and its mechanical cold ambience appear. How can such a "cold" song have such a moving melody impresses me to no end, only the FLOYD could do something like this. It's a very unique progressive number, with a great acoustic guitar solo at the middle that is the second climax of the album (the first would be the ending of part 2 and part 3). Following the same kind of lyrics on "Have a Cigar" we have Gilmour's bluesy guitar and Roy Harper screaming the fakeness of the music executive intentions all in perfect shape. Fading in a radio sound, the title track that non-floyd fans think it is a love song (ouch) arrives in a long acoustic intro with another homage to Syd Barrett inside more touchy lyrics. Poetry and acoustic music at their best. Ending with some winds Shine On returns with its sixth part, the more upbeat one in a superb slide guitar work. Roger comes to sing more lines and then the trip goes to a funky territory, where saxes and synths domain before an ending piano - synth solo showing Rick putting his soul on those keys. The albums ends then, gloriously as it started.

Whoa, after all these 44 minutes of heaven music you'll be gasping for air, such emotion and creativity were never found on any other music album, PINK FLOYD successfully reached their peak, and made this solid masterpiece that will remain admired and inspiring on future generations for centuries from now, you bet!

This is the best of prog music, the best of music in general in fact and you can't consider yourself a music listener if you haven't listened to this beauty before. Well, if you haven't then what are you waiting for? There's always one neat copy of this on your nearest record store, just move and buy it! This is accessible music, and everyone should appreciate this (everyone who has a mature musical taste and is not limited to stupid three minutes long pop songs containing uninspired lyrics about how he or she loves his chick/guy, of course).

The supreme one of the six stars rating crew (formed by Foxtrot and Conquest of Paradise).

Wonderful that they didn't sustain the household objects idea!

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Send comments to Eclipse (BETA) | Report this review (#47233)
Posted Monday, September 19, 2005 | Review Permalink
zoa_the_dark@
5 stars Wish You Were Here-a tribute to Roger (Syd) Keith Barett. After "Dark side.." was released is when the band began to become undone...though there are very little signs of it. This was a very hard act, the follow up to a revolution. How do you do that? They did. It begins with Shine on You crazy diamond, and the special (and bizarre) thing about this track is that Syd after having no contact with the band for about seven years showed up! at the recording to that particular track! Richard Wright said:" He was bald fat and jumping up and down brushing his teeth" Welcome to the machine is good.. kind of overlong still good. "Have a cigar " (sung by Roy Harper) is also good, but the song by the same name of the album Wish you Were Here is the best song of the album and goes right up with the greatest Floyd songs..(money, another brick in the wall (pt2)comfortably numb.. etc) then shine on part 2...this is also one of there best and isn't ever matched musically again.5 out of 5

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#53558)
Posted Wednesday, October 26, 2005 | Review Permalink
broadwilliam@
3 stars How do you follow up an album like 'Dark side of the moon'? Well, with expectations so high, it's going to be hard to satisfy everybody. This is a good/ excellent album, but as a follow-up. it was an anti-climax for me then, and it still is. Maybe it needed more, shorter tracks.

3.5 stars.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#53810)
Posted Saturday, October 29, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars Considering the ridiculous expectations Pink Floyd had to reach after Dark Side of the Moon, it's hard to imagine that they could have done better than Wish You Were Here. Musically, the Floyd are bang on form, matching Waters intense brilliance with sublime playing. David Gilmour's guitar work is the best of his career and Rick Wright's atmospheric keyboards provides a "musical colors" for the band to use. Although far more personal than any other Pink Floyd work to date, this album bristles with anger, self-loss, confusion, and hope.

1. Shine on you crazy diamond Part one - has a great synth solo from Rick, great guitar solos from Dave and vocals sung passionately by Roger Waters, the sax at the end by Dick Parry is really good. This song also aims to make a public statement about Barrett's tragic decline into madness. 5/5

2. Welcome to the machine - its use of the VCS3 synth and multiple David Gilmours singing the vocal and nice acoustic guitar touches from Dave as well and nice tympani flourishes by Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason. 4.5/5

3. Have a cigar - is sung by Roy Harper and Dave's guitar work was killer. 4.5/5

4. Wish you were here - a great vocal from Dave and nice acoustic work as well and great keyboard work from Rick also. Surrealistic!5/5

5. Shine on you crazy diamond Part two - The wind at the end of song segues into Shine On...(Parts 6-9) and features this time great lap steel guitar work from Dave and great use of the Moog and ARP synthesizers by Rick and Roger sings the last section of the epic(which only has one verse anyway in part 7) that began the album and continued on side two. Part 8 was a great jazz/blues jam and Part 9 was a somber though beautiful synth solo from Wright. Awesome!! 5/5

Final Note: Overall , "Wish You Were Here" provides a fantastically written tribute to former band leader Syd Barret (in "Shine On.." and the title track), and a crass, sarcastic thumb at record companies (Welcome To The Machine, Have A Cigar). Most bands wouldn't be able to fit both on one record, but Floyd did so, and still managed to maintain complete artistic integrity. Highly Recommended!

5+4.5+4.5+5+5 = 24

24 : 5 = 4,8

Essential: a masterpiece of progressive music

Curiosity: During the Wish You Were Here recording sessions, Syd Barrett just happens to wander into Abbey Road studio while Pink Floyd are mixing "Shine On You Crazy Diamond," a song written about Barrett. At first, none of Syd's former bandmates recognizes the fat, bald lunatic who is compulsively brushing his teeth. Roger Waters and Rick Wright cried when they realized that was Syd Barrett.

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Send comments to Marquês_Prög (BETA) | Report this review (#56200)
Posted Sunday, November 13, 2005 | Review Permalink
hoggstar2000@
5 stars This album is probably overlooked because of the huge sucess of dark side of the moon but it is the best pink floyd album. The songs each provide different mood. Wish you were here is a calming soothing song with great simply lirics. Welcome to the machine has a dark feeling to it and shine on is a great tributre to sid barret and I personally belive that is the best pink floyd song ever.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#58520)
Posted Tuesday, November 29, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars The hardcore Floyd-fan favorite: Wish You Were Here. And for good reason. The album really is a masterpiece. I've of the opinion that if you discount this album as not a masterpiece you'll be hard pressed to list any in that category.

And contained within the album in the hardcore Floyd-fan favorite track: "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". Again, for good reason. The composition on this song is superb. Waters wrote typically genious lyrics and I'd say that some of the greatest Gilmour soaring guitar took place in this song.

The album is also great because none of the songs sound alike. The compositions were dynamic to the point where it's incredible any band could write such disparate songs during the same writing period. That is, besides Shine On Parts I-V and then parts VI-IX. Apparently Waters planned to release all parts of the song on a single side but was dissauded during the production sessions. Which reminds me of the interesting stop-by visit of Barret during the recording in which none of the members identified him at first as he'd shaved his head.

Returning to topic, WYWH also has three important and wonderful middle tracks. Welcome to the machine set the tone for what would later become Animals. The eerie and unnerving drive of the song appears now premeditated by Waters as he prepared listeners for a less cheerful and peaceful sound.

Then biting the hand that feeds them they add 'Have a Cigar' to the album. The vocals were really good. I know that Waters wasn't comfortable singing them, although I reamin unsure of why Gilmour didn't sing them. Gilmour's voice can be powerful and rockish when it needs to be as evidenced later on 'Young Lust'. Nonetheless the choice was strong.

The title track is one of my favorite songs. It transcends musical boundaries not in the way that in infuses an incredible and almost suspect number of influences, but rather in the way that it attracts the ear of nearly all people who listen to it. The lyrics are also heartfelt and easy to understand. The sincerity on the track was probably so real because of the deep sentiments felt by the band for their long departed leader.

It listened to this album at a time when I had a relative lull in my musical expansion. I'd not found any bands I truly loved in a couple years and I then really discovered Pink Floyd (rather late - it was during university) in their entirety and it honestly made me a bit happier in everything I did, just knowing I'd reignited such a great passtime - listening to music.

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Send comments to AngleofRepose (BETA) | Report this review (#59182)
Posted Monday, December 05, 2005 | Review Permalink
Atkingani
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5 stars A real MASTERPIECE, probably the best Pink Floyd album. It's a pity that this fabulous work is sometimes underrated when compared with previous and more known DSotM but WYWH is better and shall be placed among the 10 top progressive albums ever.

All that pretentiousness and affectation observed in DSotM gave room to a more mature and balanced approach either for the songs themselves or the band musicianship that are superb.

The songs: 1&5) Shine on you crazy diamond (pts. 1 & 2) - touching, meaningful, excellent.

2) Welcome to the machine - some effects remind us early Floyd's songs, others seem to prepare us for the future; singing is fantastic, just like the ever-present synth, giving the impression we are really inside some kind of engine.

3) Have a cigar - a good track, although the less-strong in the album, but still worthy and interesting.

4) Wish you were here - perhaps the song that people will remember PF in the distant future - or even remember as a whole the last quarter of the XXth century. A hymn.

Nothing more 'I think I can tell' and the final rating is obvious: 5 stars.

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Send comments to Atkingani (BETA) | Report this review (#62235)
Posted Thursday, December 29, 2005 | Review Permalink
ofurglassi@ho
4 stars Well well Mr. Floyd, how did you manage to make a decent album after all these years of boring stuff? After the trainwreck that was Dark Side of the Moon this album is certainly a welcome surprise. Taking into consideration Floyd's tendency for long aimless and boring tracks that go absolutely nowhere, Shine On You Crazy Diamond is unusually entertaining and surprise surprise actually goes somewhere. The rest of the album however is the usual boring Floyd drivel that nobody likes if they aren't on drugs.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#62391)
Posted Friday, December 30, 2005 | Review Permalink
5 stars Masterpiece!!! This album is surely one of the best ever. It even outdistanced its predecessor - The Dark Side Of The Moon. Great atmosphere. Great music. Great lyrics. Ideal.

Fist track is Shine On You Crazy Diamond. I love Waters singing verses in this song. When I hear it I just want to cry. So beautyful. Then, there is Welcome to The Machine. Very dark piece of music. The following track is Have a Cigar. Very good rock with nice parts of guitar and Roy Harper on vocal. And then Wish You Were Here - the most beautyful ballad ever. In the end - Shine On reprise, with fantastic change of themes, and very sad final organ solo.

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Send comments to Publius84 (BETA) | Report this review (#64639)
Posted Friday, January 13, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars My first album ever purchased in the world. This album, to me, is probably the closest to perfection out of all of Pink Floyd's works. Not to say that Dark Side of the Moon isn't awesome as hell but... how can you argue with the extremely selfless act of dedicating a musical masterpiece to your (now) mentally lost best friend? This album as a whole brought Pink Floyd closer together than any album could probably help to bring a band together, with every band member adding his own perfect addition to aspects of this album. And lets not forget about Dick Perry's AWESOME sax playing.

And, if you haven't yet, read up on the relation between Syd Barrett and the rest of Pink Floyd then listen to this album again while paying especially close attention to the lyrics. If you can't appreciate the awe that is that writing then... you might want to re-evaluate your position on this site in general. THEN! listen to the album again while paying particular attention to the instrumental work, especially the guitar. Because, guys... to me... there has never been a guitar that has weeped so much in the history of rock. Sorry Paul McCartney.

Absolutely perfect and fantasic in every sense of the word. I usually alternate between this or Dark Side of the Moon being my favorite album of all time but... right now... Wish You Were Here is IT! The album doesn't drag on, it doesn't start particularly slow and the track transitions are flawless. Also, to say that just one track is better than all the others belittles the true greatness that is this album. Just think of it all as one approprately lengthed song that was dedicated to the guitarist, the originator, the epic and the friend that is Syd Barrett.

10 out of 5 stars... all the way...

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Send comments to Legoman (BETA) | Report this review (#67561)
Posted Tuesday, January 31, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars A great album. Probably the classic one. I have a high sentimental link with this one, in fact i still consider it as the masterpiece that changed my musical point of view forever, so long ago.

It´s difficult to say anything new after 218 reviews, so this won´t be long. I really believe that this kind of albums, the next ones after a huge success -on sales and on critics - like dark side was, have a very difficult road because the comparison is innevitable. On the other hand, of course, their comercial career is almost guaranteed. Thinking about this, for me WYWH was enough able to satisfy both critics and public.

The core of the work is "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", in its nine parts, a tribute to their former member, Syd Barret. It would be the last whole band composition because of the growing leadership of Roger Waters.The title track is also a classic floyd track, the last remembering of their lost friend...or anything else. Thoughout the album, the most brilliant work of Richard Wright in the group works.

The album topped the charts on America and UK. It was my very first experience with prog rock. I haven´t forgot it.

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Send comments to rgmeli64 (BETA) | Report this review (#68170)
Posted Friday, February 03, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars There's not a lot I can say that you won't have read in almost every other review. This album is a complete and utter masterpiece, from start to finish, and is easily my favourite of Floyd's releases.

Every track is superb, from the spacey and atmospheric 'Shine On' suite, to the amazingly beautiful acoustic title track, which is my favourite of the five tracks present.

If you're a Floyd fan, a prog fan, or just a fan of good music, you need to have this in your collection. It is one hundred percent essential!

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Send comments to Degolas (BETA) | Report this review (#68527)
Posted Monday, February 06, 2006 | Review Permalink
Ken4musiq@yah
5 stars So what happened to the mellotron . . . this album. Wish You Were Here created symphonic and atmosphereic textures without a mellotron. Sure others, Tangerine Dream to name one, had done it before, but this album popularized it and put it into a rock context.

In 1975 Pink Floyd was very special. They were popular enough to be on the radio, but still out there enough to write Shine on You Crazy Diamond. The theme of insanity as the sane outlet to an insane world is central to the classic era of progressive rock. Waters tackles it here better than most with this story of Syd Barrett's descent into insanity. Waters uses it to outline a critique of the burgoening music conglomeration that was not only stifling artistic growth, but cultural growth in the process. This critique would become the basis of The Wall, which in many ways is a continuation of this album and its subsequent Animals.

This album is transportive, transcendent in the way that progressive music is known for. It is one of the classic albums of the genre.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#68729)
Posted Tuesday, February 07, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars "Dark Side of the moon" was a great album, "Wish you were here" is simply outstanding. Great music, great lyrics, flawless songs... an essential album.

The highlights on the album are... all the songs. From the epic "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" (both parts) to the sombre "Welcome To The Machine", the pop-rock "Have A Cigar" and the arch-ballad "Wish You Were Here". A well deserved 5 stars.

Rating: 94/100

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Send comments to zaxx (BETA) | Report this review (#68798)
Posted Wednesday, February 08, 2006 | Review Permalink
infandous@exc
4 stars A perfect album, with no weak spots...........that I find somewhat boring these days. Still, this along with Animals gave me many many hours of pleaure back in my Floyd addiction days so I can't give it a low rating. And there is not a bad song on it, or even a weak one. I think my tastes have just moved on, and I don't own this album anymore. Is it a masterpiece? Probably. But I will give it 4 stars for the fact that I don't have an interest in it anymore (unlike the album Meddle) and conversely because I did love it so much in the past.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#68870)
Posted Thursday, February 09, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars The icy, atmospheric first few minutes that open this album send shivers down my spine every time I hear it. As Gilmour's guitar enters, there is an emotional response that happens that not many other tracks can outdo. The beauty of 'Shine on you Crazy Diamond' cannot easily be put into words, everything about this track seems perfected, the keyboards, taking all the time it needs to create a soundscape of music that allows the listener to drift pleasurably into, the lyrics, Water's plea for his old friends return is extremely powerful, the sincerity and meaning in his words give the track a depth that is not easily reached 'Remember when you were young, you shone like the sun, shine on you crazy diamond', almost every note from Gilmours guitar touches the listener, evocative, wistful solos and strong melodies. Broken into nine or so sections that bookend the album, and altogether reaching twenty six minutes, in my opinion, the best piece of music Pink Floyd ever wrote. There is added saxophone from Dick Parry and amazing backing vocals from Venetta Fields and Carlena Williams, the track has so much to offer, it never loses ones attention. Part two has a surprisingly jazzy edge to it at times and some wonderful instrumentation from the band. The keyboard outro has a very hopeful air to it, and ends the piece perfectly.

Wish You Were Here's concept is based around the founding genius of Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett, it speaks of how Syd has a light that should never be put out, a person with much charisma and talent that became the victim of stardom and drug abuse. Waters lyrics are also centered around the record companies callousness and desire to 'Ride the Gravy Train', a bold statement and a message that still holds a lot of truth today.

The three songs that make up the centre of the record are perfect, 'Welcome to the Machine' follows 'Shine On part one' and the contrast between the two is startling. This track has a much harsher edge, it's very dark, very claustrophobic, not very musical due to the sounds of various machines in the background, this seems like a stab at the record companies that Syd was made a victim of. For 'Have a Cigar' Roy Harper makes a powerful guest vocal, his singing almost sounding like a sneer at points, Water's lyrics here are a cynical stab at how big time record co. executives have only a care for money and sales 'It could be made into a monster, if we all pull together as a team', the music is excellent, a quirky bass and guitar riff drives the track, giving it a lot of energy and life, excellent keyboard work also. 'Wish You Were Here' is the most well known track, not many people mention Gilmour's beautiful acoustic guitar solo at the beginning, a very delicate and emotional track.

Wish You Were Here is in my opinion, even stronger than the album before it 'The Dark Side of the Moon', a consistent masterpiece that had strong messages complimented with colourful and beautiful music.

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Send comments to Winter Wine (BETA) | Report this review (#69280)
Posted Monday, February 13, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Athough I'm a classic and hard rock fan rather than prog, I could easily say that Wish You Were Here is the best album of all time. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond part 1" and "Wellcome To The Machine" are thrilling for me in absolutely every second of play. Even without paying attention to lyrics, these songs send exact message through emotion they create with sound. Other songs are awesome as well, and considering whole album as one piece of music (which it, as concept album and tribute, actually is), whole picture becomes even more impressive. This one is for History! Well done Pink Floyd!

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Send comments to coa190 (BETA) | Report this review (#71880)
Posted Tuesday, March 14, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Maybe the best mini-concept album (right after Selling England). Includes only 5 songs, which all are stunning.

The album starts with "Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part I", which I consider the best PF song. It's so amazing how they can make the first 8 minutes so exciting even though it's repeating itself. Then comes the great vocals and it grows a bit to the end.

The second is also wonderful, "Welcome To The Machine" starts with some funny noises and grows with the exciting, kinda rough vocals. I love this song.

"Have A Cigar" is a poppish song, with some psychedelic effects. Some would say this is a weak song cause it's kinda catchy. Well I can't say anything bad about it. Amazing.

"Wish You Were Here" is the ballad here, vocals are awesome and the acoustic guitar is so beautiful. Some people tend to whine about this also, I can't say anything bad about it. It somewhat fills this album.

The album ends with the "Shine on Part II", it's more faster and jazzy than the first part. It's also damn good but not as good as the first part.

The album itself is a "tribute" to their former guitarist Syd Barrett, watch the lyrics. They're interesting (if you're a first-timer). Overall this album is a masterpiece. Not a single boring moment in it. Close to perfection.

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Send comments to Ounamahl (BETA) | Report this review (#73841)
Posted Sunday, April 02, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars One of the greatest albums of all by the Greatest Prog band ever!!! (ok - slight bias here) I am trying to review lesser known albums instead of the well known ones... but I had to do this one. This is a fantastic album, as with all Floyd, I can still listen to them even for the millionth time. All the tracks are standouts - no filler here. The album was written mostly by Roger Waters about the ex-Floyd member Syd Barrett, and how fame & drugs contributed to his breakdown. I'm not going to say too much about the album as there is not much that hasn't been said already.

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Send comments to freebird (BETA) | Report this review (#74910)
Posted Friday, April 14, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd started out under the direction of a man named Syd Barrett. Unfortunately, soon after the band's first album ("Piper at the Gates of Dawn") came out, Syd started heavily experimenting with drugs. As he became more and more unstable, the rest of the group was forced to let him go so that he could seek the mental help that he desperately needed. Soon afterward the band's bassist, Roger Waters, took over. Roger followed in the similiar vein of long, meaningful songs; but inserted a bit more energy and occasionally a few extremely cynical commentaries. After the commercial success of Dark Side, Pink Floyd as a group became wary of moulding into the shape of the 5 minute singles band that Dark Side seemed to suggest. So, for their next outing Roger decided that he would take Floyd back to their roots, and subsequentely wrote "Wish You Were Here", an ode to the band's original frontman Syd.

While by no means the commercial success that Dark Side was, WYWH was pure Pink Floyd. Featuring a single 25 minute long song (Shine on You Crazy Diamond pts 1&2) and a few 5-8 minute long ones, this album was far closer to what longtime Pink Floyd fans were used to. The first song besides Shine On is "Welcome to the Machine", a song about the music industry and how focused it seems on simply pumping out premade hits, whether they be the all-too familiar boy bands or the other side of the spectrum, the more varied appearing but still preformatted heavy metal and punk bands (from the song: "You bought a guitar to punish your Ma; you didn't like school, and you know you're nobody's fool"). The next one is "Have a Cigar", a song from the point of view of a music company executive trying to buddy up to the band that he thinks will make him millions, while showing that he has no actual deep interest in them beyond their monetary income (from the song: "And by the way, which one's Pink?"). The last of the shorter songs, and by far the best, is the title song "Wish You Were Here". This song features a rare tear-bringing solos by Gilmour on an acoustic guitar. This song is by far one of the most heartfelt songs ever written by Pink Floyd, an honest, heartfelt message to Syd (from the song: "How I wish, how I wish you were here. We're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl, year after year. Rinning over the same old ground. What have found? The same old fears, wish you were here."). Then, of course, there is "Shine On", a song about perserverence throughout the hardships of life.

Musically, the album is just as incredible as the lyrics. It contains stunning synth compositions in "Shine On", incredible bass riffs (far superior to "Money") in "Have a Cigar", and heartstring pulling acoustics in "Wish You Were Here". Floyd is in better than top form here, and show just why they're one of the greatest bands ever.

Well, to wrap things up, I can say nothing better than to take me on faith and get this album. .... Rock has it's own unsung heroes, and none greater than "Wish You Were Here".

"Come on you raver, you seer of visions, come on you painter, you piper, you prisoner and shine!"

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Send comments to The Union (BETA) | Report this review (#75241)
Posted Monday, April 17, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars I've always love Pink Floyd and have growned fond them since i was in middle school. now i'm 19 and love them even more....so why didn't i ever get any of there albums. Well that all changed when i finally got in my opinion one of Pink Floyd's best WISH YOU WERE HERE. Now i love DARK SIDE OF THE MOON and i've heard and love COMFORTABLE NUMB, ECHOES, and ONE OF THESE DAYS but this album has def. shown just how great Pink Floyd are. First off the lyrics of this album are superb as WATERS wrote the lyrics talking about the music world, friendship, and a special lyrical tribute to the FLOYDIAN founding member SYD BARRETT. Second each band member does a surperb job on each track with both part of SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND displaying the smooth soloing of GILMOUR, some tight drums and bass by WATERS and MASON, and WRIGHT just shining on throgh this song especailly part 2. This song does really well with building up from the tiny sounds of music building its way to full band sound of greatness. Definitley a progger's epic favorite and if you haven't heard this song where the heck have you been. Then you have WELCOME TO THE MACHINE very effective song. i haven't had this album long and i may be wrong but unfortnately Mason doesn't play this tune but the rest of the band does very well especially WRIGHT on the keyboards as he does a surperb job using a lot of synth stuff through out the entire song. Next you have one of my favorite FLoyd track HAVE A CIGAR this song is just awesome with a nice boomy rhythmic bass line and a cool synth hook and Gilmour just blowing you away with a very bluesy yet proggy yet just awesome solo that ooooooh man i dunno i love it. Then comes another great acoutic Floyd dedication song WISH YOU WERE HERE this song just brings a tear to your eye with its awesome lyrcis and great acoustic stuff by Gilmour. plus the vocals here are superb as well. So if there is some old prog you wanna get into trust me WISH YOU WERE HERE is a great start as you've got stuff in this album that will definitely take you through a magic journey of pure progginess.

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Send comments to Progdrummer05 (BETA) | Report this review (#75983)
Posted Sunday, April 23, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd's masterpiece of progressive music; don't be fooled into thinking of Dark Side Of The Moon, this is the album you need.

The soaring epic "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" opens and closes the album in traditional spacey Floyd style, with Wright laying down some of the most beautiful keyboard lines creating the perfect backdrop for Gilmour's bluesy guitar to scream along to. Roger Water's vocals on this track are nothing less than perfect. He pours out emotions in his voice that you wont even know existed.

"Have A Cigar" features some interesting vocals by Roy Harper which really spices up the track. Most notable here are the lyrics, critiquing the music business, some of the best Roger ever wrote, and the chilling keys by Wright will stay with you long after playing the album. The title track, a gentle acoustic ballad, is simply the most emotional piece of music ever recorded. Standing alone this would make the album worth buying. The dark "Welcome To The Machine" is the weakest track on the album, sometimes a little slow moving but ultimately still entertaining but may grow a little old with repeated listens.

This is the best place to start with Floyd and any prog fan will be able to appreciate the genius leaping from this album.

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Send comments to Equality 7-2521 (BETA) | Report this review (#76136)
Posted Monday, April 24, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Masterpiece. Masterpiece. One more time? Masterpiece. Like a few others, I believe this to be PF's masterpiece, rather than the overrated DSOTM.

I believe SOYCD is the best thing the band ever did (or will do, since it doesn't seem like they're getting back together any time soon) and with it taking up about 60% of the album, it's hard to argue for a different album of theirs to be my favourite. The middle three tracks are all pretty good, with Have a Cigar probably being the standout. They're all about four star efforts by themselves, but the over-sidelong piece is what puts the album over the top. Worth about 4.75, rounding up to 5. Maybe if they'd put SOYCD and Dogs together, they could've had an easy 5. But even as it stands, it's not really anything to complain about.

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Send comments to dagrush (BETA) | Report this review (#77200)
Posted Friday, May 05, 2006 | Review Permalink
fcoulter@oroc
5 stars What do you do after suddenly finding your nice avant garde progressive rock band being played by the masses? What do you do?

In addition to going back to your roots and writing a long extended piece (Shine On You Crazy Diamond), you also look seriously at your industry and your role in it. And those are the songs that stick with me.

Welcome to the Machine - how your audience's hopes, dreams, and aspirations are affected by the media (which includes popular music)

Have a Cigar - on how little knowledge or love of the arts you'll find in the corporate board rooms which are so necessary for mass production and marketing of music

I also enjoyed the rest of the album, but I'm not going to go on to vast lengths about it.

I do want to add that great music doesn't require vast technical skills. Sometimes, playing the right note at the right time is all that's needed. Pink Floyd is a master at choosing the right notes. None of the members of Pink Floyd feel the need to show off their technical prowess. They just play the right note at the right time.

More power to them.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#78190)
Posted Sunday, May 14, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Just a great album to listen to from start to finish. No other song is as atmospheric as Shine on you Crazy Diamond (both parts), or as compelling. I could listen to it repeatedly for hours on end. There is absolutely no filler on this album. Every song is great. One of the best albums ever.

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Send comments to rnelson (BETA) | Report this review (#78213)
Posted Monday, May 15, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here is my favourite Pink Floyd Album. Although Dark Side of the Moon is more famous and commercialy successful than WYWH is doesn't sound as complete to me. Wish You Were Here starts off with Shine on You Crazy Diamond Part 1 which is a very mellow and somber song that picks up around the middle when the vocals come in. Gilmour is much more present on this album than the others leading up to it. Every song showcases his talents both in guitar and vocals.

The next song "Welcome to the Machine" is a creepy song with beautiful effects and instrumentation. The vocals are dark and are kept more in the background than the foreground and help the songs overall feel.

Song three is "Have a Cigar" which is a more pop/rock song compared to the others with a good bass and guitar riff and cool keyboard runs. The song also features a beautiful Gilmour style solo. He is one of those guitarists that have a tone all their own and is so recognizable even to a person just starting to listen to Floyd and prog in general.

"Wish You Were Here" is a nice acoustic song that most people can latch on to and love. People who don't dwell deeper into Floyd's catalogue will still know this song well and be able to sing along.

"Shine on you Crazy Diamond Part 2" is the finale to the album and goes out in a bang. It starts off with a grumbling bass line, very similar to sheep on Animals which followed this album, and progresses into a high pitched guitar solos that reach the upper extremes of a guitars range. It then breaks down into the vocal section and finishes off with a funky clavinet solo with nice guitar licks along with it.

This is the most complete Pink FLoyd album in my opinion. Every song on it can stand alone but together they are even more brilliant as they nicely flow into eachother. I give this album 5 stars.

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Send comments to Buckethead1 (BETA) | Report this review (#78592)
Posted Thursday, May 18, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Another album, which by now doesn't need a total dissection. My second favortie Floyd album, and it's my goal to review each one, so I'm going to do so anyways.

Much like DSOTM, "Wish You Were" beings and ends in the same manner, this time with the epic eulogy to Syd Barret "Shine on You Crazy Diamond". The opening two minutes is one of coolest intros ever, and sets it up as an epic. From a simple four note theme to a complex guitar solo, the song covers a wide range of style, while at the same time keeping the same form. The lyrics are mournful and amazing, the lyrics just as cool.

"Welcome to the Machine" is another great song, and while many consider it the weakest part of the album, if it is the weakest, it's still incredibly strong. The vocals of the song and the instrumentation perfectly reflect the title of the song, and the whole thing almost sounds mechanical

"Have a Cigar" contains the hardest bass riffas of any PF song, and Harper's vocals don't sound terribly out of place (and it is actually better in the aspect that it is being sung by a record executive, and ot by one of the band members, a neat effect"

"Wish You Were Here" is a great ballad and is another song in tribute to Syd, although it can be applied to anyone. It can be a ballad to a lost friend or to someone you really loves, or in some cases, both

another 5-star alnum from one of the most influential bands in history

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Send comments to echoes2112 (BETA) | Report this review (#78734)
Posted Friday, May 19, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars What can you say about Pink Floyd at it best, this album is the reason my interest in music started, it's a masterpiece of modern and classical psychedelic rock, un-doubtfully Pink Floyd Best record and one of the best albums ever. Combined with Animals, these two albums represent the best time of the Pink Floyd Sound they have some of the best musical pieces, and the best lyrics Roger Waters, or anyone ever created. Just Great Easily the Best album Ever or at least a perfect album.

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Send comments to CHOCO (BETA) | Report this review (#78801)
Posted Saturday, May 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
c.hankinson@n
5 stars My favourite album of all time. It might have helped that I heard it the day it came out whilst tripping on some really good Acid. But having said that it still knocks Dark Side into a top hat, it has power, feeling, awesome musicianship, great arrangements and for me encapsulates all that is good in music. I had thought that Floyd had lost the way after Echoes, but how wrong I was - Wish You Were Here - Pink Floyd - Top Album - Top Band.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#78853)
Posted Saturday, May 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
4 stars This, to me, is by far the better album when compared to Dark Side of the Moon; from the beautifully languorous intro, Wright and Gilmour in perfect harmony, to the lovely Wish You Were Here (I and 2). The lyrics are heartfelt and more relevant than many of Waters'.

Only four stars though; Floyd are a little too sedate for me...

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Send comments to bruin69 (BETA) | Report this review (#78857)
Posted Saturday, May 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars It was some time into my Pink Floyd exploration before I discovered the genius of Wish You Were Here, and since I have never looked back.

This album essentially finds a happy medium between the two albums that came just before and just after it. Dark Side of the Moon was Pink Floyd's deepest electronic exploration, with a surrealist-tinged vocal and lyric style, based around many medium- lengthed tracks. Animals was a guitar-driven piece of social commentary based around three long tracks. Wish You Were Here takes the vivid, surreal feel of Dark Side and the heavily emotional playing of Animals, melding them into the perfect album.

The songs build up perfectly into cathartic moments of emotional outburst. Pink Floyd are the masters of this. You do not listen to this music looking to be blown away by fast guitar solos or technical time changes. They are all about playing the right notes at the right time, and few bands do it better.

One of my favorite things about this album is that the tracks all segue into each other perfectly. As a result you have already adjusted mood by the time the next song starts; there is no rough transition from being in one emotional space and suddenly being forced into another. This album is obviously meant to be digested in a full 45 minute dose, and I wouldn't have it any other way. Listening to this album is an encompassing, visual experience, best done with eyes closed and the lights off.

Dark Side is often acclaimed for its pioneering of electronic sound at the time, but I can't even begin to imagine how they pulled off "Welcome to the Macine" in 1975. To this day I consider it the ultimate fusion of rock-oriented songwriting and experimental electronic sounds.

Thank God Pink Floyd was one of the few 70's prog bands to actually do something dynamic with their vocals. The range of style here is incredible: the machine-like droning of Welcome to the Machine, balladic beauty of Wish You Were Here, the punchy hard rock style of Have A Cigar, its all here, and because of it Pink Floyd has life that no other prog band can hold a candle to.

They might be remembered for Dark Side and The Wall, but spend some time to dig into their music and I think you will find this a hell of an album.

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Send comments to int_2375 (BETA) | Report this review (#79490)
Posted Saturday, May 27, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars How do you follow up "The Dark Side of the Moon"? How do you follow up one of the biggest selling albums of all time? How do you follow up such a perfect blend of jazz and rock and genius? Pink Floyd answered that question very well with "Wish You Were Here".

The album starts off slowly, with the smoothness of "Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I, II, III, IV, and V)". A brilliantly epic track comemorating the mental collapse of former frontman Syd Barret is as touching as it is amazing. It was also a good idea to use Dick Parry on saxophone again, to give the song a little something different yet keep it reminiscent of "The Dark Side of the Moon."

Next up is "Welcome to the Machine", a swooping space rock opus that only Floyd can do. A great song to expand your mind, sober or otherwise.

"Have a Cigar" is by far my favourite Floyd track of all time. It's the song that got me into progressive rock in the first place. The wicked bass licks courtesy of Roger Waters, David Gilmour's mindblowing guitar solo, and Roy Harper's perfect vocals make this the most memorable track on the album.

The title track to the song is most likely one of the most well-known Floyd songs, and for good reason. It's sheer simpliciy and jaw-dropping lyrics make this song a true classic.

Finally, the album ends with the stunning concluding parts of "Shne on you Crazy Diamond". Part VII, with it's jazzy feel, has got to be the best Floys instrumental section ever.

Overall, this album is a masterpeice, and is a true classic in all of music.

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Send comments to The Green Tank (BETA) | Report this review (#79567)
Posted Saturday, May 27, 2006 | Review Permalink
Trybiszon@int
5 stars I find this album as the greatest work of Pink Floyd - it is still inspirating, but it has more relaxing atmosphere, comparing i with really DARK SIDE OF THE MOON and sad THE WALL. The SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND SUITE really makes me fly away toa better world, when I can shine like a sun. I can' express it by words, especially with my poor English... HAVE A CIGAR is just a great song, he same thing is with WISH YOU WRE HERE, which could beplayed by some folk group (I'd like to hear Tom Petty's version!). And WELCOME TO THE MACHINE is a first industial song ever - much before Throbbing Gristle, Einsturzende Neubauten or NIN - and it is still the greatest work of all industrial genre.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#80868)
Posted Saturday, June 10, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd's Other Masterpiece

This album is tied with Animals for my favorite Pink Floyd album and my favorite album of all time. It's perfect. The packaging is, as always with Floyd, absolutely wonderful; however, I think this is Floyd's best packaging. The cover is, of course, one of the best and most iconic in rock, and the lyrics booklet has some wonderful photographical goodness from Storm. The lyrics are some of Waters' best, focusing on the fallen Syd Barrett and the evils of the music industry. However, I know that when you first listen to this, you will say, "THIS is Floyd's best album? Forget them!" But give it time. And I think many of their albums are very, very close to being as good as this one. But then again, I am a huge Floyd fan.

The tone is a bright and reflective one. I always associate this album with Summer, because I first got it in the summer, and the feel of the music is very airy and atmospheric, even if the lyrics aren't; whereas, Animals is very much a dark, bitter winter album.

SOYCD pt. 1--Honestly, there's nothing more that can be said about this one. It's Floyd's most famous prog piece, and rightly so.

Welcome to the Machine--This is more of a grower; although the speed of SOYCD takes some getting used to, many people have some trouble with this one. I'm not sure why; I thought it was better than the title track on first listen, but lots of other people don't. Just a warning. I think it's a wonderful song.

Have a Cigar--A very sarcastic song about the music industry. The most upbeat song on the album, it has a funky groove and Roy Harper on vocals, since Gilmour was very tired and Waters' voice was burnt out from so many takes of SOYCD. As you might know, Waters is tone-deaf, so he had to sing the vocals over, and over, and over again until he got it right--because he was singing out of key.

WYWH--The only song from this album that gets regular classic rock radio air play. Which may not be a good thing. It's still a great song, although it's a bit more in the pop vein; but if you want something that's completely uncommercial, then I advise you to head to the Avant-Prog section instead. But the more well known bands had to provide a single, and this was WYWH's. (although they got away with no single on Animals) It is a song about Syd, but it is also about the current state of the band. After the success of DSOTM, everyone went out and was enjoying their newfound wealth, and it was hard to get back into the studio and there was some tension. The song is really saying "wish you weren't here" to the other members. But that's only a deeper meaning for people who know the history of the band; really, it can be about anything you want it to, the lyrics are so vague.

SOYCD pt. 2--A beautiful closure to a beautiful album. Although I'm not a fan of the funky section, the eargasmic high guitar solo more than makes up for that. This song closes the album with a nice circle effect, since Waters did love his circles very much.

Overall, an essential buy for those who have a long musical attention span, enjoy a more mellow listen, (like most Floyd, this album does not rock very hard) and like space rock. (even though none of the lyrics have anything to do with space) Although if you are new to Floyd I would recommend DSOTM over this one; I can imagine that parts of this would be a bit overwhelming without any previous exposure.

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Send comments to Ghandi 2 (BETA) | Report this review (#81441)
Posted Sunday, June 18, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars a marvel of production..the proof that music is human but inspiration is divine... Pink Floyd at its best... who would have thought that after reaching the top with DSOTM, Floyd did actually jumped at the top of the next mountain, rather easily..

Shine On.. parts send shivers down my spine every time i listen to them (and the rest of my neighborhood).. Wish You Were Here is the absolut rock ballad... Welcome To The Machine is IMHO the most dramatic moment along with Hey You in the discography of Floyd..but still Floy is a rock band, so...let there be have a cigar...dynamite...

a perfect gem in all aspects...

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Send comments to toolis (BETA) | Report this review (#81565)
Posted Tuesday, June 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars "Shine On You..." is one of the best song of all time and "Wish You Were Here" is an amazing acoustic ballad. Even if the other tracks are a bit weaker, this is one of the best album released by the Floyd together with "Meddle", "Dark Side", "Animals" and "The Wall". A must-have.

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Send comments to crumble_soul (BETA) | Report this review (#81864)
Posted Saturday, June 24, 2006 | Review Permalink
2 stars After Dark side Of The Moon, Pink Floyd were in trouble. They simply HAD TO deliver, and yet it was nearly impossible to follow up their unequalled masterpiece. No wonder then that they failed, and quite miserably.

There's not one single song on this album that would reach the levels of the weakest song (difficult to name!) on DSOTM. If ever progressive rock earned the description "pretentious", it was here.

It is not that they wouldn't have tried. However, instead of trying to go forwards, they turned back to the past, and wallowed in the longing of their admittedly remarkable friend, Syd Barrett, and in the terrible pain of having become immensely rich.

The biggest problem to me is that the songs don't form a cohesive whole. WYWH tries to be a theme album, but fails again. On the positive side I have to say that they play strongly as a unit, but that is to be expected after almost a decade of training and gigging. In my opinion, WYWH is a stage that Pink Floyd just had to pass quickly to get over the success of DSOTM.

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Send comments to OT Räihälä (BETA) | Report this review (#82952)
Posted Thursday, July 06, 2006 | Review Permalink
2 stars Good sound. Good lyrics. Where's the music? Floyd can do much better than this.

The only progressive rock song on the album is "Shine On", parts 1 & 2. It is a good introduction to progressive rock. I give the two parts a 3 star ranking. The ending of part 2 however, is terrible. It goes into a 70s funky section, which starts out humourous enough, then gets silly. and boring. The album ends on a boring section as well, slow with a noodling synth. Yawn.

"Welcome to the machine" starts off with good energy, but halfway through , yawn. We get to experience pointless noodling on the synth for the ending. 2 star. I'm not sure this song should be considered prog.

"have a cigar" , not a prog song. Could have been a really good song, but the synthesizers in it ruin the piece. 2 star.

"wish you were here" , not prog again. A decent song. Good lyrics. 3 star.

And that is it. The album feels like it is missing two or three songs somewhere. I fail to see how this ranks as one of the best Floyd albums, let alone a prog album. It really bores me. It's lacking in energy. Floyd can do way better than this.

I can't give this 3 star, because three star is: Good, but non-essential The album is not good. 2 star: collectors and fans only.

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Send comments to capitalist (BETA) | Report this review (#83021)
Posted Friday, July 07, 2006 | Review Permalink
3 stars Frankly, I don't know what WYWH is doing in the top ten of the list. I had very high hopes for this album seeing how everyone claims it to be a masterpiece, but I was honestly dissapointed when I finally got to listen to it.

WYWH starts out with the first part of "Shine on you crazy diamond". This is a great song IMO but the sound is not neat like in DSOTM and it kills the whole feeling. Then we have Waters' "Welcome to the machine". Good song but it gets repetitive and it's just TOO long. "Have a cigar" is an average PF song, nothing special. You can actually still hear hints of "Welcome to the machine" in here. The title track is nothing but a simple, acoustic ballad by Gilmour and Waters, with a more radio-friendly feel to it which does nothing for me. Finally we get the 2nd part of SOYCD which is basically the 1st part with only a few variations throughout the end. Again the sound quality could have been a lot better (maybe they should have let Parsons do it again).

All in all, not a masterpiece in any sense but an OK album nonetheless. If you're still getting to know PF you'd do better with Animals or DSOFTM. Good, but not really essential.

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Send comments to Hans (BETA) | Report this review (#83446)
Posted Tuesday, July 11, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars I find this to be the best album Pink Floyd has ever recorded. I think Gilmour and Waters were more mature in their compositions than in The Dark Side of The Moon. It is also a much more emotional album tha any other records because it was dedicated to the recently deceased Syd Barret, who showed to the studio when the album was being recorded. This album takes you on a journey that doesn't end for about an hour after you listened to it, when I listen to it i keep thinking about it for a long time. It is the album I hear the most and the one I think reached perfection in combining the lyrics with the music and the emotions it transmits.

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Send comments to ndiego (BETA) | Report this review (#83674)
Posted Thursday, July 13, 2006 | Review Permalink
3 stars I try listening to Floyd, but I can't help getting bored with their music. Still, I found this album very good but I just don't see this as a masterpiece of progressive music as almost everybody at this site does. Is a very enjoyable and unique rock album, but the only really prog tracks here are Shine On You Crazy Diamond I & II, and part II isn't so unique, with much of the same as part I.

The rest of the tracks are all good but not really prog, plus, the lack of dinamic on the rhythmic section and the vocal style makes me get sleepy every time I listen to a Pink Floyd's album....

Sorry folks...

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Send comments to mistertorture (BETA) | Report this review (#83752)
Posted Friday, July 14, 2006 | Review Permalink
imoeng
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Wish You Were Here

Truly a masterpiece album, even though it was released more then 30 years ago. The greatness of this album also reflected by the high appreciation from the listeners, despite the experience with Pink Floyd's music. This really happens to me, considering I'm somewhat new to Pink Floyd. Actually, about 4 or 5 years ago, my dad introduced me to Pink Floyd, The Dark Side Of The Moon album. However, as a kid, I was not really into progressive rock, but now I can appreciate it much more than that.

It is somewhat hard for me to give a high rating for this album, because probably you would think that I give a high rating because of "the Pink Floyd's album" rather than "the album I like".

So, Wish You Were Here was released in 1975, and is Pink Floyd's ninth studio album (if I counted correctly :) ), just after another great album, Dark Side Of The Moon. At that time, the personnel of Pink Floyd were Roger Waters, David Gilmour, Nick Mason and Richard Wright. This album is considered as one of the best album in progressive rock world, and of course, among Pink Floyd's album. It is just amazing, that other progressive rock band, Marillion, which is hugely influenced by Pink Floyd, has an album called also Wish You Were Here with a same concept cover album with slightly difference.

Probably my two favorite tracks are Shine On You Crazy Diamond part 1 and Wish You Were Here. Shine On You Crazy Diamond is a really cool and nice song, with a sax sound in the end of the song, creating an even nicer element. I read on many articles, this song originally was a tribute to Syd Barrett (R.I.P). There is a story about the recording of this track. When they (Waters, Gilmour, Mason and Wright) recorded this track, Syd Barret came and sat very close to Gilmour. However, they didn't recognize him because he was very different, probably because of the drug addictions and the studio was full with tears. "Remember when you were young, you shone like the sun. Shine on you crazy diamond".

Welcome To The Machine is a "darker" song than Shine On You Crazy Diamond pt.1. The overall song is pretty monotone, like verse, chorus, solo, verse, chorus, sort of things. However, the solo parts are just "strange", but great, very progressive, well deserved 5 stars, especially the last solo.

Have A Cigar has the best guitar rhythm and solo among all other songs on the album. The rhythm is just groovy and very dynamic, along with the drum parts. One great thing is, the keyboard part often synchronized with guitar part, very good indeed. As a progressive metal listener, I would say that the guitar solo is not that "virtuoso", but techniques are not everything, as long as the feeling is great and fit the song. A truly amazing song.

Another great song, "How I wish, how I wish you were here.", The music is just very simple, compared to other songs on the album, an acoustic guitar, simple drum riffs and keyboard as a background sound. These simple things create a profound song, which has very deep feeling.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond pt.2 has more instrumental part, but with the same structure as the first part. The instrumental part in the end of the song is kinda divided into two; the first part is more jazzy and groovy with dynamics music. The second part is more "cool" and slow, a great way to end the album. Oh, one thing about the first instrumental part I told you, the bass riffs are just very cool, just great.

So, 5 stars is what this album deserved. Just like I said before, I'm somewhat new to older progressive rock, but then this album has made a hug impact on me that I start to love older prog as much as newer prog.

Keep On Proggin' In the Free World.

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Send comments to imoeng (BETA) | Report this review (#83799)
Posted Saturday, July 15, 2006 | Review Permalink
OpethGuitarist
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars My only complaint about this album is that I wish it were longer. It's such an awesome time for Floyd, and I want more from it. However, I wouldnt have wanted them to sacrifice quality for quantity.

This album has stood the test of time, and that's reason enough for it to be a masterpiece. However, let's look past the obvious factors and focus on the little things. The music is very simple, however, its the choice of notes and the placement that makes everything here so awesome. It's the volume swells and dips, the soundscapes that are created. The atmosphere is mysterious and uplifting at times, despite the sadder nature of the album.

The band's pinnacle release, and one of the most important in the history of music in general. A must have.

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Send comments to OpethGuitarist (BETA) | Report this review (#84232)
Posted Thursday, July 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars This 1975 Pink Floyd album is conclusively in my mind their Greatest Piece of work. It shows the perfect blend of the musicians and writing ability and contains classic songs like Wish You were Here, Shine on you crazy diamond, Have a Cigar, and Welcome to the Machine. Wait...that's the whole album! Unlike some Floyd albums, this album is not overly spacey or filled with long drones and sound effects. There are many, yes, but not to the extent of other pieces like Dark Side of the Moon.

I'm not doing to make this a long review. If anyone is reading this for a good reveiw, read no more. I am simply writing this to give my rating to a great album. If you are looking for an in-depth review, many people have great opinions in other reveiws. This album is a Masterpiece and I think every fan od Prog should have at least heard the album.

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Send comments to MajesterX (BETA) | Report this review (#85052)
Posted Friday, July 28, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Well, first of all, for me Pink Floyd is the best band ever, and WYWH is one of it's best albums. This album followed up the huge Dark Side of the Moon, and it was good cause Pink Floyd changed the rules in this album. The songs were entirely different from the ones which apeared at Dark Side, but they continued using some elements which are the trademarks of the floyd, an atmospherical guitar, lots of synthezisers, deep lyrics and weird sound effects. And they proved in this album that these elements are essential to their kind of music.

The album starts with the first part of the monstrous suite Shine On You Crazy Diamond. This is an fantastic song, with a long and calm introduction with wonderful guitars and keyboards, nice vocals and a terrific sax solo that closes the first part of the song. The album continuous with the innovative Welcome to the Machine. It's an innovative song, and it's really impressive, but I don't like it very much. It's too electronic for me. Have a Cigar changes the mood completely, as it is an very bluesy song. it's a great song with an wonderful guitar work and very good vocals (provided by Roy Harper, an guest star). The title song is next, and there isn't much to say about it, other than it's one of greatest hits of Floyd. The album comes to an end with the second part of Shine On You Crazy Diamond, which is basically instrumental, and it's much more darker than the first part. The whole thing come to an end just as it began, with an long and calm keyboard solo.

This album is perfect in every sense of the word, and even though I din't like Welcome to the Machine very much, I will give it a 5 star rating. Definetaly this album is a true prog masterpiece.

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Send comments to paixoxo (BETA) | Report this review (#86330)
Posted Wednesday, August 09, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars I'm glad to see that Wish You Were Here is getting a higher rating than Dark Side Of The Moon. Not because DSOTM isn't amazing beyond all reason, but because WYWH brought so much to the table. We're looking at a masterpiece here, from Rick Wright's haunting opening chord to his haunting closing chord. Not only does the album contain Pink Floyd's best instrumentals, but I find the lyrical subtleties to be surprisingly clever, e.g. Shine On You Crazy Diamond's slight changes from blown, to rode, to sail on the steel breeze. Rick Wright's keyboarding is absolutely phenomenal. As a keyboardist myself, I am still in awe about how much emotion he could get out of such an instrument. After many years, I still believe the most beautiful thing I've ever heard on a keyboard is the last two minutes of Shine On You Crazy Diamond Parts VI-IX. Wright never wowed anybody with skill. I think he has always possessed it, but finesse is his specialty, and no one does it better than he does.

Every song on this album is incredible. I'm trying not to say anything that hasn't already been said, but this is truly one of the greatest albums ever.

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Send comments to Momentary Lapse (BETA) | Report this review (#86949)
Posted Sunday, August 13, 2006 | Review Permalink
3 stars WYWH isn´t the best album in the PF history, and I think it doesn´t even reunite the merits to be in the "key album" charts for this band. I think that of the whole LP, the only song that really contributes to the band trascendence is Shine On You Crazy Diamond (both parts). Not even Wish You Were Here, that may be the most known of the songs of the band, but far away of the better one. I think that Dark Side of The Moon, Piper At The Gates of Dawn or Meddle for example, are far away better albums and more important albums that WYWH was: musicaly and in concept terms.

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Send comments to Jota_Quezada (BETA) | Report this review (#87319)
Posted Tuesday, August 15, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Where do you go, after you've just made one of the most popular albums of all time? There is a big chance, that people will just compare your effort to your previous achivement. It is certain that they will compare. Everyone would fail in face of this challenge... Everyone besides the Pink Floyd of course. Wish You Were Here is the highest rated Psychedelic/Space Rock album and the third highest rated album on this site. It deserves all the praise...

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 1): The song starts out with Wright using his synths to create a beautiful and mysterious atmosphere. And that is just what this song is: Beautiful and mysterious. Roger Waters sings surpisingly well for his standards. And you know what... This song contains Gilmours best guitar-work ever. And it's a perfect example of what Pink Floyd actually can do. It's the highlight of the album, but don't worry... It doesn't head down-hill from here. 5/5

Welcome to the Machine: The previous song fades out, and in come these strange sound effects that really make you believe you're in a machine. Then comes the acoustic guitar and Gilmour's high-pitched voice: "Welcome my son. Welcome to the machine". This song doesn't consist drums, since it relies heavily on ambient atmospheres. 3.5/5

Have A Cigar: This is a song that I can relate to. Nice rockable tune sung by the guest-apperance of Roy Harper. Waters was to originally sing this song, but he wrecked his voice recording Shine On... The song suddenly goes mono, and I suppose you hear it from a radio. You hear a guy changing the frequency to find the next song. 4/5

Wish You Were Here: A heartbreaking tune. One of the Floyd mainstream-classics alongside Money and Comfortably Numb. Lovely vocals by Gilmour and very nice lyrics. 5/5

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 2): Th continuation of the first shine on... This is just as good as the first one, perhaps even better, due to the jazz part at the end. 5/5

Overall a concept masterpiece. And one of the best albums in prog history. Any so-called progger, that doesn't have this album, can't be called a progger at all.

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Send comments to Kleynan (BETA) | Report this review (#87738)
Posted Sunday, August 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
rogerthat
COLLABORATOR
Crossover Team
4 stars I think a lot has already been said about Wish you were here and a lot of it superlative. Yeah, this is probably one of the few Floyd albums that has a blemishless image. Meddle is condemned for the inclusion of Seamus in the album. Dark Side is considered to be overproduced, apparently hiding a lack of real virtuoisty. Animals is criticized for being too bleak and The Wall is so obsessed with the grand concept, that... duh... where's the music, Roger? But music lovers have only glowing tributes to offer for WYWH. Really, is it that much better than the rest of the band's 70s work? Hmmmm.... I don't think there's any need to analyse the songs any further. So much has been said about them already. Here's my opinion on the album. This is not exactly what I expect from Pink Floyd. The lyrical content, particularly of Shine On, brings them more to the level of other rock bands out there. Most people like WYWH precisely because of the immensely personal emotions boiling over in Shine On I & II and the title cut. That's precisely the problem for me. No doubt the songs are well-written, but it's all too personalised, focussing over and over on Barret. The premise of DSOTM and Animals is much wider, covering life and humanity as a whole. Where WYWH approaches the broader outlook of those albums is in Welcome to the machine and Have a cigar. They have the requisite bite and Watersian irony that I look forward to. Especially considering Waters's later lyrical work, he doesn't, to my ears, sound too convincing delivering a mournful tribute to ex-band member and beacon Barret. It just gets a little too cheesy in the end. The only thing that saves the Shine On epic(s) is the wonderful solos by Gilmour and Wright, and of course, Dick Parry on the saxophone. Particularly, in Shine On-II, Wright has a whale of a time. But, then, if you've already heard the shining masterpiece from Meddle - Echos - this isn't exactly that exciting. In the final analysis, WYWH lacks the brilliant combination of variety and uniformity so finely crafted in DSOTM. It also lacks the moody intensity of Animals or The Wall. As for Piper at the gates..., its appeal is too far removed from the 70s Floyd work to be discussed with them. If this is the first Floyd album you'll buy, this is the ideal one for you, unless you already have exalted expectations from the band. This is not likely to evoke sharply divided reactions from fans and critics alike, and so it hasn't, because this is a mellow and mature Floyd, with their stomachs full and Waters not yet filling entire albums with his gloomy worldview. But if I would have to point out one album with which Floyd set the world on fire, this would most certainly not be the one.

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Send comments to rogerthat (BETA) | Report this review (#88827)
Posted Sunday, September 03, 2006 | Review Permalink
psychospaces@
5 stars Pink Floyd started out under the direction of a man named Syd Barrett. Unfortunately, soon after the band's first album ("Piper at the Gates of Dawn") came out, Syd started heavily experimenting with drugs. As he became more and more unstable, the rest of the group was forced to let him go so that he could seek the mental help that he desperately needed. Soon afterward the band's bassist, Roger Waters, took over. Roger followed in the similiar vein of long, meaningful songs; but inserted a bit more energy and occasionally a few extremely cynical commentaries. After the commercial success of Dark Side, Pink Floyd as a group became wary of moulding into the shape of the 5 minute singles band that Dark Side seemed to suggest. So, for their next outing Roger decided that he would take Floyd back to their roots, and subsequentely wrote "Wish You Were Here", an ode to the band's original frontman Syd.

Shine on you crazy diamond, without place to doubts is a representative song of the band, when we listen their name, immediately arrives us at the mind a powerful wow, a "what a beautiful song", because really is it, as much lyricist as musically and emotionally, here we find us with a lot of changes of humor but at the same time all they are yunited, we find a perfect sound,a perfect harmony, a mellancolic sound, silent that little to it goes enlarging, we find the necessary elements to pass over10 minutes of beautiful sound and beautiful music. one of the floyd´s characteristic is the sound of the sax, Dick Parry has a great sound, when the his music entry in the middle of the song is really marvelous, a different style gives him and an beautiful atmospere.

Welcome to the macihine (you can find it here in mp3), is for me the less significant and less pretty of the album, the start transports us immediately to think about some machine to which we are entering, and during all the song has a peculiar sound that maintains us listening it to the end.

Have a cigar, song that by unique and rare occasion is sung for a not member of the band, thing that does it very special still, but is a voice that remains him very well, and maybe with another voice not serious the same thing, is a song very complex musically speaking, the bass and the atmosphere are awesome.

Wish you were here, all a symbol, the sentimental side of the band, probably along with another brick in the wall part 2, is the only song of pink floyd that an ordinary person knows, really is not the complex song and well carried out, but if is a beauty, who not this hymn is known, who does not sing it, obviously dedicated too to Syd Barrett, an excellent song, in fact, just where should go, in the track 4.

Closing the album we found the continuation of the opening song and with the same name, shine on you crazy diamond, second part, maybe the darkest of the two, the less recognized but similarly beautiful, with the same escene, and the same depth of the first part, what a better way of finishing a masterpiece, that with a masterpiece. Without anymore to say, only that who doesnt has listened never this albm, run and do it.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#89891)
Posted Sunday, September 17, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars When it comes to an album that has been reviewed as much as this one has, it is rather useless to try to say something original. It will suffice to say that I agree with all of the people who have given this album 5 stars hitherto. Easily in my Top 3, or so, favorite albums of all time. To reiterate succintly: it is a brilliant piece of work that represents the height of Pink Floyd's career. Shine On You Crazy Diamond is an unbelievable peice which sports David Gilmour at his absolute finest. Welcome to the Machine is one of the most original and interesting songs I've ever heard. Lyrics are spectacular. Perfect in every aspect. Etc. Even the photography in the booklet is great. A must-have if ever there was one.

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Send comments to Nowhere Man (BETA) | Report this review (#93394)
Posted Wednesday, October 04, 2006 | Review Permalink
3 stars Wish you Were Here is the only song I can sing. Really. It's one of those songs that stay with you, that mean something. It has very touching lyrics, and a memorable acoustic guitar line. But it's not the album's only good moment: The Shine On sections are beautiful, moving, and exhilarating fun rockers all at once. The other tracks are not nearly as amazing as the three mentioned above, they don't connect to the spirit (with the exception of Welcome to the Machine at points).

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Send comments to Shakespeare (BETA) | Report this review (#93638)
Posted Friday, October 06, 2006 | Review Permalink
superready2@h
5 stars Wish You Were Here-a tribute to Roger (Syd) Keith Barett. After "Dark side.." was released is when the band began to become undone...though there are very little signs of it. This was a very hard act, the follow up to a revolution. How do you do that? They did. It begins with Shine on You crazy diamond, and the special (and bizarre) thing about this track is that Syd after having no contact with the band for about seven years showed up! at the recording to that particular track! Richard Wright said:" He was bald fat and jumping up and down brushing his teeth" Welcome to the machine is good.. kind of overlong still good. "Have a cigar " (sung by Roy Harper) is also good, but the song by the same name of the album Wish you Were Here is the best song of the album and goes right up with the greatest Floyd songs..(money, another brick in the wall (pt2)comfortably numb.. etc) then shine on part 2...this is also one of there best and isn't ever matched musically again.5 out of 5

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#94542)
Posted Saturday, October 14, 2006 | Review Permalink
DanielUsher2@
5 stars Pink Floyds 'Wish You Were Here' is in my opinion a great progressive rock album and definately a better effort then the slightly overrated 'Dark Side of The Moon'.

There is something for every floyd fan on this album from the epic outstanding Shine on you crazy diamond of which the fantastic partnership of Wright Gilmour and Waters is in full flow and at its creative peak.

The moving combination of Gilmours bluesy guitar and Wrights soothing keyboard would make this track great to listen to even without any vocals. However with Waters fantastic lyrics included it makes this track a masterpiece.

For any major Roger Waters fans you have 'Welcome to The Machine' which is a typical Roger Waters rant on musical commercialism and more importantly 'Have a Cigar' which is another Waters attack on record producers and the greed they process.

The title track 'Wish You Were Here' is a feast for any Gilmour fan. Both Gilmours vocals and acoustic guitar are more emotional and moving then anything Roger Waters tried to say on 'The Wall' or 'The Final Cut' and is a great tribute song to Syd Barrett. Unlike Waters Gilmour didn't have to shout down the microphone to get his feelings across to listeners.

This is the best work that the floyd would do as a unit before Waters decided to take over the band and destroy the essence of what made Pink Floyd so brilliant. They went on to make some good albums after Wish You Were Here but they never scaled these heights again.

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#95571)
Posted Tuesday, October 24, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Well I tink "Wish you were here" is the BEST Pink Floyd's album and even I could say one of the best rock work in the history. "Shine On you Crazy Diamond" is simply fantastic, excellent, majestic, grandiose. The best of Pink Floyd. Then "Welcome to The Machine", a great theme but -in my opinion- the worst in the album (even so it's very good). In "Have a Cigar" I love Roy Harper's voice, the "personal personality" that he "puts" in this theme. "Wish you were here" is a great acoustic masterpiece, laconic and emotional. And eventually the other part of "Shine On..." is also unbeatable. - The best: "Shine on you crazy diamond (parts I-IX)" - Something improvable: the division of Shine On, or maybe "Welcome to the Machine" (too much synths). - The worst: anything.

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Send comments to komun (BETA) | Report this review (#95574)
Posted Tuesday, October 24, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Define greatness?

In my view the fact that I bought the vinyl of this album on the day it was released and still listen to it now some 31 years later when as a 47 year old Chartered Accountant you think I would know better!

Absolutely suberb

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Send comments to rabs (BETA) | Report this review (#98120)
Posted Friday, November 10, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars What a glorious album, featuring THE best prog rock track, and I am sure everyone would agree.. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", then you get "Welcome To The Machine", "Have A Cigar" (Bravo Sir Harper!!) and "Wish You Were Here" followed by the other parts of the classic "Shine On You Crazy Diamond"

I know there are folk out there who have not heard this album, and I have to say, what you been doing?? get to the record shop straight away and purchase it!

Its gone down in prog folklore that whilst "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" was being recorded, Syd Barrett came into the studio.. and we all know who the track was all about.

Roger Waters has to be praised for writing perfect lyrics about a dear friend that he loved so much, it is one song that will certainly cause your emotions to rocket.

Brilliant stuff!

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Send comments to Frippertron (BETA) | Report this review (#99718)
Posted Monday, November 20, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd's "Wish You Were Here" is as close to absolute musical perfection as an album can get. Never before has an album supplied such a euphoric atmosphere.

Shine on You Crazy Diamond (Part 1) Probably the best song on the album, although choosing can be incredibly difficult. This is the apotheosis of cosmic space rock. It is a testament to the then facilitated Syd Barrett, and there will never be a song as sentimentally beautiful as this.

Welcome to the Machine One of Pink Floyd's all time darkest moments, the band attacks the music industry that apperantly drove Floyd's original mastermind Syd to the gates of dawn. A very powerful and touching song.

Have A Cigar Seldom is the low point of an album of this caliber. Roy Harper delivers an outstanding vocal performance as the heartless producer that stereotypes accurately the agents behind the stars.

Wish You Were Here A true Floyd Classic. Enough said.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 2) A continuation of the first song on WYWH, Part 2 is the perfect closer for the perfect album.

Wish You Were Here is everything that progressive music should be.

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Send comments to Endless River (BETA) | Report this review (#100893)
Posted Wednesday, November 29, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here, being the epitome of Pink Floyd and Psychedelic Rock as a whole deserves nothing less than 5. Shine on You Crazy Diamond Part 1 and 2, obviously great songs but even they do not amount to whatis contained in the middle of this album. Genius. Great musicianship and vocals and lyrics.

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Send comments to rekabat (BETA) | Report this review (#101357)
Posted Friday, December 01, 2006 | Review Permalink
FloydFree@hot
5 stars There's not a lot I can say that you won't have read in almost every other review. This album is a complete and utter masterpiece, from start to finish, and is easily my favourite of Floyd's releases.

Every track is superb, from the spacey and atmospheric 'Shine On' suite, to the amazingly beautiful acoustic title track, which is my favourite of the five tracks present.

If you're a Floyd fan, a prog fan, or just a fan of good music, you need to have this in your collection. It is one hundred percent essential!

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Send comments to (BETA) | Report this review (#102838)
Posted Tuesday, December 12, 2006 | Review Permalink
3 stars One of Pink Floyd's most well known albums, usually considered a masterpiece.

The two epics, shine on you crazy diamond 1 and 2 have some good moments, but are too filled with filling material. The title track is usually praised, but with the acoustic guitars and the good lyrics it's not much more than a good pop song to me. Have a cigar and welcome to the machine are ok tracks, that don't really impress me, but aren't bad either.

3 stars for this one

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Send comments to Autoband (BETA) | Report this review (#103288)
Posted Friday, December 15, 2006 | Review Permalink
4 stars Almost Everything on this album is so 70s. Right from the sleeve cover , especially the sticker, to the Moog synths. Of course it's the best the 70s have to offer and, imho, dated thing are more interesting than timeless things.

I can't remember the first time I heard this but I remember that I started liking the title track about two years ago. Nowadays I'm more keen oof the epic "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", especially part 1. This song is the definite Space Rock statement, a masterpiece of creating atmosphere in music. On the contrary, I'm not that fond of "Welcome To The Machine" and I'm quite neutral to "Have A Cigar".

Overall a very good album though, in fact Pink Floyds best.

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Send comments to Frasse (BETA) | Report this review (#104281)
Posted Saturday, December 23, 2006 | Review Permalink
5 stars Truly the single greatest album that I own. From the agonizing beauty of Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part 1 (The first letter of every other word in the title spells SYD, the name of Pink Floyd's first singer, for those of you who don't know) to the dark, despairing Welcome to the Machine, the pure psychedelic rock of Have A Cigar, the beauty of the reminiscent Wish You Were Here, and finally the album comes to a close with a feeling of completion with Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part 2.

If you haven't heard this album yet, go out and buy it immediately. It is truly the greatest album that I have ever heard. Pink Floyd came to their creative height in 1975, and they certainly proved to the world what they could do and what music could be.

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Send comments to GilmourruomliG (BETA) | Report this review (#105610)
Posted Thursday, January 04, 2007 | Review Permalink
evenless
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Almost everything has already been said and written about this album, so I'll keep it brief. This is probably one of the most influential albums in progressive music ever and it is my personal favourite Pink Floyd album together with "Dark Side Of The Moon". It's difficult to argue which one of those two albums is better, if there is one?

After the 1973 release DSOTM everybody was afraid that PINK FLOYD would never be able to top this album. With the 1975 album "WHISH YOU WERE HERE" they have proven us wrong! Luckily they were not trying to make "DSOTM 2", but rather they took a quite different approach with the delicate lengthy epic tracks "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" about their previous band member SYD BARRETT. The initials of the words "Shine", "You" & "Diamond" stand for SYD. And obviously "Whish You Were Here" goes out to SYD as well.

Once again; I cannot possibly chose one favourite between DSOTM and WYWH. Therefore I give them both 5 firm stars. A masterpiece of progressive music!

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Send comments to evenless (BETA) | Report this review (#107389)
Posted Saturday, January 13, 2007 | Review Permalink
Joolz
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars Many Prog lovers favourite Floyd album, and I agree it is music of a very high quality, but for me it is just a touch too laid back, too polished and 'perfect'. Certainly, the sprawling homage to Syd - Shine On You Crazy Diamond - is an amazing creation and an all time classic [though not actually a personal favourite], and Wish You Were Here is a perennial crowd pleaser, but I need something with a little more guts and bite to really set me off. The musicanship here is stunning, Gilmour's acoustic phrasing on the title track especially showing an amazing attention to detail. Overall, this album has a similar mellowness akin to the much later Division Bell, and mellow doesn't sustain me quite enough over a whole album. Brilliant stuff but they did better.

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Send comments to Joolz (BETA) | Report this review (#107974)
Posted Friday, January 19, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Although "Dark Side of the Moon" might have become more iconic, "Wish You Were Here" to me is the peak of Pink Floyd's achievement. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", in particular, sums up all the qualities that made me a hardcore Floyd fan for years. I first heard it on the Saturday night rock show on Radio 1, wondering what on earth was that bluesy guitar solo floating through the air, over a dreamy wash of synth. Then there were those four notes, resounding into silence, and the four notes again. It was David Gilmour of course, and the whole band's playing is spaced and timed to perfection. The song itself, when it eventually arrives, is a powerful and deserving tribute to their original lead singer Syd Barrett, filled with nostalgia for the times before his mind disintegrated. After the song, as if it couldn't get any more perfect, it finishes with not one, but two exquisite sax solos over a glittering layer of guitar arpeggios.

The central songs are filled with cynicism. Embittered with the ways of the soulless, money-obsessed music industry, Roger Waters comes up with some distinctively acerbic lyrics. On "Welcome to the Machine", Rick Wright's keyboards create a sinister industrial throb, insistent and creepy. "Have a Cigar" is a great example of Floyd's funky blues-rock style, propelled by wah-wah organ. After the bitter ranting of the previous two songs, the beautiful ballad "Wish You Were Here" is a reflective comedown. This must be the most suitable Floyd song for one man with a guitar to sing and strum along to, simple and wistful.

The most often overlooked part of this album is the second half of "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". This is not just a reprise, but a fully fleshed out piece. Starting with an impressive build up of tension that recalls their earlier masterpiece "Echoes", with the whole band putting everything into it. This blends smoothly into one last verse of the song, this rousing final tribute followed with some funky jamming and plenty of keyboard whizzes from Wright.

There's a sad tale associated with the recording sessions for "Wish You Were Here". The band and their hangers-on wondered who the dishevelled stranger was sitting in the corner of the reception. He turned out to be the very subject of the song they were recording, who they had not seen for years - Syd himself had briefly come out of seclusion to pay them a visit.

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Send comments to Open-Mind (BETA) | Report this review (#108025)
Posted Friday, January 19, 2007 | Review Permalink
ZowieZiggy
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars After such a masterpiece in rock history, such a commercial success (over 40 millions albums sold so far - 2006), no one could believe that the Floyd could supersede DSOTM. I did not quite know what I was going to discover with WYWH.

So far the Floyd had produced quite a lot of average to good albums with terrible moments : "Ummagumma" studio album, "AHM" 's second side and "Meddle" 's first one.

At that time (in 1975 - no Internet) I had not the luxury of some later fans that could discover this album long time after its release, having read so many reviews and then make their choice to purchase the album. I really had no clue about what I was going to discover. So, here we go.

"Shine on You Crazy Diamond" : first of all, it refers, again, about craziness (after "Brain Damage" on DSOTM) and is an ode to Syd. He will attend some studio sessions while the Floyd were recording this track. Dave asked "Who is this guy ?" to one of the band personnel. He had not recognize Syd, although they were friends from school time ! (none of the band did so, thinking that this person was an undertaker). The track "Wish You Were Here" is dedicated to him. It is very much inspired by him and his great influence on the band.

"Shine on You" is split into two on the album due to the lack of space (although I'm a bit sceptic about that : second side of "Selling England", for instance, reaches more than 28 minutes, so this track could have fit onto one side perfectly. Anyway when I listen to it now, I put both tracks one after the other and listen to the whole piece as being one. During some concerts of that era (prior to the release of the album), only available on bootlegs like "Cruel But Fair " in L.A. and "Black Holes In The Sky" at Wembley, they will perform the whole track in a row. This is how I prefer it.

It is one of very best Floyd song ever written. A fantastic spacey intro, great guitar and superb key moments. A LOT of feeling (remember it refers to Syd : "You were caught in the crossfire of childhood and stardom, blown on the steel breeze").

A magical moment. I will probably ask to have this one be played on my burial ceremony (but I'm not in a hurry, the later the better). A personal detail : I used to play a CD when I go to sleep / wake up and usually change frequently (every week or so). For more than a month now, I play "Shine" part I to V at night, and wake up with Part VI to IX. What a glorious way to start / finish a day.

"Welcome to the Machine" is another fabulous Floyd song. Not commercial like "Money" of course and absent from any Floyd compil : this might be a proof of excellence though. Heaven is at hand (I would be inspired to also get that one for my burial party) !

At this time of review (December 3rd, 2006), I will go and attend a concert from one of the most fantastic Floyd cover band I know : "The Machine". On this tour tour they will play the whole of "The Wall" and "Wish You Were Here". I expect a gorgeous evening. I'll tell you more after the concert.

...Since I post this review after editing it more than six weeks after, I can tell you that it was quite an emotional moment for me to have this wonderful album rendered live again. Some might argue about cover bands but when they reach such level of quality I can only say "Bravo" (which I did by the way).

"Have a Cigar" is alo a very good track. A famous line of the song, but maybe this fact is not known by everbody (althoug it is true), says : "Which One Is Pink" ? and refers to an American record executive having the band in front of him and asking this stupid question.

The title track was the one with which the whole album started.

Dave will say : "The whole thing started out of that first guitar thing, that "ding -ding- ding-ding." I was just in the studio rehearsal room during one day and playing with the guitar and those notes started coming out, just a little motif on the guitar. I played it a few times, and I put some DDL's and other effects on it and started playing again and it sort of pinged out and sounded nice and I said "oh, that's really great." Roger really got off on it, he got exactly the same from it as I was getting from it. I don't know quite how it happened, but those sort of things happen. That was like the start of, gave us the start for making the whole record."

To me the reference to Syd is obvious, but I did not find a confirmation for this, so maybe I am imagining ... It is a very pathetic song, full of tenderness and emotion.

So : "What have we found ? The same old fears, wish you were here" !

In Britain, the album hit number one in its second week on the charts. EMI could not supply the unprecedented demand. Even with its pressing plants working overtime, the company had to inform retailers that only fifty percent of each order could be filled. At the time, "Wish You Were Here" was the fastest-selling of all Pink Floyd albums, topping record charts the world over.

The "supporting" tour which finsihed BEFORE the album release, was an absolute success. In The US, within hours, all of the dates were sold out, breaking all records. Concerts at the L.A. Sports Arena, sold all of the 67,000 tickets (four concerts) in a single day. An additional show sold out within hours.

Five stars of course and the absolutely all time best album of the Floyd IMO. Not a single poor nor average track. Unprecedended (even DSOTM got his "On The Run" one).

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Send comments to ZowieZiggy (BETA) | Report this review (#108259)
Posted Sunday, January 21, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars THE MOON KEEPS ON SHINING

After all the success that their previous release "The Dark Side Of The Moon", Pink Floyd keeps on doing some great music without taking car of what it takes. For me, this is their best album, and making it as a tribute for his moral leader and friend Syd Barrett. "Wish You Were Here" arrives in the climatic point of Pink Floyd's career. The relationship between them is stronger than ever, and this great work is really a reflection of it. The conjunction of each band member and the musical maturity achieved in almost ten years of experience in that time makes of this album one of the quintessential in Progressive Rock History and also makes the consolidation of them as an emblematic band following their ascension since David Gilmour joined the band.

The album starts with one their masterpieces "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", which is subdivided in two parts in a very conceptual way, the moody beginning of the majestic keyboards by Rick Wright joined to the most unforgettable solo by David Gilmour turns this album to a magical musical experience. This complete odd to Syd Barrett reaches the heaven in the chorus when different voices mix to scream: SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND. The sweet voice of Gilmour adds the perfect touch to rest over the highest cloud of the kingdom of calm.

The sound of machines and pistons ascending and descending are interrupted by the magical acoustic guitar that begins "Welcome to the Machine" is a glorious moment to keep on that cloud. A vintage keyboard in a very mechanical way continues the perfect rhythm of the song finished with the violins arrangements in a very violent way. A door is shut, now you're awake.

Once you have waked up from your mental sleep, "Have a Cigar" takes the call and keeps you awake, now it's time to shake your head with the tight rhythm on the song. Like a railroad, the song goes in a slow and heavy way to find the peace once again. The keyboards act like a weapon to take the obstacles off the way.

Now it's time for "Wish You Were Here" the song that gives name to the album couldn't be more simple and perfect at the same time, a very melodic ballad that is dedicated to Syd Barrett, the feelings of the band member have for their now extinct friend are so deep that only he could have inspired this memorable and beautiful song. The scat that David Gilmour adds to the song excites you to tears. This is definitely one of the most sentimental songs in History.

The return of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" in its second part with the keyboard solo seals this magnificent work. In my opinion this is the best album of all times. God Bless Pink Floyd forever and ever.

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Send comments to MadcapLaughs84 (BETA) | Report this review (#109269)
Posted Sunday, January 28, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars My favorite album in the whole wide world!

Sorry, i tend to get a little giddy when it comes to Wish You Were Here, but it's just so good! Shine On You Crazy Diamond is THE Pink Floyd song, and the three other tracks are so well executed. The production contributes to the flow of the album without monopolizing it, and the combination of Wright's soothing keyboards and Gilmour's emotional guitar playing makes this an experience you will never forget.

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Send comments to 12345666 (BETA) | Report this review (#110941)
Posted Wednesday, February 07, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars This album is simply a progressive masterpiece. I'm using the term prog, not only because that's the style that you will find in this album, but because this album has the quality that every prog work should have: I'm referring to the visionary mood (as I call it). In other words the capability to take you somewhere, expecially "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". This album is not a simple list of songs, it's an experience. WYWH was my first Floyd album, and when I listened to it, under suggestion from my father who knew it very well, it really blew my mind away. The album is simply perfect, the songs, the moods, the lyrics, even the MARVELLOUS, AMAZING, surreal packaging by Storm Thorgerson reflects prefectly the main argument of the work: the absence. The modern man absence, their absence as a band, the absence of inspiration and will to make music after the huge success of DSOTM, Syd's absence. I think that talking about the songs or criticize them, would only be a waste of time, so much has been written about them, anyway, the only suggestion I can make is to go and get the album if you still don't have it, even if you don't know Floyd yet, this is the best way to start knowning the band. 5 stars to one of the finest moments ever in modern music.

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Send comments to Malve87 (BETA) | Report this review (#111545)
Posted Saturday, February 10, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars A round disc initiates with a suite dedicated to Crazy Diamante known by all like Syd BARRETT, it even says that the same Syd went to the recording studio when the band gave I touch end to the disc, this disc sounds very space but different from the works "Atom Heart Mother" and "Meddle", because WRIGHT becomes somewhat synthetic by the handling shining of Richard, again we see the final work of a band who exploded of creativity and a supreme interpretation, a disc that a melancholy contains a level of state of maquina without feelings, the yearning of the presence of a person, the sample of which without one has become conceited, clearly this it is a disc dedicated to BARRETT, in which they engrandecen of the form that they know to the person who beginning a dream, but like there am saying, to have continued BARRETT in control of the serious band of a very select taste that practically serious stranger by the rest of the world, without however is the band that has made that many people know the way towards the world líricas sensations, musical and magical that creates the progressive one, this disc contains great subjects, nothing can be attributed to him since the joint is very good, with part one of oda is BARRETT continuing with subjects that equal move I have equal please to finish with oda in an essential aim, simply very good work.

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Send comments to Shelket (BETA) | Report this review (#111568)
Posted Saturday, February 10, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars From start to finish, your mind will be taken to another level. The epic 'Shine on you crazy diamond' is just great. A very intense listening moment. Welcome to the machine is a very haunting song and very futuresque, it reminds me of a Philip K. Dick novel. But my favorite song has to be 'wish you were here', great lyrics, great music, probably the saddest Floyd song. The album is dedicated to Syd Barret, and what a lovely ode it is. It's my favorite Pink Floyd album.

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Send comments to trauma0 (BETA) | Report this review (#111931)
Posted Monday, February 12, 2007 | Review Permalink
Chris H
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars More surrealistic than a Claude Monet acid trip, this cover just absolutely amazed me. The idea of mixings two different concepts, fire and life (the human) made for such an interesting contrast that this turned out to be one of the greatest album covers to grace the world. Enough about the cover though, there is actually music to talk about here.

Side 1 starts off with the Floyd song virtually everybody and their brother knows about, "Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Parts I-V". This is everybody at Pink Floyd headquarters' big tribute song to their fallen (only mentally at the time) original guitarist, madman genius Syd Barrett. Each instrument only goes for as long as the human ears allow it go for here, and because of this everything stays fresh and interesting. Just as you think Gilmour's soft tones might bore you, he either kicks it up a notch or Roger Waters will bring some new bass beats into the equation to spice it up and keep the listener interested. The lyrics here? Oh man don't even get me started. They are an absolute touch of mastery, some of the greatest stuff ever to be put on paper. "Welcome To The Machine" is the often much overlooked second A-side song, and I really feel that it does not get the recognition it deserves. Most people just brush it off as "The song that comes after Shine On", but it really is a complex and mysterious piece in itself. A deep and dark mixture of "Dark Side" inspired psychedelia full of twisted lyrics and noise effects, this is not a song you can miss.

Side 2 is considerably weaker, in my opinion. However, considerably weaker means nothing because this is still a stand-out album. "Have a Cigar" is really breaks the trippy, psychedelic flow that they had going through the A-side. Roy Harper sings this tale about the dysfunctional record industry, and it is a much more straight-forward rock n' roll song which doesn't really blend with the atmosphere they have worked so hard to create up to this point. The one thing I do like, however, is the fade out of "Have a Cigar" into the radio opening of "Wish You Were Here". "Wish You Were Here" is a really simple piece of music, but it is touching and heartbreaking at the same time. One of the first songs I ever played on guitar, this song will stay with me forever not only in that view, but because it such an excellent song considering lyrics and musicianship. The second half of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond", which is parts VI-IX, acts as the outro/closer to the album. Not quite as good as the first half of the suite, this one lacks the energy and passion that the first half used so strongly. I wouldn't mind seeing them switch positions on the album, as this would be a better opener than closer.

One of the first experimental concept albums I have ever come across that doesn't have any random instrumentation or "noodling". The synths are on fire here, and Gilmour shines on Waters' lyrics. A true 5 star album right here, this completely eclipses "Dark Side of the Moon".

Shine on Syd, Shine on.

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Send comments to Chris H (BETA) | Report this review (#112743)
Posted Monday, February 19, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars There's not a great deal I could say about Pink Floyd's 1975 album that hasn't already been said. But obviously, you know, I'll try and stuff. (This is why I normally write about bands like Subterranean Masquerade, whom you've never heard of).

The sequel to the phenomenally popular 'Dark Side of the Moon' was always going to be a huge seller based on legacy alone, which is a shame as this inevitably led to the band adopting a more radio-friendly and commercial sound forever after. The crazy kids whose boundless musical (and, I suppose, substance) experimentation produced such inspired 20-minute classics as 'Echoes' and such ridiculous 20-minute embarrassments as 'Atom Heart Mother' in equal measure, were now making albums targeted at the mass international audience they had snared. The band's early discography is packed with incredible highs and lows, and though much of it is inherently rubbish, the audacity alone makes it enjoyable. Now a sensation thanks to the single 'Money' (I won't bother pointing out the irony. Oh, whoops), the band were locked on board the gravy train, and the only way to de-rail it would be through an exhausting process of relentless alienation. This was almost accomplished before the 'Household Objects' project was scrapped, which would have seen the band producing an entire album by playing household appliances and things as instruments. They wisely chose to just continue being good, though it would have been interesting to hear a toilet solo.

'Wish You Were Here' was the not-too-long-awaited next album, and is easily the band's most blatantly commercial effort so far. This doesn't come at a cost to artistic integrity, and indeed it's difficult to consider an album book-ended by two incredibly long halves of a nine-part suite as a 'sell-out' record, but by this point Pink Floyd knew how to make popular music, and how to present it to the public. The album's production job is polished to the point that Rick Wright's keyboards and David Gilmour's melodic guitars, both the highlights of the album, seem almost to slip off the edge of the CD as each track fades into the next. The innovative samples famously incorporated into 'Dark Side of the Moon' are even more prominent here, and are arguably unnecessary in bridging these afore-mentioned gaps. The throbbing machine at the opening of track two is perfect, but the fuzzy crowd noise at the end, and the long wind that segues between the title track and the final song, seem more like deliberate attempts to make this all one piece of music in the way 'Dark Side' almost was. Gilmour and Roger Waters take turns at the microphone, and there's even time for a nice, short acoustic song for people who don't really like Pink Floyd. Add Storm Thorgerson's cool photographic album sleeve and this becomes the archetypal album of Pink Floyd hereafter, the template Gilmour would fall back to after escaping from Waters' domination in the late 80s.

'Shine on You Crazy Diamond' is one of Pink Floyd's most famous songs, and I might as well say one of their best. The last great long song they would ever record, and probably only the second great long song after 'Echoes,' this nine-part suite is split in two and shoved to alternate ends of the record. It would make more sense as a complete song, but the interference of major record labels saw that this wasn't allowed to happen. Who wants to buy a four-song album that takes half an hour to get going? The first half of fifteen minutes or so is the best, as the second half is largely a reprise aside from some great bass and guitar solos. Beginning in grand minimalist style with Wright's booming and hypnotically slow spacey keyboards, Gilmour's famous four-note melody creeps in, soon to be accompanied by drums and a whole load of other loud sounds. Waters' vocals follow the trademark 'whispered' style of singing, but the chorus is bombastic and energetic. Some peoples' attention spans will be too short to appreciate this song in its entirety, so it's probably fortunate that it's divided this way.

The middle of the album is notoriously weak in comparison to the incredible opening and closing pieces, but what we're given is still highly enjoyable and a little diverse, at least in terms of which instrument is being favoured. 'Welcome to the Machine' is an ambiguous anthem of conformity that makes great use of faux-acoustic guitar over the hubbub of noises, but it's nothing too exciting. 'Have a Cigar' is more upbeat and satirical and a chance for Wright's keyboards to shine, even if that mostly means playing a prominent and potentially irritating riff between the verses. The vocals, criticising the music industry, are weirdly handled by Roy Harper, as Waters apparently had a cold and Gilmour wasn't prepared to groan the hateful lyrics. This was probably the right decision, as his later attempts to handle such issues on 'A Momentary Lapse of Reason' were really terrible and unconvincing; he's just not a nasty man. Following some phony radio transmission, presumably from an irritated listener who just couldn't handle the satire of the last track, a tinny acoustic guitar is heard. The penultimate song sticks out from the synth-washed atmosphere and is the acoustic title track, 'Wish You Were Here.' With some nice lyrics and a catchy melody, this has remained a live favourite, but sounds a little out of place so far into this recording, a void escaping Wright's Rick-Wakemen-esque domination of the airwaves elsewhere.

Another great Pink Floyd album, produced by a band with a different aura. Waters would take full creative control after this release, leading to the less impressive 'Animals' and the pop-rock-opera 'The Wall' that's actually really good, whiney as it is. If Pink Floyd under Gilmour ever release another album, which is incredibly unlikely but not impossible, 'Wish You Were Here' will be their main reference point to make it 'sound like Pink Floyd,' just as they did for the last release 'Division Bell' thirteen years ago. The majority of this album, excluding tracks two and three, will continue to form part of any future live setlist, and the other two make quite a nice pair, their morals not being mutually exclusive. Wright recalls this album as one of the only Pink Floyd records he can listen to for enjoyment, and he really is at his best here, before his talents and contributions were watered down and finally fired the hell out of the band several years later. Gilmour is excellent too, while the bass aspects of Waters' bass guitar and Nick Mason's drums don't impress in the same way, but keep the whole thing grounded. Dick Parry has a great squealing sax solo in 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond' too.

'Shine On' was being performed by the band before they had even made plans for a new album, and as such the rest of the material is a little weaker and forced in an effort to fill up space, making me wonder what other delights or atrocities may have appeared if this had been produced in the digital world of longer playing times. A tribute to their old comrade Syd Barrett, a mad visionary with a penchant for gnomes, bikes and LSD, there was a famous incident where Syd turned up to the studio half-way through its recording and asked if he could 'do his bit.' There were tears and hugs from his former bandmates, and the spirit of Syd would dominate this entire recording. Some crazy people claim that this album syncs up with Ridley Scott's 'Blade Runner' in the same way 'Dark Side of the Moon' fits tenuously with 'The Wizard of Oz.' These people are wrong, and mad.

And if they really liked Syd Barrett that much, they probably would have let him do his bit, or at least a bit of something. But no cigar.

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Send comments to Frankingsteins (BETA) | Report this review (#112812)
Posted Tuesday, February 20, 2007 | Review Permalink
Mellotron Storm
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars How do you follow-up the greatest album ever made ? Well most bands would cave under that pressure but FLOYD creates an album that many (not me) consider to be even better than "Dark Side Of The Moon". It's interesting reading the behind the scenes stuff as they made this album because they went into Abbey Road Studios in January of 1975 having already come up with the track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" during rehearsals along with two other songs. But like the "Meddle" sessions the band had hit a wall.The ideas that the band were bouncing off of each other weren't working. Roger then suggested they dump the other two tracks from rehearsals (they would end up showing up on "Animals") and bridge the first and second halves of "Shine On..." with material that related in some way to the state they were in at the time. Gilmour disagreed but Nick and Richard said why not. Roger suggested the band members just unburden themselves as it were of what was bothering them. While they did this he took notes. Waters then came up with the lyrics. Like "Dark Side Of The Moon" he wrote all the lyrics for "Wish You Were Here".

On June 5th during the final session this overweight uninvited guest showed up with his head and eyebrows shaven. He was slow speaking and none of the band knew it was Syd for several minutes. Storm Thorgerson who was there relates : "...two or three people cried. He sat around and talked for a bit, but he really wasn't there". Roger was especially hit hard by what Syd had become.That was the last contact the band had with him.This event only makes the lyrics that Waters wrote previous to this even more special in my opinion.The cover art reflects the idea of two business men shaking hands on a deal with the one being burned as soon as he makes the deal.This is a picture of the record industry that FLOYD was apart of and yet despised as seen on those two tracks "Welcome To The Machine" and "Have A Cigar". It makes me laugh to wonder what the big-wigs at Columbia thought of "Welcome To The Machine" a song that is cold and mechanical about the music industry who are more concerned about making money then they are about distributing creative, quality music. Or the song "Have A Cigar" that is again about the music industry's greed and lack of morals. Not even knowing the bands or musicians, as put so well by the line "Oh by the way, which ones Pink ?" You have to love the scathing lyrics of Roger Waters, he sure knows how to rant. And it's very cool to hear Roy Harper sing on this track.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond" parts one and two, as well as the song "Wish You Were Here" are about former band mate Syd Barret and are all amazing songs. I would say "Wish You Were Here" is one of the greatest songs ever recorded. I'm glad the band invited Dick Parry back to play sax on "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", he did such a good job on this song as well as on "Dark Side Of The Moon". Lastly, the guitar work of David Gilmour is outstanding as usual, especially on the first song "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" and "Have A Cigar". Gilmour suddenly becomes a guitar hero on this album. Also the use of synths is way more prominant than they ever have been on previous FLOYD albums.

I've never been a huge fan of "Welcome To The Machine" or "Have A Cigar" although I appreciate them. Still they keep me from calling this a masterpiece.

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Send comments to Mellotron Storm (BETA) | Report this review (#113239)
Posted Friday, February 23, 2007 | Review Permalink
silvertree
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Next to Genesis's The Lamb and King Crimson's In The Court, Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here holds a special place in my heart. How lucky I was to grow up at the sound of these records ! Anyway, this is an absolute masterpiece and I very rarely use this word. If you really want to have an insight in prog rock, well you simply must at least have listened to this album, or better still, buy it. As far as I'm concerned this is Pink Floyd's best. The introduction to Shine on you crazy diamond has perhaps Gilmour's best guitar solo played over a delicate layer of synths. Have you ever tried to sing or whistle a guitar solo ? Well, this is one to remember for more than a lifetime. The use of synthesizers on Welcome to the Machine down to the acoustic guitar on the eponymous title that you can try to play on your guitar at a campfire, all the tracks are to be remembered. And give your kids a favour : make them listen to this album. They'll thank you for it.

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Send comments to silvertree (BETA) | Report this review (#113451)
Posted Sunday, February 25, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars With "Dark Side of the Moon," Pink Floyd had already achieved their status as supergroup. No longer did they have to conform to sell albums, nor did they care. The success of Dark Side would give them a steady, strong income for years to come. This album is a fight back at the music industry for constricting their creative prowess in the past, as is evident in "Have A Cigar" and "Welcome to the Machine." The other songs have been known to be tributes to former bandmate gone mad Syd Barret, with "Wish You Were Here" as the signature song of the album.

The ten stanzas of "Shine On" are perhaps the greatest examples of Space Rock on the face of the Earth. Merely listening to the first stanza gives the impression of deep space on the mind, with its mysteries still unsolved by that of mankind. It puts the listenener in a deep state of meditation and thought, and provokes the oddest sensations. No other song has the kind of positive effect "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" on me, and I'm positive that no other song will be able to move me in such a way.

As far as the rating goes, the quality that makes this essential is its power to provoke the mind and stir the senses. Its outlandish sounds and the images it conjures break every barrier in the confines of the Space Rock genre.

No other band sounds like Pink Floyd, and Pink Floyd never made a better album.

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Send comments to the_old_pink (BETA) | Report this review (#114336)
Posted Tuesday, March 06, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars This album may be one of Pink Floyds masterpiece (they have lots for me), and is one of my favourites album, if is not my favourite one, from, my favourite band.

Lets analize it song by song and see what happens:

Shine you crazy diamond part one (10/10): The first masterpiece of the album, wich is also the first part of a complete masterpiece. A beautiful song, full of magic and energy.

Welcome to the machine (8.5/10): An interesting song, quite powerfull and also of course psychodelic, is not even there the best song of the album, although I think is the worst of it, and its really great!

Have a Cigar (9/10): A very good song, with really interesting lyrics, its made just to sit down and enjoy, and, last but not least, the perfect end of this album.

Wish you were here (10/10): The other masterpiece of the album, a perfect song, one of the most emotionals I have ever heard in my life, maybe the most one. Gilmours guitar have the hole domain of it, and his voice and lyrics reach a perfection that its really hard to believe.

Shine you crazy diamond part two (10/10): The last masterpiece of the album, and the second part of the first one. Just the end of a masterpiece that leaves a sign in the whole music history.

Finishinf the review its important to add that this album was a dedication to the (unfortunately) now dead genious and creator of Pink Floyd, Syd Barret. A perfect album, what Barret always deserved.

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Send comments to Nash (BETA) | Report this review (#114504)
Posted Thursday, March 08, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars This classical masterpiece is where Pink Floyd pay their dues to the genius Syd.

A review song by song is not necessary in my opinion, since I think that like many Floyd album, it loses efficiency and power if not thought of as a whole. Not to mean that the songs aren't high quality or anything, but for instance, listening to "Have A Cigar" and not knowing that the effect at the end connects the song to "Wish You Were Here" seems as not taking complete advantage of Pink Floyd's wonderful creativeness.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond" both opens and closes the album, serving as a requiem to the disintegrated mind of Barrett's. This, known to be Pink Floyd's longest song ever, will certainly shift many people's top 20 list (as this album will do). It's been told before that "The Wall" or "Dark Side" are also about Syd, well, maybe, but certainly not that directly as it is on "Wish You Were Here". Personally, I find it very hard to find flaws about this production; from artwork to any detail you want, this album is perfect. With its outstanding atmosphere and musical quality, "WYWH" really is a journey every prog fan has to take. From any point of view, concept and lyrics, or music, this album has it all. True masterpiece.

Few notes; Roy Harper did a great job on "Have A Cigar", "Wish You Were Here" is perhaps the most overplayed Floyd song with "Another Brick In The Wall pt 2" (very sad thing) and personally I think that this album doesn't go so well with live performances. I listened to many bootlegs of WYWH, but none of them has the same atmosphere as the studio version does, not that I don't like Shine On played live.

Awesome album, dedicated to Syd Barrett. There also were some rumours that Syd did vocals on Shine On. Anyway, no question about the 5 stars.

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Send comments to taylanbil (BETA) | Report this review (#114562)
Posted Thursday, March 08, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd's greatest masterpiece

It is very difficult to add something new about an album with such a number of great reviews written before this one. "Wish You Were here" was my first prog LP, I bought it in 1976, listened to it hundred of times and is still in excellent condition. In fact is my favorite album and this feeling didn't change in the last 31 years.

All the tracks are great. In "Shine On You Crazy Diamond", Gilmour and Wright play in such a wonderful way that "perfection" is the only word to describe the song. The title track is brilliant, and sounds as if the guitars were played from the deepest part of the soul and not just with the hands. Every time I listen to the lyrics of this song, I feel a deep emotion very difficult to explain. The other two tracks are really good. In the original vinyl are positioned at the end of side one and beginning of side two and I always look at them as a breathe between perfection and........more perfection!!!!

I know that some people don't like Pink Floyd, and most of them say this is an overrated album. I can't really understand them. For those who don't know Pink Floyd, this is an excellent first approach and a must for every music lover.

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Send comments to Gabriel.V (BETA) | Report this review (#115353)
Posted Friday, March 16, 2007 | Review Permalink
Finnforest
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars This is one of those classics that requires little review. Everyone has heard this and everyone loves it. The emotional and masterfully told story of the band and their true leader, Syd.

By this time, there was significant infighting going on within the group. They were creatively drained and not sure which way to turn after the phenomenon of Dark Side. Gilmour was unhappy with Mason who was having marriage problems and thus in a funk, and Roger and Dave were squabbling about the material. Gilmour wanted to lay down Shine On and two of Roger's other ideas (which later ended up on Animals) and split. But Roger wanted to further develop the themes of Shine On into other more appropriate new material and take time to get it right. Thankfully for us, he won the battle and Welcome, Cigar, and WYWH became the rest of this album. In June of '75, Barrett walked into Abbey Road as the group were finishing Shine On and brought Waters to tears at seeing his condition. He stayed a while chatting with people and left without saying goodbye. The Floyd never saw Syd again. Syd severed his ties to his past and would live his later years in Cambridge happily painting away and gardening.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is one of the musical highlights of the Floyd, nothing but pure beauty as far as you can hear. Gilmour is flawless and Wright isn't too bad either. The other songs are less successful than the epic piece but all in all there is no denying this link in the string of Floyd classics. The title song is a nice acoustic number with great lyrics. Essential though not quite a masterpiece in my view.

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Send comments to Finnforest (BETA) | Report this review (#116000)
Posted Wednesday, March 21, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here includes some of the most personal and moving moments in the entire Pink Floyd catalogue, namely the title track and the two parts of the Syd Barrett homage Shine On You Crazy Diamond. But here you also find the very cold and mechanical Welcome To the Machine, a masterpiece in its own right, very often overlooked in favour of the more famous songs mentioned above. The remaining song, Have a Cigar, is the albums only weakness. It's a good song, but not as thrilling and magical as the other tracks, and the decision to use a guest vocalist makes it sound almost like something by a different band completely. But as a whole i find the album to be essential, an absolute must. Have a Cigar is perhaps a three star song, but the rest is without a doubt some of the greatest stuff ever recorded.

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Send comments to Kriton (BETA) | Report this review (#116033)
Posted Thursday, March 22, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars It is impossible to argue against the merit of this album. Although 'Animals' appeals more to my personal sensibilities, from a purely musical standpoint this sets itself apart as Floyd's finest hour. Not a single note is out of place. The mood and spirit are maintained throughout every track. It's not often moments like this occur in rock history. What else can I say about WYWH that hasn't already been said? If you don't own it, you are doing yourself a great disservice.

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Send comments to Disconnect (BETA) | Report this review (#118286)
Posted Friday, April 13, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars With the perfection and comercial success of Dark Side, it is difficult to believe that Pink Floyd's next album would put all of their previous work in its place. This is their greatest album, preiod. Waters, in complete control at this point, charges full speed ahead with ever more dark and cynical lyrics, and Gilmour is as good as ever. This tribute to Syd Barett, God rest his soul, soars to new heights, reaching perfection in new ways.

The album begins with a long introduction and a continuous but well-presented Gm chord, seting you up for a famous guitar riff, all four notes in all its glory. Then you are led to a slight change in mood as the music becomes slow and bluesy. A few minutes later the lyrics, and finally, back to that initial chord, this time with saxophone. A new aound fades in, overtaking the end of track 1 ("Shine On..."), the sound of the machine, and the amazing and dark "welcome to the Machine" begins. After the end of this magnificent piece, "Have a Cigar" begins, cynically mocking the record industry. Next is the fantasitc "Wish You Were Here" an acoustic lyrical masterpiece. Last but certainly not least is the second half of "Shine On...," and this is where it gets groovy.

This is a top notch album worthy of "essential to life" status. Buy it.

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Send comments to progroxmysox (BETA) | Report this review (#118769)
Posted Wednesday, April 18, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars I don't speak English 100% so I try my best: First, let me say that I start listen Pink Floyd with The Wall, I was 20 years and there was something I hear on it that I have never listen in others albums before so I wanted more. One friend give me The Dark Side of the Moon and told me it was their best work, and I was very surprised when I hear it, again, music, lyrics, concept,and so I became a Pink Floyd fan. A few months later I buyed Animals, then Meddle, etc....The thing is that I listen Wish you were here very late, but when I hear it I was sure it was the BEST ALBUM i ever hear. One of the things I like Floyd is that they never play music like circus men, never like 1000 notes X second, I hear with them the real Progressive music: The right note in the right time. And Wish you were here is the best example.

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Send comments to varmando (BETA) | Report this review (#119914)
Posted Thursday, April 26, 2007 | Review Permalink
TRoTZ
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars After the surprisingly enormous success of "Dark Side of the Moon", Pink Floyd had the courage and music sensibility to embrace new horizons, yet building another sophisticated, intense piece of music. Their great achievement was to build, from relatively simple orchestrated music, compositions which could intriguingly irradiate so much passion, so much dose of sensibility, this time in the boundaries of the metaphysical, the introspective, in a way rarely seen in music - a secret which hides in its elegant sequence of textures, and in the deepness of a tribute to a beloved friend, Syd Barrett.

The album is guided and, should I say, almost worth it only by the main song "Shine on You Crazy Diamond" - a long and compelling suite, divided in two movements, relying in dense textured atmospheres, majestic organs, heartbreaking guitars and saxophones. The spacey, thrilling and dramatic "Welcome to the Machine" presents a imaginary perfect world for him, while the hit "Wish You Were Here" shows a anguish and final goodbye, after the traces of joyfulness hidden in the memories revived in "Have a Cigar".

"Wish You Were Here" shines Pink Floyd's art at their peak. It is perhaps their most intense and dramatic work, an imposing memorable album which would touch generations, from decade to decade. Masterpiece.

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Send comments to TRoTZ (BETA) | Report this review (#122130)
Posted Monday, May 14, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars The Last Pink Floyd Album...

This is the very last album where you can feel an almost perfect cohesion of all the musicians and their instruments. An extremely present synth gives the album an incredibly psychedelic feel and showcases Rick Wright's musicianship like never before. SOYCD must be the best epic by the Floyd IMO.

No filler tracks, every single one is a classic. It is so vibrant you could almost say that this album is alive and breathing. An absolute classic!

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Send comments to April_Ethereal (BETA) | Report this review (#123022)
Posted Monday, May 21, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Here comes my review of one of the great works of progressive music. Pink floyd were the first progressive band I was hooked on. In fact, they were my first inspiration to start playing guitar. I started with The Division Bell, still one of my favourites. Some time later I heard Shine on You Crazy Diamond for the first time. I was disturbed by the beauty of this song. Pink Floyd will always remain among my top prog bands.

1. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (I-V): The intro of intros. Never have I heard such beautiful subtlety. Extended intros usually feel drawn out and boring. This can't be further from the case here. It takes a full four minutes for the song to kick in, four minutes of perfect songwriting. An atmospheric pad and distant horned instrument pave the way for a beautiful warm guitar solo. The instruments kick in with a crescendo. We hear soulful playing all around. There is no such thing as a filler note here. The song alternates between periods of relaxed almost psychadelic moments and periods of harshly emotional intensity. The vocals start only after 9 minutes. This idea blew my mind away the first time I listened to it. I was used to three minute mainstream songs with vocals starting after a few seconds. The solos throughout the song amazed me, both the guitar and sax solos. The song fades out to the frustrated soloing of the song and the fading in of a machine like sound. The length of this song hooked me onto epic songs, and I have not had enough yet. [9+]

2. Welcome To The Machine: This is one song that stands your hair straight. The introduction is straight out of some dystopian horror. The guitar chords are beautifully sad. The vocals are madly desperate. The lyrics couldn't have been written better. This song weeds out your horrors of society and presents them to you on a plate. You get a beautiful amalgamation of cold synthetic sounds and sad guitar strumming. The perfect atmosphere. This is the epitome of songwriting. I believe that few can excel beyond this level. [9]

3. Have A Cigar: This is quite a relaxed interlude. It tends towards the more narcotic side of Pink Floyd. This is chilled out music at its peak. You almost start imagining yourself in a seedy nightclub smoking some Havana cigars and feeling the beat throughout your body. Even the reverb on the vocals fits the vision. There is not much to be said about this particular song. Though not a bad song, I do not consider it as one of their greatest hits. A great song to chill out with and makes for a great break in the pace of the album. [7+]

4. Wish You Were Here: The title track and a very emotional one, as the name suggests. Gilmour's forlorn vocals are heavenly. You can't help but sing along when the piano starts the accompaniment of the acoustic guitar. The main acoustic riff will forever reside in the hall of fame riffs, the unforgettable ones. Though the songwriting is not very dynamic, the nostalgia in this song is something you can't get enough of. This song is one that I have turned to several times during bad periods, and one that I will turn to in the future too. The song fades out to the sound of rushing air, leaving me motionless and deep in thought. Great song. [8+]

5. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (VI-IX): Though the first part of this epic is much more popular, I like this as much as the first if not more. This is definitely proggier in the traditional sense. The beginning is rife with interesting weird keys, with the structure changing slightly at around 2:30, placing the guitar up front, whining a desperate solo. Beautiful harmony at around 4:20. It all quietens down a little bit around 4:40, letting loose another hall of fame riff. The vocals start up, with the melody being a continuation of that in the first part. Then you get a spaced out transition at 6:06, with clean arpeggios fading into a great jazzy section. This part is amazing. Relaxing jazzy chords sound out, accompanied by lap steel guitar and a bright gritty bass. Another beautiful transition at 9:10 or so, when the last slow section comes up. Piano chords and the horn instrument from the beginning play out to treat us to a very chilled out yet emotional outro. An amazing composition. [9+]

The average here works out to be 8.8. However, seeing as the two great tracks make up more than half of the album, and the rest not being too far below, I will gladly give this a 9. I don't wish to say anything more of this masterpiece. It really is one of the prog openers that most enthusiasts would have already listened to. I wish there were many more like this record. OVERALL, 9.0

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Send comments to Metalstrm (BETA) | Report this review (#123027)
Posted Monday, May 21, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars There's not a lot I can say that you won't have read in almost every other review. This album is a complete and utter masterpiece, from start to finish, and is easily my favourite of Floyd's releases.

Every track is superb, from the spacey and atmospheric 'Shine On' suite, to the amazingly beautiful acoustic title track, which is my favourite of the five tracks present.

If you're a Floyd fan, a prog fan, or just a fan of good music, you need to have this in your collection. It is one hundred percent essential!

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Send comments to garcia marquez (BETA) | Report this review (#123516)
Posted Saturday, May 26, 2007 | Review Permalink
Dim
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars An amazing album, An amazing prog album?

Dont get me wrong this is the one album you need if your a Floyd freak, but I dont believe it should be number three on a PROG album chart. For an album with five songs, with two of which are in no way prog, I have trouble thinking of it cracking the top twenty.

If I were to rat this album soley on how good it sounded, I would give it a five. On a rating for how progressive it is I will give it a three.

Shine on you crazy diamond- Your Typical Floyd epic with some lovely synth and guitar for the first five minuetes until it explodes into a blistering guitar solo. Then Waters' meloncholic tone it down for just two versus and two chorus' to go into a great sax solo.

Welcome to the machine- My favirote track on the album! Starts with some kind of machine giving us a very strange beat, then goes into a drop D acoustic guitar and great lyrics. Saving the best for last, Rick Wright Go's into a huge solo rivaling Wakeman or Emerson. His best solo to date.

Have a cigar- now to start the non-proginess. Not only is this song not progressive, Waters dosent even sing in it! I find that quite rediculus for a five song album (unless it were an instrumental). We do get saved by a very nice Gilmore solo at the end.

Wish you were here- Most people learn smoke on the water as thier first guitar song, but not Floyd fans! They learn the gorgeous wish you were here ballad first three notes. Even if this song is not prog, it is beautiful in everyway.

Shine on you crazy diamond part two- Crbon copy of the first one, but a little more aggressive and a weird jazzy elec. piano jam towards the end.

Overall good, but think about it. Does a five song album, with only three of those being prog, really belong in a top five spot on a PROG website?

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Send comments to Dim (BETA) | Report this review (#124120)
Posted Thursday, May 31, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars It's Pink Floyd's greatest album. I'd like to say to evevry person who said that the Shine on you Crazy Diamond was a too long song that they don't deserve to listen at Gilmour's magic music. Repeat the same chorus 5 times in a 3 minutes song like a lot a groups do is not musically intelligent. Pink Foyd presents in this album the possibility to get out from the basic stuff (verse, a chorus and a guitar solo). When you listen to that album, you enter slowly in it with the intro of the first song, then you go up, down, left and right, and you come back where you were in the beginning in the end. Saying that it's Pink Floyd best album is not enough: this is a real masterpiece, not like all the masterpieces coted in this site, it's a real one. Think before to say that an album has no weaknesses.

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Send comments to Stragliato (BETA) | Report this review (#126612)
Posted Saturday, June 23, 2007 | Review Permalink
ghost_of_morphy
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars Ok, I just don't get it. Pink Floyd released two true masterpieces in Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall. Animals is almost as good, and would probably be a third masterpiece if Pigs (Three Different Ones) had been as good as Dogs and Sheep. So why is everybody so high on Wish You Were Here?

Sure, Shine On You Crazy Diamond is very, very good. And yes, Wish You Were Here is probably the best thing that Floyd has ever done that didn't make onto TDSOTM or The Wall. But what about Have A Cigar? It's ok, but I'd hardly call it a classic Floyd track. The same goes for Welcome to the Machine.

I'm giving this three stars. I want to be clear that Animals (which I would give four stars) is definitely superior to this disc.

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Send comments to ghost_of_morphy (BETA) | Report this review (#127376)
Posted Monday, July 02, 2007 | Review Permalink
Kotro
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Instead of adding yet another simple description of the music and my appreciation for it to the long row of reviews, I thought about doing something different. So, instead of just rambling on about the musical content, I opted for bringing you an insider's view on the magnificent artwork of this seminal progressive rock album.

After the success of Dark Side it was quite difficult knowing what to do next. We had suggested seven different roughs for "Dark Side". In the case of Wish You Were Here we only suggested one, but it was a very complicated one. The basic theme derived from Shine On You Crazy Diamond, especially from Dave's haunting guitar chords, and Roger's lyrics. This theme was the sense of absence, of not being present in a relationship or conversation. This absence related to Syd Barrett, in more ways than one, and to the band's own difficulties in being there at the time making music, or in being a band at all - "Dark Side" was an even harder act for them to follow. All the pictures refer to absence in one form or another. The burning man is absent metaphorically - too frightened to be present, lest he be burned. The diver is absent physically, because his trace, or rather his splash, is missing. The "handshake" on the sticker is as much an empty gesture as a genuine greeting. The title "Wish You Were Here" then becomes relevant, and from the title came the post-card included in the original vinyl packaging. Could the design be one thing for the shops and another thing to the customer? Once you had bought the record there was no sense in being subjected to the same criteria of design and advertising as you would in the shop. At home there's no need to grab attention, or to be crassly provocative. So the cover was wrapped in a black plastic shrink wrap - one could not actually see what the design was. Since the theme of the album was absence, then the design in itself is absent, ie not visible. The idea was that when you got home you were supposed to peel off the black shrink wrap like undoing a present, and throw it away. One suspects that lot of people slit the plastic down the side with a scalpel in order to preserve the colourful sticker but still get the record out (there's no pleasing some folk). The actual shooting of the cover was rather dramatic in itself. The man diving into the lake, lake Mono in California, was a yoga expert who performed a handstand in a metal bucket frame. He held his breath for a long time so that the ripples caused by the commotion of getting into the diving position in the first place would die more or less away. He only had to do it 60 times, but then it is art, innit? We tried to say the same thing to the man we set on fire, but he didn't think that was very funny. Although he was wearing an asbestos suit and an asbestos wig, when we set him alight he was unfortunately facing the wrong way as regards to the wind. The wind caught the flames and blew them back into his face, burning his moustache severely. We had, in fact, to get him to turn the other way and shake hands with his left hand and then reverse the photo in the final print, which does give it a slightly strange quality. Art by misadventure.

in Pink Floyd Shine On - A Book to accompany the CD Box Set, 1992 Pink Floyd Music

About the music, well, that mostly goes without saying. Wish You Were Here and the first half of Shine On You Crazy Diamond are long-time radio friendly tunes. My favorite, however, are the less recognizable tracks. Despite being the only song in the album deserving of a videoclip, Welcome to the Machine, with its dark ambience and use of electronics, remains the obscurer track, along with the spacier and funkier bits on the second half of Shine On.. The bluesy Roy Harper/Gilmour guitar-driven Have a Cigar remains one of the fiercest criticisms to the music industry. One of the 70's Pink Floyd masterpieces, this album, with its sonic diversity but constantly progressive attitude, wether to rock, blues, or experimental electronics, is a guaranteed must have for the prog-head, and it will always have something of interest that will make you want you rediscover it time and time again.

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Send comments to Kotro (BETA) | Report this review (#127502)
Posted Wednesday, July 04, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars There's not that much more to add here. Shine On You Crazy Diamond is quite possibly the greatest ever progressive rock epic. Wish You Were Here - the track - is quite simple but full of emotion. The other two tracks - Welcome To The Machine and Have A Cigar - are not quite so strong but are excellent all the same. I would concur with David Gilmour that this is the band's finest achievement, ahead of Dark Side Of The Moon and a smidgen ahead of the follow up Animals. Five stars and absolutely essential.

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Send comments to Nigel66 (BETA) | Report this review (#128064)
Posted Wednesday, July 11, 2007 | Review Permalink
3 stars In my opinion this is one of the most overrated albums on this site. Don't get me wrong, it's a good album, but there are so many better ones to choose from. The main reason to buy this album is Shine On You Crazy Diamond, a multi-part song that encompasses the first and last tracks of the album. This song has many great moments, including David Gilmour's jazz-influenced guitar work during the opening, and Roger Water's lyrics; a tribute to their former bandmate Syd Barett. The two tracks that follow the first half of Shine On you Crazy Diamond are mediocre at best; while mildly enjoyable at points, there's nothing really intriguing about them. The next song, which is the title track, isn't really progressive, but that doesn't stop it from being a great song nonetheless. Overall, a good album, but if you have a recording of Shine on You Crazy Diamond elsewhere, there is no need to buy it.

Highlights: Shine On you Crazy Diamond, Wish you were Here

Lowlights: Welcome to the Machine, Have a Cigar

The Verdict: 3 stars

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Send comments to Progrock105 (BETA) | Report this review (#128102)
Posted Wednesday, July 11, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars One of the greatest albums of all by the Greatest Prog band ever!!! (ok - slight bias here) I am trying to review lesser known albums instead of the well known ones... but I had to do this one. This is a fantastic album, as with all Floyd, I can still listen to them even for the millionth time. All the tracks are standouts - no filler here. The album was written mostly by Roger Waters about the ex-Floyd member Syd Barrett, and how fame & drugs contributed to his breakdown. I'm not going to say too much about the album as there is not much that hasn't been said already.

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Send comments to Camera Eye (BETA) | Report this review (#128964)
Posted Monday, July 16, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars I find this to be the best album Pink Floyd has ever recorded. I think Gilmour and Waters were more mature in their compositions than in The Dark Side of The Moon. It is also a much more emotional album tha any other records because it was dedicated to the recently deceased Syd Barret, who showed to the studio when the album was being recorded. This album takes you on a journey that doesn't end for about an hour after you listened to it, when I listen to it i keep thinking about it for a long time. It is the album I hear the most and the one I think reached perfection in combining the lyrics with the music and the emotions it transmits.

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Send comments to Roger Waters (BETA) | Report this review (#129999)
Posted Monday, July 23, 2007 | Review Permalink
1800iareyay
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Following the massive success of Dark Side of the Moon, the pressure was on for Pink Floyd to deliver another hit. They did this in spades with Wish You Were Here, which is a semi-conceptual album that takes a look at their fallen leader Syd Barrett. The result is is classic of prog rock that stands the test of time as well as the other Floyd classics. Gilmour is the star of this album, as he plays some of the most unique and beautiful gitar you'll ever hear.

The album opens with the first half of "Shine On You Crazy Diamond." It builds ridiculously slowly over a few minutes of near silence before Gilmour pierces the heavens with his guitar. Waters' lyrics are touching and fond, but his vocals give the song a bit of a bite, expressing perhaps some hidden anger at how Barrett abandoned the band. The second half is equally as awe-inspiring, with more incredible guitar and keyboards and great lyrics. However, it has a more laid back and fades out with the same ethereal beauty in which t entered. "Welcome to the Machine" is a downright flawless track with great sound effects with dark lyrics that sound like the foundation for the album Animals. "Have a Cigar" is a great look into the music industry's exploitation of artists. Had it been played in a different style, it could have een a defining punk song. the title track is a beautiful ballad that takes the fondness of Shine On and removes the bitterness, leaving only a soft memorium for Syd.

WYWH is remarkable in that it actually manages to live up to the expectations following such a ridiculously successful album, and at times even betters it. No fan of prog oreven rock in general can be without this seminal release.

Grade: A

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Send comments to 1800iareyay (BETA) | Report this review (#130180)
Posted Wednesday, July 25, 2007 | Review Permalink
4 stars There's nothing to discuss about the music quality contained on this CD, it's everything already said before! You know: this is a great stuff, mindblowingly tunes, soft passages, subtle arrangements... highly reccomended and whatever you want. So, we are only going to discuss the absence of the fifth star in my rating.

I'll try to explain my reasons why I have little problems with this album. Let's see: first of all, it should be released before Dark Side Of The Moon to be a masterpiece, hehehe.......

Second, this is not an album that has SONGS in specific.... it's mainly a conceptual album, not as its predeccessor, which has clear songs. What does it mean and implies? More studio improvisation. And you know what? It could be even boring if the musicianship aren't quite skillful in their respectives instruments. That's it.

A third point is that simply I cannot get into acoustic Pink Floyd (Eg.: self-titled track). If you ask me for the highlight on this CD, I'd say "Welcome to the Machine", which has a great dramatic atmosphere. The opening & closing track (united by the same concept) are awesome and fantastics as you can get, but as I said before, I'm not into Floyd epic/jamming/improv (I explained the reason why)... I mean I like it, but I don't LOVE it.

IMO it's enough to face that Dark Side Of The Moon was the only real masterpiece from this band. In the other hand, WYWH is more comparable to its succesor Animals, which has the same "format" (five songs and a lot of long improv stuff). Well, I've just said all this and I hope I didn't make too many enemies because of this review... So, give another half star :)

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Send comments to sircosick (BETA) | Report this review (#130259)
Posted Wednesday, July 25, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Well I don't think there should be any argument as to the effect this album had on the prog rock scene. It is my favorite Floyd album and in many respects one of the best I have ever listened to.

The feelings I get from listening to Shine on you crazy diamond are just incomparable. It is a masterpiece by which others are measured.

Welcome to the machine is awesome. Wright's keyboard playing gives you the chills.

Have a cigar performed by Roy Harper is a must for guitar lovers. What a riff!

As for the title track anthem it is the ultimate soft ballad recognisable by millions of music fans!!!

This album continues in some aspect the essence of madness surrounding human life covered in DSOTM. Only here this is fully devoted to Syd and his absence from things he should be part of.

It is not of this review to make any comparison to other Floyd gems simply because it is a matter of subjectivity as to which one you think it's best. The vast majority would agree that DSOTM, Wish you were here and The Wall are the cornerstones of Floyd's career.

All of them truly essential for any music fan,not just a Floyd fan.

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Send comments to dark_angel07 (BETA) | Report this review (#130775)
Posted Monday, July 30, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars I think this is the album that iniciated me to Pink Floyd (long ago I didn't understand the obscure sounds of Dark Side, but this is another story), because it's one of the most "floydian", i don't find another way to say it. "Shine on you crazy diamond" is famous all over the world, a big nine-parts-suite, that introduces and finishes this masterpiece. The guitar solos are very moving and "wish you were here" is a nostalgical short track, maybe their most famous hit. And we have also "Welcome to the machine" and "Have a cigar", two "worrying" tracks, we could say the "dark side" of the LP. A true classic that is already "history"!

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Send comments to paloz (BETA) | Report this review (#131022)
Posted Wednesday, August 01, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars This album is a masterpiece beyond any known words.

The starting and ending track Shine On You Crazy Diamond sends you trough a magic journey filled with musical emotions and great musicianship, having bout an exciting, slow yet powerful emotional start to it and a great fading ending. The title track is also an excellent piece of musical history, and might quite possibly be one of the saddest most emotional songs I've heard.

There is not one single weak bone in the construction of this album. The production and the writing of bout music and lyrics expresses strong emotions in the typical manner this band is known for. And it's my personal opinion that this might be one of the best albums written by one of the best bands.

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Send comments to Lystmaler (BETA) | Report this review (#132848)
Posted Sunday, August 12, 2007 | Review Permalink
progaardvark
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars How do you follow-up a multi-million selling masterpiece like the Dark Side of the Moon? Easy. You make another masterpiece. And you make it even better. Which is exactly what Pink Floyd did. Wish You Were Here is considered by many, myself included, as the crowning achievement for Pink Floyd. True, it didn't sell as much as the Dark Side of the Moon, but it still sold a huge number of records. And that's always an achievement for a prog band, regardless of time period.

On Wish You Were Here, Pink Floyd continued with a conceptual album, this time dealing with the insanity of success in the rock business. Instead of a bunch of short tracks, this time they created a nine-part, mostly instrumental epic, and split it into two halves with three shorter pieces in between. Richard Wright played a more forward role with many lush synthesizers giving the band it's first truly symphonic prog album, though of course with the bluesy psychedelic touches still present. The nine-part Shine on You Crazy Diamond was a tribute to the band's original lead singer, Syd Barrett (who mysteriously showed up at the recording sessions for this album unannounced, overweight and with a shaved head). Welcome to the Machine is also an amazing song and of course the title track, a concert favorite many years after this was released. Roy Harper also does a wonderful performance as a guest vocalist on Have a Cigar.

Wish You Were Here featured the group at its best, musically and compositionally. The melodies, though often sad, are some of the most beautiful ever recorded. This is an absolute must-have and is one of the top 10 greatest progressive rock albums ever released. And yes, it is much, much better than their classic Dark Side of the Moon. Five stars.

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Send comments to progaardvark (BETA) | Report this review (#133209)
Posted Wednesday, August 15, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars The disclaimer that popped up before I began writing this review told me that not every album I enjoy will be a "masterpiece." That comment, although it is very true, does not apply in the slightest bit to "Wish You Were Here." In my opinion, "Wish You Were Here" is Floyd's best "golden age" (AKA 1973-1979) album, if not the best album of all time! The opening piece "Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-X)" starts with ethereal instrumental, building and building until the vocals start. A beautiful ode to founder Syd Barrett, the lyrics are among the Floyd's most heartwrenching. From there, we go on to "Welcome To The Machine." (I'm using the LP track listing, not the CD remaster). It's a truly chilling song, dealing with a popular subject in Roger Waters' lyrics: the music industry. The song sounds as if it belongs in a futuristic dystopic film, but it really deals with the past and the present, the machine that is the music business. This theme continues in the next song, "Have A Cigar." The lyrics are sung well by Roy Harper, a fellow Harvest Records artist. The title track is next. It's really a quite simple piece, but very, very beautiful. The lyrics, culled from a poem by Roger Waters, once deal with absence (namely that of Syd Barrett). And off we go into my personal favorite track on the album, "Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts XI-IX)." The track feels, for the first half, somewhat like part one. It lurks at first, and then grows and grows through excellent slide guitar work, and climaxes with the final verse. From there, there is a bit of jamming, and then Richard Wright's "musical eulogy" for Syd Barrett, Part IX. If you listen carefully, you can hear Richard sample from Syd Barrett's "See Emily Play," the band's second UK single. The album is essential to every progressive rock collection, as well as any music collection period. This is Pink Floyd's definitive album (yes, even more so than "The Dark Side of the Moon"), and you would be doing yourself a great disservice if you don't give it a listen.

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Send comments to Dirk Gently (BETA) | Report this review (#133391)
Posted Thursday, August 16, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars My high school days were full of PINK FLOYD and "Wish You Were Here" played a big role and still remains one of my all time most beloved albums. What a great introduction! And what a great ending! "Wish You Were Here" is really an epic album which blends all the right elements mixing blues and psychedelia with that classic PINK FLOYD space atmosphere. Without a question the opening to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" has to be one of the most memorable openings of all time. This album also features Roy Harper on vocals on "Have A Cigar" which is also one of my all time favorite PINK FLOYD numbers. This is essential music and is a definite statement and one of the all time classics.

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Send comments to slepptime (BETA) | Report this review (#138843)
Posted Monday, September 17, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Masterpiece!!! This album is surely one of the best ever. It even outdistanced its predecessor - The Dark Side Of The Moon. Great atmosphere. Great music. Great lyrics. Ideal.

Fist track is Shine On You Crazy Diamond. I love Waters singing verses in this song. When I hear it I just want to cry. So beautyful. Then, there is Welcome to The Machine. Very dark piece of music. The following track is Have a Cigar. Very good rock with nice parts of guitar and Roy Harper on vocal. And then Wish You Were Here - the most beautyful ballad ever. In the end - Shine On reprise, with fantastic change of themes, and very sad final organ solo.

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Send comments to mr bungle (BETA) | Report this review (#139405)
Posted Thursday, September 20, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here is one of the essential Pink Floyd albums. The Album starts out with the amazing tribute to the original lead singer and guitarist, Syd Barrett. Shine on You Crazy Diamond is a wonderful Progressive Rock song. Welcome to the Machine, while less progressive and harder Rock it is still an amazing song and a great addition to this album. Have a Cigar is another great song. The Title track is near perfect song. Then the song ends with end of Shine On. This album is the closest thing to perfect you could get. This album is a great follow up to Dark Side of the Moon.

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Send comments to TheMadCap (BETA) | Report this review (#140178)
Posted Sunday, September 23, 2007 | Review Permalink
FruMp
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars In my humble opinion Wish you were here is overrated, it's a fantastic album and one Pink Floyd's finest however I just don't see enough substance in it to justify calling it one of, if not the greatest prog album of all time.

'Shine on you crazy diamond' is a majestic song - truly a masterpiece I love every minute of it, probably Pink Floyd's greatest song and one of the best songs going round to be honest, it's just the rest of the album that lets me down. I find 'welcome to the machine' to be on the whole boring and to be honest quite abrasive (being a death metal fan I don't say that lightly either). 'Have a cigar' likewise bores me, it's easily the weakest song on the album and is quite a generic floyd song, it sounds like it belongs on the wall with the whole generic classic rock bluesy thing, don't get me wrong it's not an entirely bad song but it's not a really interesting one either. Wish you were here is a great pop song however in the context of a progressive rock album it's filler, it really doesn't belong.

In summary 'shine on you crazy diamond' is what this album is about for me, the other 3 songs aren't particularly progressive or interesting in comparison they are fairly straight forward rock songs, not to say they are bad but in relative terms however this is prog archives and I feel I should be judging this album on it's progressive merits. 4 stars mainly because 'shine on you crazy diamond' takes up most of the time on this album.

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Send comments to FruMp (BETA) | Report this review (#140434)
Posted Tuesday, September 25, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here-a tribute to Roger (Syd) Keith Barett. After "Dark side.." was released is when the band began to become undone...though there are very little signs of it. This was a very hard act, the follow up to a revolution. How do you do that? They did. It begins with Shine on You crazy diamond, and the special (and bizarre) thing about this track is that Syd after having no contact with the band for about seven years showed up! at the recording to that particular track! Richard Wright said:" He was bald fat and jumping up and down brushing his teeth" Welcome to the machine is good.. kind of overlong still good. "Have a cigar " (sung by Roy Harper) is also good, but the song by the same name of the album Wish you Were Here is the best song of the album and goes right up with the greatest Floyd songs..(money, another brick in the wall (pt2)comfortably numb.. etc) then shine on part 2...this is also one of there best and isn't ever matched musically again.5 out of 5

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Send comments to hipnotic (BETA) | Report this review (#140470)
Posted Tuesday, September 25, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars PINK FLOYD Wish You Were Here .what an album .Pink Floyd's finest moment . i just want to say that i love it .every song is amazing .

1. Shine on you crazy diamond Part one .a truly masterpiece .i was listen to this song in the dark of my living room and just blow me away every time 2. Welcome to the machine . great song especially Richard Wright solos 3. Have a cigar ,classic floyd sound 4. Wish you were here .great song and fantastic lyrics 5. Shine on you crazy diamond p2 . An amazing composition this is one of my top five albums and it is a masterpiece of progressive music.every prog fans must have this !!!!!!!!!

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Send comments to martinprog77 (BETA) | Report this review (#140724)
Posted Thursday, September 27, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars In my opinion, this floyd album is second only to the godly Animals. After hearing Dark Side of The Moon, I thought nothing could compare to it. howerever, i was blown away when i first put this album on. Within the first two minutes of Shine On (I-V), I was hooked. Gilmour's melodic playing on opener as well as Have a Cigar and the title track are amazing. The vocal harmonies of the choruses or SOYCD are mind blowing, as well as the snyth parts of Welcome to the Machine. And of course, Wish You Were Here (the song) is a song that even the greatest words cannot describe. Anyone who enjoys prog music should definately have this album.

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Send comments to theanalogkid82 (BETA) | Report this review (#141086)
Posted Saturday, September 29, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars To me, Wish You Were Here is the greatest progressive rock album ever recorded for a number of reasons, both personal and in the scheme of things.

1) WYWH was the first album i bought that broke my age barrier. I stopped listening to nickelback and creed and started dabbling into the darker, if you will, arts. I was 14, and am now 17, and i've never stopped my adventure into the endless types of music that exist, and it starts with this perfectly constructed, smooth as silk album.

2) Of all of the music i've heard in my life, no album has ever been more heart-felt and true than this one. Lyrically, Pink Floyd peaked with songs about the dangers of fame, lonliness, and big brother.

3) Musically, this album soars. The beautifully gentle guitar work builds on top of it self from a breeze to a storm that leaves the listener completely stunned. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pt. 1 is an epic beauty that fills your head with stars and wonder like no other song is able to do. Of course each song following has similar effects, but does them in different ways, some more gentle, some more extreme.

All in all, Wish You Were Here is the best song on the album as well. Song construction of such smooth perfectness is impossible to find in any song written past it. Ending in a tornado and once again it builds to the climax, which is, Shine On You Crazy Diamond pt. 2, the perfect closer

Never in my life has an album been so striking right from the beginning as being perfect, Pink Floyd released the greatest album ever recorded.

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Send comments to therevelator (BETA) | Report this review (#141620)
Posted Wednesday, October 03, 2007 | Review Permalink
progrules
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars For a long time I considered the famous maintrack of 25 minutes by Pink Floyd one of the best if not the best prog composition ever. Of course it is but unfortunately I always had a sort of dislike for the vocal aspect of the song. I don't like the chorus, the rest of the masterpiece is of course absolutely terrific but it's the reason the song will never be my absolute number one. The title track that is considered a supersong by many is not one of my favourites. I think it's a bit dull, nothing special. Welcome to the machine is much more to my liking. A special song that really gives you a machine feeling thanks to the beginning. But my very pearl of this album is Have a cigar. This song is still regularly to be heard on dutch radio and when I hear the start of it I enthusiastically long for the final 2 minutes of the song, one of the best guitar solos ever by mr. Gilmour. Brilliant !!

All in all of course a great classic this album but I have to give it 4*

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Send comments to progrules (BETA) | Report this review (#141639)
Posted Wednesday, October 03, 2007 | Review Permalink
Prog Leviathan
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars Not quite as powerful to me as "Dark Side" (largely due, I think, to the abundant gaps of bland air between the good stuff) which is, nonetheless, an undeniably powerful and enjoyable listen; my choice for second best Floyd album despite the fact that "Wish You Were Here" is probably more complex and cerebral than "Dark Side".

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Send comments to Prog Leviathan (BETA) | Report this review (#145361)
Posted Wednesday, October 17, 2007 | Review Permalink
TGM: Orb
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars After the artistic and commercial success of Dark Side Of The Moon, Floyd somehow followed it up with another masterpiece. Now, I'm sure everyone has probably already heard this by the time they're on the site (if not, what are you waiting for? Head for vendor of choice and buy this album), so I'm going to keep this fairly brief.

Wish You Were Here is an album which is quite unlike any other I own. The playing and composition is extremely individual, the lyrics are inspired and unique, and the cover art and style is every bit a match for Dark Side Of The Moon.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond sounds 123% better in the dark, where its surrealism and beauty seem most unique, but regardless of the time of day, it's still the best thing on the album, possibly the best thing Floyd did. An atmospheric extravaganza, with lush, near-religious and heartmelting keys, gentle, liquid percussion and the peak of Gilmour's soulful and bluesy guitar coming together to form an entity of wandering, dreamy and bleak character before the jarring soul of Sid's Theme (an unmistakeable four-note entity) bursts into the vivid dream, chased on by the vibrant life of Waters and Mason and some colourful Gilmour soloing. Wright's keys take a gospel-like significance, building carefully in power as the blazing guitar reaches its climax. A guitar throb adds some extra weight to rhythm section, which is punctuated with some breathless and understated escapes from Mason and Waters. As this atmosphere reaches its zenith, a churchlike organ meets with Gilmour's unforgettable vocal, reinforced with immaculately arranged backing vocals (the way they slowly, individually develop and drop off is breathtaking) and guitar and some perfect bass swells are overshadowed only by the sheer surrealistic beauty of Waters' lyrics. As the vocal part, brief, yet memorable, fades away, a clean, but nonetheless sweltering sax (courtesy of Dick Parry) acts as an unmistakeable voice over the bright, gripping, four-note-based Gilmour theme, and as Wright's glimmering keyboards bring the song down to its conclusion, the sax goes into a maddened life of its own, growing faster and more demanding. Both beautiful and saddening, a true masterpiece.

While we're on this one, a small comment on what virtuosity is wouldn't be out of order. Virtuosity is really not just about technique and speed, and the two lead players on this maybe show that. It takes more talent, in my view, to come up with and bring out the character of themes such as Sid's theme or the lilting accompaniment to the sax than to accomplish any number of cool-sounding riffs or solos... these guitar parts are absolute gold, and this song alone establishes David Gilmour in the upper echelons of the guitar world. Equally, if not more, impressive, is the late Rick Wright's playing on this song. I've yet to hear another song which uses keys quite like this: the subtle, yet insistent effect of the carefully treated organs, the dripping, mystical, clear synths and the cleansing layers of more blanketing synthesisers are put together in a completely unique way, with Wright drawing as much effect out of a change in volume, a modulating pedal or a slight difference in tone as any other organist could draw out of a monstrous riff. Personally, I think this qualifies as virtuosity and great playing as much as any of the Dream Theater, Yes, Mahavishnu Orchestra technical fireworks.

A menacing thrumming and short bursts of precisely-planned feedback bring up the insistent mechanical bass pulse of Welcome To The Machine, potentially the world's most avant-garde ballad, introducing the detached, cold and aggressive guitar strumming for mere seconds before the electronic spaciness completely takes over the soul of the song, bringing up the guitar's effect throughout the verses. The guitar returns for the chorus, but any warmth is, rather unusually, provided through desperate keys and the escapades of the bass and near-orchestral drum rolls. Wright pulls off a remarkably individual synthesiser part. The vocals are savage here, and the lyrics match in biting aggression and demand (Welcome my son, welcome to the machine/what did you dream? It's alright, we told you what to dream), here about a disillusion with the music business and even the continual commercial, generic side of music (shown by the coldness of the vocals and the guitar as opposed to the surprising relative warmth of the conventionally more emotionless instrumentation). Simply an incredibly clever and intelligent piece of music, and I have to admit, I didn't get it at first... but nonetheless I liked it... accessible, and yet clear, clear evidence that the experimental, psychedelic and creative Floyd that gave us numbers like A Saucerful Of Secrets or One Of These Days was still around in 1975. And also an interesting thing to bring up when people say Animals was the most prog Floyd album... is prog about complexity... not really, it's about creating tunes which are completely experimental, unique and creative and then making them sound good... this is such a tune.

In stark contrast, the ironically commercialised, sleazy and satyrical style of Have A Cigar shows off the writing side of Pink Floyd. A grabbing little guitar part runs through, with some jazzy Wright e-piano flourishes running through and another swirling Wright synth over the groovy rhythm section. The guitar part is deceptively fast and mobile within the context of its neat riff, and the song has a pretty much perfect pop dynamic combined with a cynically experimental edge and some strained guitar soloing hidden in the piece. A biting set of lyrics adds to the music biz bashing begun in Welcome To The Machine, and Roy Harper's rather good voice belts them out with a vindictive sleaze to match the. The song fades away slowly with a classy bit of bluesy soloing, as well one of Roger Waters' better bass parts. The hilarious, and very well-timed, radio-style fading, acts as a sort of link between this and the follower, and is evidence of Floyd's ability to write two great songs, individually capable singles, and yet link them in a way that makes the album so much more than just the sum of the parts.

Some sound effects lead onto the follower, the immensely and justly acclaimed Wish You Were Here. No gimmicks, other than the slightly reduced volume of the backing guitar, just a soulful acoustic, folky strumming, clear, and completely moving vocals, one of the best sets of lyrics Roger Waters ever wrote ('how I wish, how I wish you were here/we're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl, year after year'), and completely memorable piano and synth touches from Wright. Swirling winds lead from this lament back to the the surreal wonderland of Shine On You Crazy Diamond (pts. 6-9). Just about a perfect example of memorable songwriting, and the guitar solo is unique in style.

Jaunty guitar and bass, and throbbing percussion continue the atmosphere of the song, with haunting, interlinked lead synth parts replacing the background organs of pts. 1-5. The gripping guitars and swirling synths provide the jam with increasingly assertive impetus, while Waters and Mason groove along in their own way. As Gilmour returns to the guitar part which marked the vocal section of pts. 1-5, another reverent organ completes the return of the 'essence' of the song (for want of a better word). Another mystical verse, this time replete with Gilmour soloing in between the notes, leads off into another atmosphere-drenched, if rather upbeat, jam, complete with some very collected e-piano, an extremely cool funk riff from Wright or Gilmour (not sure which) and some solid bass and guitar filling out the optimistic madness of the piece. Wright and Mason lead off the whole thing into its majestic, crowning conclusion, with the clear piano chords conveying a real feeling of glory and triumph, counterbalanced by a final melancholy, sax-like synth. Just as impressive as the first part of the song, but it needs a little more time to really sink in and to be thought of as a continuation of it.

So, there you have it. Another rewrite. An essential masterpiece of progressive rock, because it really sounds like nothing else out there, a brilliantly written and very experimental album masquerading as two jams and three 'accessible' songs, and something that you should really treasure as an album if you've any taste for atmosphere or great guitar. Floyd were still on form for this one. And, because I don't say this enough, David Gilmour had a great voice, and Roger Waters was an amazing lyricist.

Rating: Five Stars. Simply incredible. Favourite Track: Still Shine On You Crazy Diamond (pts. 1-5), but Welcome To The Machine has grown on me exponentially since I wrote my first review here... of this album.

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Send comments to TGM: Orb (BETA) | Report this review (#146294)
Posted Sunday, October 21, 2007 | Review Permalink
4 stars This is without a doubt the best Pink Floyd album of all time, but I can not in good conscience grant even the best Pink Floyd album a five-star rating, as so many others have done here. That would insulting to many of the other prog albums that I cherish so dearly and hold on high as genuine five-star albums. I can't rate this album on the same level as Close To the Edge or Selling England By the Pound, as I have never felt that the players in Pink Floyd could hold a candle to those in most other prog bands that I am familiar with. But, the music here is still tremendous, certainly, and I appreciate the fact that this album was conceived in the wake of Dark Side of the Moon, a runaway train of an album, the success of which obviously took the band by surprise. The songs on this album are powerhouses of emotion. Welcome to the Machine and Have a Cigar are so brooding, Wish You Were Here so melancholy, Shine On You Crazy Diamond so transcendent.

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Send comments to Sgt. Baker (BETA) | Report this review (#146630)
Posted Tuesday, October 23, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Maybe the best progressive album studio.

Shine on you crazy Diamond is an Epic piece that could have been a side long piece but instead was split in half (part one being the intro and part two being the outro). This was revisited in the follow up, Animals with Pigs on the Wing. This pays off and is an interesting thing to do and allows more space of the vinyls, i pressume. Shine on You crazy Diamond is a prog rock anthem and really shows off the almost impossible task of bettering Dark Side of the Moon. The synth, piano and mellow guitar intro is classic and plays for just the right time so that it doesn't get boring and at the same time provides the ultimate build up to a guitar solo if there ever was one. The solo arrives, and it shakes the foundations of your speakers and your mind, and you sit back and let it flow through your veins and you think "oh my god! this is the best thing i've ever heard". I feel very lucky to be here to appreciate this and so should anyone else. If you're not a fan of prog rock then this will probably change your mind.

The soloage continues and progressess loudly and powerfully into some of gilmour's most powerful and emotional vocals ever which can bring a tear to your eyes. The lyrics, of course, relating to syd "you piper, you prisoner". These lyrics may be seen as a step down as they are not about dark stuff like in DSOTM, animals or the wall but the way they create the perfect tribute to Syd makes up for this, its nice to let the lads have a happier one for a change.

Wish You Were Here also see's a little less psychadelia as the band seem to have been growing out of it since atom heart mother, still these are stoner anthems and trippy but its nice to see the band evolving into more meaningful music and lyrics. The piano, bass, drums are all brilliant as you can expect and fit in well (even if they are a bit toned down from the likes of the 60's stuff). Dick Parry is back to deliver excellent sax pieces on both parts of the album.

And we have now reached "Welcome to the Machine". A really evil piece by the floyd but brilliant none-the-less. The fun and games are over here and the dull vocals, lyrics and droning guitars may get repetitive but it builds up tension and anguish that keeps the song going and is surprisingly one of the stand out tracks on the album. This may be incorparted into the mechanical handshake logo on the album cover. "Have a Cigar" is also a beastly effort and features Roy Harper on vocals. This song is an attack at media in music and how the band are against selling out. The lyrics achieve this perfectly and there is a dark irony in having Roy sing on this track. But hats off to him, he does the job well.

The title track is an odd one but is one of the most beautiful pieces gimour has ever written. It moves slowly yet progresses slyly and features only a few lines of tear embracing lyrics. Very moving and emotional. This song can also be related to syd. Ironicly the band were wishing syd was here at the same time as syd sneaked into to watch them record the album but the boys didnt even recognise him. This album ends where Shine on left of. A masterpiece and probably the most musically propelling piece the floyd have ever done. This has to be the best follow up to a masterpiece ever. and it doesn't stop there. I bet Syd was proud.

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Send comments to lizard king (BETA) | Report this review (#147240)
Posted Friday, October 26, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Good album - it's Floyd at its best, and it is 5.0 only for me (but in Floyd ranking this album is about #3 after DSotM and The Wall). Shine On Your Crazy Diamond is a great song, intro is great, main part is great, but sax outtro is weak, I think. Welcome To The Machine is very true and it is on the right place - after Shine On Your Crazy Diamond this song doesn't looks weak. Have A Cigar is weaker, I don't like bass intro in the beginning of it. Wish You Were Here is very great, I have no comments for it. And the last parts of Shine On Your Crazy Diamond are the good continue of first parts, but I think they are not enough good for great improvisation.

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Send comments to Stanislav (BETA) | Report this review (#149403)
Posted Wednesday, November 07, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars In my opinion the last album of Pink Floyd's golden age. Even if I love Animals and The Wall, there not really as perfect as this. The clean and soft sound of Dark side is even greater on this album, marvelous production. It's hard to pick a favourite song on this, all five tracks are five star songs. The title track is so beatiful that I sometimes cry when I hear it, and is a more simple composition than the others. 'Welcome to the machine' is so powerful it almost scares me. I don't really know what to say about 'Shine on you...', it's just excellent. I think 'Have a cigar' is the weakest track, but as I said, even this is worth five stars. This album is simply a must in every record collection, prog head or not.

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Send comments to symbiosis (BETA) | Report this review (#149678)
Posted Friday, November 09, 2007 | Review Permalink
russellk
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars An album of vast sounds and small perfections.

After their wildly successful 'Dark Side of the Moon', PINK FLOYD had achieved what they'd set out to do. According to NICK MASON, 1974 became a year of wasted experiments and increasing band frustrations, and by early 1975 the band had little to offer but tension and three long songs they'd played live (Nick Mason, Inside Out). These were not the ideal circumstances to produce arguably the most respected album on this site.

In my opinion PINK FLOYD had run out of things to say, and had begun to lose the will to say them. That's why this album's concept harks back to the days of SYD BARRETT and his intense creativity. 'Wish You Were Here' is an album expressing the band's wish that someone could give them the creative spark they needed. This is not a promising position from which to record an album, and the problem was only exacerbated by the addition of the anti-music business sub-plot. This is the favourite topic of any band who makes it big and becomes alienated from reality: their own world reduces down to tours, hotel rooms and contracts, underlined by the disappointment that great success doesn't automatically translate to great wealth. Remember that 'Dark Side Of The Moon' took many years to sell its extraordinary numbers, so by early 1975 there was hype and growing chart success but no millions.

'Wish You Were Here' is an album about 'absence', according to ROGER WATERS. In my view, it is about the absence of inspiration and reward, not just the absence of SYD.

So why, given these handicaps, is it so good? Because with this album PINK FLOYD perfect the space-rock sound, a universe in breadth but with incredible attention given to the smallest detail. This is nowhere more clearly demonstrated than in the first four minutes of the album. 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part 1' is essentially one chord, but essentially defines space-rock. RICK WRIGHT's keyboard is perfect: wonderful tone and infinite depth, gradually expanding to dominate the speakers. How does one chord do this? First, it is supplemented by a legion of small perfections, little sounds that contrast with the enormous chord in the way that stars stud the great void. Juicy little tinkles, creaks and later precise guitar notes - leading to one of the most sublime and simple moments in rock: the guitar from 2:10 leads us to a majestic chord change at 2:23 - it's as though the starfields shift and we get a glimpse into another universe. Yes, this is only music, but this is what space-rock is supposed to do: engage the imagination and send the soul soaring beyond human limitations of body and vision. Truly, this is majestic music. Given the 'absence' of vocals (deliberately there are no vocals for a full eight and a half minutes, part of the 'absence' theme), at this point what does it matter what theme the album is about? It's all about the music, and the music is majestic. Part 1 fades, and GILMOUR introduces perhaps one of the most famous four-note phrases in music.

And we're off, into faster and slower sections, solos of beauty, all played at a deliberate pace. I'm not a fan of the vocals. WATERS wasn't the best choice, though by this time it appears as though WATERS wasn't giving anyone a choice: he had begun to insist on doing his own vocals, apparently later regretting not doing 'Have a Cigar'. But the track is not about the vocals. The most powerful solo is, with typical FLOYD genius, not given to GILMOUR at all, but is passed on to DICK PARRY's saxophone to bring the opener to a satisfying conclusion ... to be resumed later.

'Welcome to the Machine' hasn't aged well. It's a relatively early synth-based track, and sounds somewhat dated to modern ears, but at the time it was sensational. The combination of the pulsing synths and cold vocals evoke the music machine, and for once WATERS' sarcasm works well. We are treated to FLOYD's obligatory sound effects, perhaps a little cheesy but fascinating to a teenager spinning the disc for the first time. The album, like all in this period, is a series of musical ideas tied together by sounds, segues and solos (the three S's of PINK FLOYD), with more of an emphasis on the latter two than on the tighter and more idea-rich 'Dark Side of the Moon'. We could have done without the sound effects here.

'Have a Cigar' continues the anti-music industry theme, but more important than either this or ROY HARPER's vocals, contains one of GILMOUR's most stunning guitar solos. He's given his head, and this really does hum. It gives the album the punch it needs, and is placed perfectly to lead (bizarrely and with one of the band's most inspired segues) into PINK FLOYD's best ballad, the simple, beautiful title track. Simple - look at the chords - beautiful - look how they put them together.

And so to the second half of 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond' and more GILMOUR pyrotechnics, prefaced by an excellent rumbling trademark WATERS bassline and some WRIGHT magic. Of all the solos GILMOUR's ever played, I rate this one, played on the slide guitar, as perhaps the best he's ever done, for sheer emotion and over-the-top histrionics. What a moment when he harmonises with himself! The inevitable fall from this great height is perfectly sculpted and entirely intentional: after a 'Funky Dung/Echoes/Any Colour You Like' funk section, the last minutes of the song, and the album, slowly fade into silence in the most melancholy fashion. I can remember being somewhat disappointed at this tame ending, but now it seems entirely justified, given the poignancy of the main theme.

Composition is king, nowhere more eloquently demonstrated than on this album. PINK FLOYD may have not had much to say, but that absence is so wonderfully sculpted into a soaring soundscape that defines the space-rock genre. This is an absolutely essential record.

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Send comments to russellk (BETA) | Report this review (#150439)
Posted Monday, November 12, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars There are many who would argue that this recording excels above that of Dark Side of the Moon. There are many who would argue the opposite. I will take the middle ground on this one, which means that everyone can feel free to disagree. In terms of overall concept and package, Dark Side of the Moon is better. With respect to musical ideas and execution, Wish You Were Here wins hands down. Take your pick. As for me, this is Richard Wright's best keyboard/synthesizer work and Gilmour's best guitar work. As with Dark Side of the Moon, this recording has lots and lots of reviews. Seeing as that is the case, I will not elaborate further on what has already been said numerous times and incredibly well. But, if you are first getting into progressive rock of this era, this is a true "must-have" recording.

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Send comments to LARKSTONGUE (BETA) | Report this review (#151737)
Posted Monday, November 19, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Gotta do it, man. This is one of the greatest albums of all time. This is Floyd in their prime, not as good as Dark Side of the Moon but still excellent. David Gilmour is one of the greatest guitarists ever, his playing is just so epic and melodic and tasteful. The flourish on Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pt. 1 is one of the most epic guitar parts of all time. Welcome to the Machine is one of my favorite songs by the band; it's so Floyd it's not even funny. Have a Cigar; same. The synth riff is classic, and Gilmour's playing; super epic. The title track is simply one of the greatest laments of all time, I still get goosebumps listening to it. Pt. 2 of Shine On might be even better than Pt. 1, they get into this funky jam with spacey synths and it's just epic beyond all epicness. Anyway, if you honestly don't have the album and you're on this website... well WTF; get it!

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Send comments to King Crimson776 (BETA) | Report this review (#152308)
Posted Thursday, November 22, 2007 | Review Permalink
2 stars Why oh why oh why is this so highly rated? Shine on part one is acceptable, but the central three songs are irrelevant, and Shine on part two is again only acceptable. It's a rare thing that the album cover be better than the album itself. This is, however, a step up from the previous albums, which are fairly reprehensible. Shine on, although far too long, is quite nice in parts. Some of it is pretension, (a four note riff does not comprise a theme, chaps) but some of it is listenable. Generally, however, this cannot be considered as in the same universe as the Symphonic prog of the time.

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Send comments to La fraisne (BETA) | Report this review (#153133)
Posted Thursday, November 29, 2007 | Review Permalink
b_olariu
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars An overrated album, not by far their best, like is praised all the time here. Is so much great music to descover from the '70's that is hard for me to listen more than twice a year this album. Is not a bad album, that is no doubt but to me is almost boring. Shine one crazy diamond part I is stunning very smooth and is clear that the members are very talented, but Have a cigar is a mediocre piece, the other tracks are so so. This album has an istorical importance to many , no doubt Pink Floyd is one of the major influence in music, but to me is an overrated band, that doesn't mean i under appreciate thier talent and creativity throgh the years. So a 3 star album for me, the next one Animals is much better and is my favourite Floyd album.

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Send comments to b_olariu (BETA) | Report this review (#153956)
Posted Monday, December 03, 2007 | Review Permalink
Tom Ozric
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Pink Floyd's 'Wish You Were Here' should be one of the Prog-Lover's listening Utopia's. Countless reviews are made here at the archives, so, short and sweet, darn near everything is perfect, Guitar solos - touching and mournful, Keyboards (Mini-Moogs, Hammond, String Synth, Piano, Clavinet) are put to good use, in a most inspired way, and the Drums are played tastefully by Nick Mason, a fairly simplistic drummer, but ever so tasteful. Roger Waters Bass-lines are perfect for the compositions here, especially when he utilises over-dubs and flanging effects ; exactly what is needed to bring the rhythm to life. A most profound, classy, accessible and memorable listening experience. 5 Star, no less !!

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Send comments to Tom Ozric (BETA) | Report this review (#154249)
Posted Wednesday, December 05, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Again, i wont say too much as much has been said, but another masterpiece from the Floyd. They seem to have fully developed their style now, and like to branch off a little. Waters wrote almost all of this album, as he did Dark Side, and it shows. Shine on is of course, epic jamming and singing to Syd Barret, with multiple guitar solos throughout, one of Gilmour's Finest moments. Welcome to the machine is a spacey, evil ballad with lots of sound effects and synths. Its either Waters or Gilmour who is screaming mad. Have a Cigar is another great guitar song from Gilmour, with a guest singer, as Waters was too worn out from shine on, and Gilmour didnt think he could do it justice. Wish you Were Here is a ballad, to Syd Barret and his distance from real life, and the band members' distance from one another. This album is associated with a great Barret quote. While recording it, Barret came in, looking 60 at the age of 30. He said, upon hearing the band listen to Shine on many times, "Why play it again? you've heard it once already."

Overall, yet another masterpiece, setting the stage for Waters' egocentrism to start to take over the band and its live shows.

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Send comments to The Ace Face (BETA) | Report this review (#154517)
Posted Thursday, December 06, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars Three-fifths of Wish You Were Here has that perfect future music feel to it which every space-rock lover is permanently searching for.

Here a track-by-track:

Shine On (part one) - 9

Has the most amazing beginning of an album I've ever heard: we all know how it goes...if you don't then you should.

Welcome To The Machine - 8

This would be a 10 if it was instrumental! The synth-play is simply amazing and it seeps into the next song perfectly. The singing spoils it in that it reminds you the music is made by humans and not by some artificial life 2000 years from now.

Have A Cigar - 6

After over a decade I still haven't warmed to this song...it just seems so out of place and doesn't have the warmth and likeability of the title track. There's little doubt the guitar work and Roy Harper's singing are spot-on but it feels like a better-produced Obscured By Clouds number.

Wish You Were Here - 9

Tragically, I recently heard The Beatless Sense Mongers cover this and have struggled to take the original as seriously as I used to. Which is why Comfortably Numb will always be a 10-score as resistent as it is to any form of piss-taking and why the title track is only a 9...but it still is one of Pink Floyd's most lovely moments.

Shine On (part two) - 11!

THIS-IS-JUST-UNSPEAKABLY-BRILLIANT!! This with Atom Heart (the suite) and The Trial are my all-time favourite Floyd moments. Okay Money and Great Gig too...and Interstellar Overdrive...and (sorry, I'll stop).

It's enough to say that Shine On Part Two is dancy, tripped-out spacefunk with Gilmour's greatest solo and inhuman efforts from everyone else.

---

Although Have A Cigar is average, and Welcome has some iffy vocals, this is clearly a 5-star album because it features simply some of the best music you'll ever hear.

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Send comments to dholl (BETA) | Report this review (#156737)
Posted Wednesday, December 26, 2007 | Review Permalink
5 stars PINK FLOYD's Wish You Were Here is one of those albums that I consider to be almost completely perfect, a true masterpiece. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is the best intro/outro to an album I have ever heard, and every track on the album is creative and musical.

Although Dark Side of the Moon is considered their most popular piece (that is my observation at least), I personally enjoy Wish You Were Here more. That is not to say DSotM is by any means a poor album, I just prefer Wish You Were Here. Wish You Were Here has everything from beautiful ambiances to some rocking pieces. I feel as though there is a song for any mood, and any person. With that in mind, this album truly deserves 5 stars, because it is a masterpiece.

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Send comments to asimplemistake (BETA) | Report this review (#157159)
Posted Sunday, December 30, 2007 | Review Permalink
Chicapah
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars For those who don't (or can't) fully appreciate the sadly diminishing art of making a complete album of well-thought-out and immaculately-executed music and lyrics I present as evidence this masterpiece by Pink Floyd. Taken and experienced as individual songs these tunes may be no more memorable than any number of FM radio staples echoing endlessly from the 70s but when listened to as a wholly intertwined concept the result is nothing short of overwhelming. No wonder it is so revered in the kingdom of progressive rock.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 1)" slowly dawns like the gradual rising of a full moon on a cold winter night as David Gilmour and Richard Wright paint an intimate palette before a tolling, bell-like quintet of haunting guitar notes defines the mood and ushers in the rest of the band to perform the greatest prog rock blues song of all time. David's deftly phrased and tasteful licks are a delight to behold as they leisurely go about setting the sober tone of the piece. However, when Roger Waters' inimitable vocals come in all subtlety is abandoned and a full chorus enters en masse to back his wistful singing and words that cut like a knife. Obviously aimed at AWOL group founder Syd Barrett, his rueful lyrics cry out like a brother's anguish. "Remember when you were young/you shone like the sun," he recalls, but then adds "you reached for the secret too soon/you cried for the moon." Helplessly we can only sympathize from afar as Roger pleads for his dear friend to return. "Come on you raver/you seer of visions/come on you painter/you piper/you prisoner/and shine!" he calls out in vain. As if in response and out of nowhere appears the refreshing saxophone of guest Dick Parry to provide a shred of hope in the end.

How appropriate to go from the soulful, natural sound of a sax to the industrial, synthesized noises of a faceless mechanism at the start of "Welcome to the Machine." In the first of a one-two punch describing the fallout resulting from the instant elevation of the group from cult status to worldwide superstars due to the indescribable success of "Dark Side of the Moon," Waters doesn't hold back his bitterness. Wright performs his best keyboard work ever as he weaves a tight tapestry of synthesizers while Gilmour's full 12-string acoustic guitar strums provide depth and a glimpse of humanity to the proceedings. Roger warns us to be careful of what we strive for because we may not like what we get. "You dreamed of a big star/he played a mean guitar/he always ate in the steak bar/he loved to drive in his Jaguar/so welcome to the machine," he mourns as he contemplates his empty rewards. The tune finishes abruptly and without emotion as if the machine has said "Okay, enough of that," followed by surreal, canned crowd sounds.

But the biggest dose of stark reality comes in the form of "Have a Cigar," Waters' scathing indictment of the mogul-run, greed-propelled and bloated record biz of the seventies. Here David's piercing, staccato guitar jabs are at once unnerving and intriguing as they drive home the anger and frustration spewing out of their predicament. After years and years of being treated like strange, bohemian vagabonds they are suddenly being honored like royalty simply because they made the bigwigs millions of bucks and the transparent hypocrisy of those bosses is disgusting. In the words of the fat cats, "We're just knocked out/we heard about the sell out/you gotta get an album out/you owe it to the people/we're so happy we can hardly count!" Waters relates while spitting out bile. "Everybody else is just green/have you seen the chart?/it's a hell of a start/it could be made into a monster/if we all pull together as a team." It's crystal clear that the band wants no ticket to ride on their gravy train but signed contracts have a way of binding regardless of personal preference and therein lies the rub. Symbolically, the ever-present "machine" cruelly sucks all the life and color out of the song at the end. It's a devastating effect.

Nostalgia for a simpler time is portrayed by the sound of someone twisting the dial of an old AM radio, setting the table for some of the most heartbreaking lyrics in all progdom with "Wish You Were Here." Roger's brilliant poetry about the human condition melded with his remorse over losing touch with his lost compatriot Syd is stunning and poignant. "Did they get you to trade your heroes for ghosts?/hot ashes for trees?/hot air for cool breeze?/cold comfort for change?" he asks plaintively. For those who think that there's no good words to be found in progressive music I offer this tune as proof positive that there are. You just have to know where to look. The music here is basic and unadorned, as it should be, and drifts away into an artificial wind. Magnificence.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 2)" begins with an angry, menacing aura befitting the atmosphere of things expressed so far. Then Gilmour breaks the tension with screaming attacks from his lap steel guitar that are as aggressive and irate as punching a hole in the studio wall. The next thing you know, though, you've got dem ol' cosmic blues again as Roger warbles optimistically "We'll bask in the shadow/of yesterday's triumph/and sail on the steel breeze" as if Barrett's unlikely return would solve everything. "Come on you boy-child/you winner and loser/come on you miner for truth and delusion/and shine!" What a tragedy. But Waters' heartache is juxtaposed by incredible music as Wright's floating Rhodes piano brings in a jazzy feel to the jam-out section that follows. Then, just as you think the moon has set over the horizon, a gorgeous synthesized flute resurrects and leads you into a reassuring coda of sound that is moving and wonderful. Bravo.

While other prog groups have made albums that are arguably just as good, there's no denying that this inspired creation deserves to hover at or near the top of the "best" list for all time to come. It comes as close to perfection as feasible on many levels but, in the end, it is simply a joy to spin and absorb as a whole.

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Send comments to Chicapah (BETA) | Report this review (#158532)
Posted Sunday, January 13, 2008 | Review Permalink
clarke2001
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Honorary Collaborator
4 stars I always had some trouble with Pink Floyd, although I posses their entire discography, I am reluctant to describe myself as a fan. My mixed emotions started at this very point - the album considered a masterpiece by many.

I do not think it's a five star material, but the album is good. Very good. Great. I'm not subtracting the little star(s) from the masterpiece of progressive rock status because I don't think the album is terribly progressive or complex, no; to the hell with that. Have A Cigar and Welcome To The Machine are extraordinary songs. Wish You Were Here is a decent rock song, although not my cup of tea. What about the two main themes? How much are they shining?

The opening one is fine (radio-overplayed though), the closing one is anything but memorable. Of course, similar themes could be re-visited in a conceptual, progressive, serious piece, but this one smells like a filler (not entirely but still).

So much for the songs. What about the album in general? The sound, the atmospheres and Everything Else?

There's that progressiveness issue with the Floyd. Oh How I Hate It, But I Must Push It. You see, as a rock band, they're one of the best (and rightly so, greatest) rock bands in the world. As a prog rock band, they suck giant King Kong's balls while not being worthy to tune the instrument that belongs to ______________(enter your favourite non-Floyd prog artist here).

What kind of stupid statement is that?

Oh boy, it's getting messy. I'm not pushing the childish thing how much X is or is not bearing the tag Y. After all: 1) the majority will disagree with me and b) it's entirely and exclusively MY problem. I am the one who is not able to shift the mood and the impressions that I am perceiving while listening to WYWH (and many other PF albums). That doesn't mean I'm not enjoying it, though. But they were always so INCLINING towards something more that turned out to be only my expectation. Take the keyboards for example: this is Floyd's peak in the career. Putney is so expressive, it could be gorgeous and nasty at the same time! (Putney is an alias for a VCS synthesizer.) But however, something is hollow. At the moments, oh I dare, boring. I won't say what should be added; Pink Floyd have no substitute. But they're not fulfilling my needs with 100 out of 100. Not on this album.

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Send comments to clarke2001 (BETA) | Report this review (#158539)
Posted Sunday, January 13, 2008 | Review Permalink
The Pessimist
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars Well I am now to give my honest opinion: this album ain't really worth the hype in my eyes, I just don't get why it's treated to such glory. Having said that, it is an excellent album. But Floyd have made much better in their career, i.e. Meddle, Dark Side and Animals. Here's a track by track with my honest opinions in consideration:

1. Shine on you crazy diamond (Part 1) - This is without a doubt on of my favourite ever Pink Floyd songs. It is just so perfect! The progression is yet to be topped with such skill, and it warms my heart to oven temperature when the vocals come in. Emotional lyrics also add that extra bit, with some fantastic solos and backing vocals. A wonderful start. 10/10

2. Welcome to the machine - This is where it falls down. I lost interest in this track within about the second minute, making it the weakest track on the album. Personally, I hate it with a passion. 1/10

3. Have a cigar - Now they are back on track. A great classic rock song with an extremely addictive keyboard riff as the main theme. The lyrics are also great as well. 9/10

4. Wish you were here - Boring. I am one to appreciate melody as well, but to me this track just has no colour at all. Then again, I never really was a fan of acoustic numbers. 2/10

5. Shine on you crazy diamond (Part 2) - Now we are talking. Best track on the album, I needn't say much about this track, apart from the fact it's just as brilliant as the first. 10/10

No doubt about it, this is a good album. But i can humbly say that I don't think it's worthy of the Masterpiece title. I hope I didn't offend anyone, but thats how it is.

Overall rating: 32/50 = 3 stars - Good, but non-essential

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Send comments to The Pessimist (BETA) | Report this review (#161954)
Posted Saturday, February 16, 2008 | Review Permalink
3 stars Well, well, so this is one of the two PF albums friends 25 years ago told me were mandatory (the other was Dark Side...). What happened when I finally gave those records some ten spins each was that I came to respect the Floyd, but never loved their music. It is good music, but not more - and that means it's far from being moving, breathtaking, exceptional or overwhelming - IMHO. To put it even more hereticly: the combined 22 minutes of SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND to me are just running, dripping cheese. The same goes for the title track. The only song I can enjoy without reservation is HAVE A CIGAR (musically and lyrically). So, in a superficial way it's a nice record, easy to listen to, lacking depth - and that's the whole secret. It didn't stand the test of time for me - Animals, the follow-up, did. 3 stars.

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Send comments to strayfromatlantis (BETA) | Report this review (#162536)
Posted Sunday, February 24, 2008 | Review Permalink
Queen By-Tor
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars Welcome... to the Pink Floyd Machine...

The first Pink Floyd album I would ever come to own is, and will forever be, my personal favorite by the group. Not the first album I'd heard by the group, this was still the most memorable. From the opening note on the first track I was absolutely hooked. Why? It's darkness and sheer rockability makes it easily accessible to someone such as myself who got into prog through groups like Rush and Dream Theater. Five excellent compositions fill this album with never a dull moment, all losely linked by crazy scenes going on in the ''silence'' between tracks and greatly linked through theme. After Dark Side Of The Moon the pressure was on the band to produce something on the same level and the band simply wished that their old mastermind, Syd Barrett, was still there. Hence the tracks 1, 2, 4 and 5 with the middle song being about the impending success.

Like Dark Side of the Moon, I will never forget the first time I listened to this album. After buying it in a record store which would close down two years later I threw it into the cd player in my mother's car (I didn't have my own yet) on my way to drop my brother off where his band was playing a small gig the next town over. It was a dark night, the highway lit only by the ominous orange street lamps as the first notes of SHINE ON began to play. I was mesmerized... and the rest of the 20 minute drive was filled with complete joy as the crappy speakers pumped out this incredible music. On my way home I would let the album start over again (something I rarely did at that time) just to get the most of this fantastic music.

[okay, onto the actual music]

While it would be completely redundant to break down the album song by song I can still make a few comments about each track. SHINE ON YOU CRAZY DIAMOND in it's 25-something minute entirety bookends the album as it's divided into two pieces. Commercially accessible space rock at its best, this winding epic is the stuff of dreams. A bit of lyrics in the middle of fantastic noodling make this track completely indispensable. WELCOME TO THE MACHINE is where the really hard rock sets in. A concept in itself about the life of a successful rocker, this dark and brooding track is always a favorite. Next up is the track that is often seen as the weakest composition on the album. Really it's just less progressive and more strait forward rock, but HAVE A CIGAR is an excellent track none the less. WISH YOU WERE HERE, the title track, is a terribly emotional ballad for the missing Mr. Barrett. Easy to relate to and very well performed, this is one of Floyd's better known tracks... and for a reason.

Other than saying that it's excellent and you should own it there's not much else to say about the album. It's Floyd at their peak, and most proggers would agree that they exceeded expectations laid on them even after an album like Dark Side of the Moon. On the ironic side of things, apparently an overweight and unrecognizable Syd Barrett would actually show up during the recording process... and would never be seen by the band again afterwards.

One of THE essential prog rock albums as proven by this site and other critics abound. 5 stars... why don't you own this album? Recommended for all.

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Send comments to Queen By-Tor (BETA) | Report this review (#165098)
Posted Thursday, March 27, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars This album is very different from Dark Side. Whereas Dark Side concentrates on experimental sampling, a conceptual focus, short poppier tunes, WYWH concentrates on big anthemic sounds, extended progressive composition, and techical ability. But what they both have in common is the way they create an atmosphere, albeit two very different atmospheres.

'Shine on You Crazy Diamond Part 1' is a perfect opene with its clean guitars and synths, and the vocal section is totally beautiful. This whole piece soars. Gilmour's talent on guitar always lied in his ability to create a mood, rather than technicality, and this fits the bill perfectly. Just... wonderful. 'Welcome to the Machine' contrasts by being as mechanical as possible. Acoustic rythm guitar is brely audible because of the dark oppressive synths. The lyrics are truly haunting, and as time progresses become more and more relevant. 'Have a Cigar' falls short of the mark a bit, and the vocal by Roy Harper doesn't quite cut it. The lyrics are good though, deliberately riddled with cliches sung from the point of view of the music business. 'Wsh You Were Here' is a great anthem/ballad. I think this one (and the two shine on songs) are written for Barret. This one's beautiful and a great singalong. 'Shine on You Crazy Diamond Part 2' is not so good as part 1, but still amazing. This one's more synth driven, whereas the other was full of clean guitar. The lyrics of both parts are wonderful, and could have been written about several influential people in my life.

I set out wanting to rate this album a four, but I just have to go 5. At first I thought the album was cold and unemotional, but now I realise that it can be very warm if you are willing to make the effort to uncover the jewels (or diamonds). Five well deserved stars.

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Send comments to burtonrulez (BETA) | Report this review (#165710)
Posted Friday, April 04, 2008 | Review Permalink
ClemofNazareth
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Prog Folk Researcher
3 stars This is one of those albums where I’ve never quite understood how it came to be so revered among progheads (and potheads, but on that count the attraction is a bit more apparent). This one hit me mid- stride, sandwiched between the pubescent awakening that ‘Dark Side of the Moon’ brought and the multimedia teenage experience of a hundred midnight movie showings of ‘The Wall’. Compared to these ‘Wish You Were Here’ struck me in my teen years as sort of a mellow psych album with punk lyrical sentiments. It was probably better than the majority of prog albums released that year. But I was a young teenager and frankly Patti Smith’s ‘Horses’ and even Queen’s ‘A Night at the Opera’ blew me away a lot more than this one did at the time, and I have to say that it hasn’t aged as well as Dark Side or even ‘Animals’ (although neither did Patti Smith, but that’s another story). Just my opinion, but it’s my review so that’s the opinion that matters at the moment.

All the stoned kids were totally tripped out on the long, meandering saxophone and lazy keyboard forays, but for me Gilmour’s guitar work wasn’t nearly as amazing as on Dark Side. For the most part he was just playing a rather unexceptional form of the blues behind Waters’ tortured vocals lamenting whatever his problem was back then. And his weird, almost country lead-in to the title track seemed really out-of-place then and even now.

The fact seemed to escape most listeners that the nearly forty-five minute album contained only about 600 words of vocals (this review is longer than that), and the instrumental parts made up more than a half-hour of the music. This would be okay if the music were really complex or stimulating, but really the band seemed to have made this record simply to give potheads something to listen to while they cleaned their stash on the album cover. I wonder how many original pressings have tar stains and roach burns on their back covers?

It probably didn’t help that I had the 8-track version though, which was exceptionally muddled with tape hiss and had those annoying fadeouts and head clicks that appeared right in the middle of songs for every track. It’s really amazing those damn things lasted as long as they did, and it’s hard to feel too sorry for the music industry considering the hundreds of millions of dollars they made off that archaic technology.

The other odd thing is that my favorite track (“Have a Cigar”) wasn’t even sung by a member of the band. That always seemed very strange to me for a band that really didn’t have a history of that sort of thing. But then again, that one had a track click in the middle of it too and it wasn’t until I saw a vinyl version much later that I realized the end of track two and the beginning of track three were supposed to be one song. Makes a lot more sense when you here the thing on CD now.

But when EMI remastered the thing I bought it like everyone else, although mostly just because I didn’t have the 8-track anymore (or my original Submariner issue #1 or my Joe Namath football card) thanks to my parents’ ambitious summer garage sales. I’ve played the CD a number of times the past few weeks – not sure why, just for nostalgia’s sake I suppose, but it still doesn’t do much for me. Maybe some day I’ll throw it on and some faded memory will come around like a flashback and get me all excited, but I doubt it. I certainly understand people who grew up on Floyd would put this one up their on their favorites list if they find themselves reminiscing about memories of when they discovered it, but for me there’s no way this is a five star album. I’d almost give it four stars because it’s as good as other albums I’ve given four stars to. But then again the bar should be a lot higher for these guys because of what they showed they were capable of back then, and seven months in the studio should have been enough time for them to put together something that would knock my tonsils into my toes. But this album doesn’t do that, so I’ll go with three stars and just assume I must have missed something somewhere along the way. Oh well.

peace

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Send comments to ClemofNazareth (BETA) | Report this review (#167121)
Posted Monday, April 14, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars If Dark Side of the Moon is number 1, than Wish You Were Here is 1A. Another album of sheer brilliance but unlike many other groups who have just had its commercial breakthrough, the Floyd do not create a follow-up that is basically the same. Unlike its predecessor which moves from one track to another with a controlled, manic energy and an army of special effects, WYWH mostly moves at a more leisurely pace. It has two tracks over 12 minutes in length (Shine On You Crazy Diamond parts 1-5 and part 6-9) that bookend the album and take their time in releasing it's beauty as the individual parts of the tracks stroll from many different types of music (prog, jazz/fusion, pop/rock and dare I say even new age, but way before the term existed). Like DSotM and most all of the Floyd catalog, the impeccable production and the space between the notes allow the listener to revel in every note, but no better was it done then here.

Again, there are no weak tracks here. Have a Cigar is a pretty straight ahead mid-tempo rocker with some outstanding guitar work from Gilmour. Welcome to the Machine is a mechanical, scifi-ish where Richard Wright's keyboards dominate a song were Waters tees off on the record business. The title track is part ode to their lost former leader, Syd Barrett, and with imagery and undercurrent of Waters pessimistic view.

Wish You Were Here has a perfect balance of outstanding music and lyrics. This would be the last album that Pink Floyd would make as full semi-democratic band, as Rick Wright would have greatly decreased input into Animals and The Wall.

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Send comments to tdfloyd (BETA) | Report this review (#167133)
Posted Tuesday, April 15, 2008 | Review Permalink
Sinusoid
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars Pink Floyd are different than most of the other well-known prog rock bands because their music sounds much simpler than the other prog stalwarts. Yet, Pink Floyd always found ways to put subtle complexities in their music, whether you could pick it out or not. WISH YOU WERE HERE is an apex in Pink Floyd's classic string of albums, and it's not hard to hear why.

''Shine On You Crazy Diamond'' is essentially one idea that is varied in nine movements. Most of the differences involve dynamic changes or a different instrument would solo. Part I is nothing more than a drone, but it's worth sitting through to hear the remaining eight sections. Other than that, Waters's vocals are painful to sit through and the music can sound sedated. But the funky jams of Parts VI and VIII are too good to pass up.

Three other songs complete WISH YOU WERE HERE. They're all shorter and easier to digest aside from the creepy, eerie ''Welcome to the Machine''. The title track is a slightly weak acoustic ballad and ''Have a Cigar'' is a rather unusual funk-rock track, and I say unusual because it's on a Pink Floyd album (with Roy Harper on lead vocals).

It's a softer, simpler approach to progressive rock that is an excellent springboard for those unsure if they like prog rock.

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Send comments to Sinusoid (BETA) | Report this review (#168843)
Posted Sunday, April 27, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars 5 stars , with no doubt!

I've always had this inner debate regarding Pink Floyd: I can't decide which of their albums is the most essential. Dark Side Of The Moon might very well be the most common choice throughout Floyd fans, but to me, this album's got something special (besides of being a masterpiece album released after a masterpiece album). Maybe it's the use of excellent technology (at that time), the great amount of feeling regarding both music and concept, the cynic view of the music industry, etc...

This album is a tribute to former Floyd member Syd Barrett, and what a tribute this is ! Here goes a brief musical description:

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part I) : this song starts with synthetizer, hammond organ and some discarded sounds from unfinished work Household Objects, followed by a moving minimoog provided by Richard WRIGHT. Then David GILMOUR plays a clean-reverb guitar solo. After a while (and a light fadeout) we listen a four-note theme (known as Syd's theme) and we hear the start of Nick MASON 's drumming, another GILMOUR solo and then Wright's excellent minimoog melodies. A third solo from Gilmour will lead us to the vocals in this song, performed mainly by Roger WATERS, with some backing vocals. After the singing, Dick PARRY starts playing his sax solos, and after a while the song fades out and links to the next one.

Welcome To The Machine: stars with some synths sounds that serve as the rhythm of the song, since there is no actual drumming in it. Vocals again by WATERS. WRIGHT 's synth takes a prominent role in this song. After all of the electric soloing in this song, music fades out and we can listen to some samples that will lead to the next song.

Have A Cigar: starts whit a nice theme in guitar that is the base of the whole song, also we can listen a melody theme in synth that will be played between some verses and back to back with the guitar solos in the end of the song. Excellent vocals by guest Roy HARPER. Some good solos from GILMOUR, then more sound samples that will lead to the next song.

Wish You Were Here: some radio-like samples lead to an acoustic guitar theme, that later on will lead to GILMOUR warm vocals. After some verses, drums, piano and bass get in the song. Some GILMOUR guitar solos backed by a falsetto voice that gives a nice sound to it. After this moving song we listen some sound effects that will lead us to the second part of Shine On You Crazy Diamond.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part II): after some sound effects, a bass pattern is played, followed by a synth solo by WRIGHT, some guitar chords now and then as the music gets more intense and a lap steel guitar solo will be added to the song. After all this intense music, we hear vocals again. After that some nice music with two bass guitars, with a disco-like guitar, and nice synth sound underneath; after a while this section fades out and we listen a more mellow part, lead by a moving minimoog melody that eventually would lead to the end of the song in which a portion of the melody of See Emily Play can be heard.

And so ends this awesome album. Both a tribute to Syd Barrett and a critic to music industry. A modern music achievement and a must have for anyone that likes good music.

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Send comments to jetson (BETA) | Report this review (#169877)
Posted Sunday, May 04, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars Quite possible the BEST ALBUM EVER made by any band.

Seriously I think it might be. Every time someone ask me what is your favorite album/s this one is always a first choice. As we all know it's always a hard call to deside which album is your favorite as it always depends on your mood etc.

Where to start... lets start with the structure of this album. This album flows really well. It's like this album was meant for one day to be on a audio format that could play the album in it's entirety because it works so well. Just like Animals (just flipping the short and long songs around) I really like this way of putting an album together. It keeps one interested and the fact that all the tracks are so musically different, but still keep a deep connection with each other is totally awesome.

The fact that this is album followed DSOTM is a pretty big plus in my book as well, especially if you look at what it turned out to be. It is very different to the monster hit they made before it and huge amount of respect for that. They could easily have skimmed the cream, but they chose not to... that is truly artistic integrity.

Well let's go on with the production side of this amazing album. It might also be one of the best produced and mixed albums in the history of music. The different levels of this album is breathtaking at points. The very low mixing (as they also did and succeed on The Wall) is just superb. Examples of this: When the drums for the first time enters SOYCD, the keyboard solos in WTTM and the ending of HAC. The production fits the songwriting very well and the structure of the whole album. From the beginning sounds of the almost goofy like keyboard whale thing and the wet-finger class tones to the last fade out keyboard line.

And the whole Syd Barrett aspect of this album is also very interesting. This had a huge impact on the Floyd guys and you can clearly hear it in the mood of this album. And the fact that Roger was writing these lyrics about/for Syd it must have been a pretty scarry experience to suddenly meet him again after all these years. You can clearly hear the extra amount of feeling in Roger's vocals on this album and I really believe that we can thank Syd and his visit at the studio for that. And I really think that this Syd factor or what ever I call it, is the main reason for this album being so special over all and it being in the top of my all time favorite albums... it has something that no other albums have.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pt. 1 ... has the best opening of any song ever. This is just pure magic and it is one of rock guitar's finest moments. Also some nice keyboard melodies/soloes by Rick. The vocal line is so beatiful and heartfelt by Roger it really can make one cry. The lyrics are perfect for the mood and they are really well writting. Well I guess it is one of the more famous lyrics of rock music and I think that is fair. A great saxophone solo and some more great guitar & keyboard melody/soloing going on.

Welcome To The Machine One of Gilmour's best vocal performances ever. The use of mechanic sounds on this song is really frightening. Some really organic guitar playing combined with those sounds and Gilmour's vocals make those verses so unique and I have never heard anything like that before or since. Also great lyrics... very childlike at times and you might wonder, but they fit perfectly in the concept of the album. And then there is the keyboard solo = Holy something - it really works thanks to the great production and mixing skills otherwise it would not have been so effectfull.

Have A Cigar The album rocker. Well writting, well played exspecially Gilmour and Mason are slaying on this track. Nice lyrics again and I always get a smile on my face hearing those lyrics... brilliant. And Roy Harper does a great job on the vocals. Great keyboard work and a great guitar solo. One of Floyds more rocking songs and it fits perfectly in the structure of the album.

Wish You Were Here The ballad of the album. Truly beautiful guitar work, melody line and lyrics. This song is perfect if you really wanna cry your heart out if someone you knew died or something. This song also features Gilmour on lead vocals and he is doing a fantastic job. I think this song beside all of Gilmour's famous soloes is his trademark in the music world. He could do so many other great things, but this emotional playing and singing he was/is in a class higher above most other artist.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond Pt. 2 I do prefer part 1 over this one, but that is alone because of the intro. Otherwise this part continues where the other left. Only one verse, but there are some more experimentation going on in this part and that is nice to hear. Really nothing more to say beside it being a great piece of work and it all ends on a very nice way.

So all in all this album is absolutely flawless in my book. The songwriting, the mood, the playing, the production/mixing it is all perfect. The artwork is also amazing. Perhaps not as famous as the prism, the wall or the pig (due to them being more simple I guess), but still up there as one of the more famous album covers in rock history. This album is Gilmour and Writh's favorite Floyd album and I totally agree :-D

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Send comments to Devnoy (BETA) | Report this review (#170140)
Posted Wednesday, May 07, 2008 | Review Permalink
fuxi
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars I heard the old man tell his tale!

When WISH YOU WERE HERE came out, its predecessor had already acquired classic status, and critics moaned that Pink Floyd's new album was not on the same exalted level. If you look at today's Progarchives ratings, WISH YOU WERE HERE has reached an amazing level of popularity. Still, I think I'll go along with those early critics and state that, purely as a collection of songs, WISH YOU WERE HERE is much less distinguished than THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON.

Sure, 'Welcome to the Machine' and 'Have a Cigar' are fine, cynical tunes, but they lack both the urgency and the formal perfection of the vocal tracks on THE DARK SIDE. Songs like 'Time' or 'Us and Them' could only have been written and performed by the Floyd at their best. 'Machine' and 'Cigar' could have come from any half-decent band. Even the vocal parts of 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond' (well-intended though they may be) sound more forced, less spontaneous and less majestic than their counterparts on THE DARK SIDE.

What we are left with is the title tune, 'Wish You Were Here' itself, one of the most moving songs in the entire Pink Floyd canon; and the album's instrumental bits. Dave Gilmour's guitar solos are superb: some of the most beautiful and most influential in prog; and I have always loved Dick Parry's sax solo. Rick Wright's contributions on keyboards are less distinguished. I must admit I rarely play this album until the end.

So what shall we say? An essential masterpiece? Not quite. Non-essential? No, that's too harsh; this is definitely an album you need to know. In spite of its flaws, let's give WISH YOU WERE HERE four stars.

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Send comments to fuxi (BETA) | Report this review (#171820)
Posted Wednesday, May 21, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars For me the best album of Floyd,marked by very homogeneous titles which go perfectly together,these improvised guitar solos that only guilmour can do and naturally this style very gliding so a lot in pink floyd.

Shine on your crazy diamond (1st version):Areas very gliding,which submerge you right away in the album.A little intro by Wright in the keyboard and some notes of guitar later you here is already on the moon. The piece is very slow,as at a slower pace,which gives this style very airplane.The guitar wakes up progressively,then come voice has Waters,very calm. To finish a party in the saxophone which goes up progressively,the rhythm accelerate,the low becomes more powerful.The saxophone flies off and lose in airs...

Welcome to the machine:A piece nothing quite as evocative title of the faintness of the era,new technologies and new society.Rather heavy, dark and serious has the time,quite varied instrumentaly (lift, people who speak) and with a lot of electronic sounds including the solo synthesizer after we hear singing.

Have a cigar:Solos of guitar always so splendid,the synthesizer is meant once again in this piece but this is less than in the previous and lyrics,rather searched.

Wish you were here:This piece rings very far west, a horse who neighs, a calm,peaceful title. One hear one hear the wind which blows towards the end of the piece and that they find over the beginning of the following piece.

Shine on your crazy diamond (2nd version):This version is less slowly than the first,it put less time to put in place,the sounds are very repetitive,they want insistants.sounds are very penetrating and then,this blow of rope which announces the party in the guitar which always gives me this stupid smile :-) Roger begins to sing the song and then continues on a very jazz party,with keyboard and bass.Then the piece puts on has rack, to be delirious to leave in every direction, all that regulated by a synthesizer which does not finish it any more. Finally they have a very weary sound to mark the end of the piece which is meant to be rather sad as for indeed one of the last true album that pink floyd will have made.

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Send comments to Legionnary (BETA) | Report this review (#171831)
Posted Wednesday, May 21, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars One of the first prog albums that I heard, and probably one of the best ones. Many people (Prog Archives, for instance) agree in considering it an essential album. Is it Pink Floyd's best album? Probably. The five (really, four) songs in it are completely amazing, a prodigy of melody, ambients and feelings. A lesson of know-how. An example of how progressive and complex music can also be accesible.

The album starts with the first part of Shine On You Crazy Diamond. A long, melancholic song, which advances in crescendo, starting with some low keyboards and David Gilmour's unique guitar in a slow and kind of mysterious mood. As the song grows, it starts a simple and catchy guitar riff and some guitar and saxophone solos. When they finish, the vocals start. Sad vocals. Sad lyrics. The song, and the whole album is dedicated to Syd Barret, the former Pink Floyd's leader, devastated by drugs and madness. So it isn't a happy topic. The song continues growing, with a memorable chorus and some more amazing solos.

The second song is a really bizarre song. Welcome To The Machine, an explicit title for a song dedicated to our industrial society and to the musical industry in particular. I don't know exactly how to define this song, as the instrumentation is completely odd, based in some guitar chords played in upstrokes, and the sound of steam going out from a machine. Even the vocals are odd. But it does not mean that the song is not good. It's a great song. Probably, the most complex one in the album, and not so catchy, but it's great on it's own way. As it finishes with a machine noise, the next song starts.

Have a Cigar is a rocker song, the most rocker in the album. Another good guitar work (can Gilmour do a bad work anytime?) and another not-so-catchy song. It's also a complicated song, a great addition to the album.

Wish You Were Here is the most well-known song in this album and, in my humble opinion, one of the most beautiful songs in the word. A low intro, mixed with radio noises, a gorgeous solo and some acoustic verses, until the band enters to help with the song. Another beautiful solo and a totally catchy, epic, melancholic chorus. Whoever hears this song anytime, he'll remember it forever.

The album closes with the second part of Shine On You..., a perfect ending to an album like this, a twelve-minute song, almost intrumental, with few lyrics and recognisable riffs. A slow, dark song. A nice form of concluding a masterpiece of music history, one of the best (if not the best) Pink Floyd's albums and preobably my favourite album alltime.

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Send comments to Blackdog (BETA) | Report this review (#174136)
Posted Monday, June 16, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars Another excellent album from PF. It is bookended by Shine On You Crazy Diamond, which I find to be slightly overrated, although it is still quite good. It has some rocking solos from Gilmour, great vocals, and great saxophone. Normally, I do not like the saxophone, but this is an exception. The second track is the really dark sounding acoustic guitar/synth piece 'Welcome to the Machine' which has some of PF's best vocals ever. Then comes Have A Cigar, a great bluesy rocker, with some nifty synth riffs. It also features great vocals from Roy Harper. NIce solo too. Then comes the great title track. Featuring infamous acoustic guitar riffs and great vocals from Gilmour. Nice acoustic guitar solos too. Then it ends with Shine on You Crazy Diamond, which I have already reviewed. So this album is pretty much all great. The high points are: ALL SONGS.

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Send comments to Linus (BETA) | Report this review (#174961)
Posted Monday, June 23, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd's secound trick

This is Pink Floyd's secound very successful album. I think that it is a little bit weaker than Dark Side of the Moon but it is still a gem of progressive rock. You must only own two Floyd records. The Dark side of the Moon and Wish you were here. After this album Roger Waters took control over the band. Therefore, I like Animals and the Wall not so much like the previous albums. The cover is great, the music for sure and the lyrics as usual. Wish you were here is Pink Floyd's most varied album. You have a great spacy, epic song (Shine on you crazy diamond), another nice Space Rock song (Welcome to the machine), a little bluesy song (Have a cigar) and a folk ballad (Wish you were here).

All in all, this will be an important album in your collection.

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Send comments to Priamus (BETA) | Report this review (#175740)
Posted Sunday, June 29, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars Probably one of the best all-around albums of the 70s, Wish You Were Here is exceptional at every level. This is Floyd at their pinnacle of musicianship and composition, and before Waters turned the band into a cynical beast. Here, the band still has the optimal balance of influence that one sees in Dark Side of the Moon, but more sophistication and skill. This should be the centerpiece of any 70s progressive rock collection.

This album also contains Gilmour's best guitar work. He was probably at his best technically, but he was given the room to develop solos melodically and thematically. I've been playing bluesy guitar for 20 years, and I still can't duplicate the perfection of his vibrato. Of particular note are the intro solo to Shine on You Crazy Diamond, part I and one of the all time best slide solos on Shine on You Crazy Diamond, part V. There are plenty who play guitar faster, but not to create mood and climax like Gilmour. It's the attention to detail that's stunning: rather than playing more notes in less time, the direction rock guitar has generally gone, Gilmour crafts every note, and nowhere is it more evidence that WYWH.

Only the slightest criticism: Roger Waters was never the best vocalist, even though he was a stupendous lyricist. For the most part, Gilmour was a better vocalist, as was evident on DSotM. In my opinion, this is the only thing that keeps it from being the perfect record.

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Send comments to Wormboy (BETA) | Report this review (#177038)
Posted Wednesday, July 16, 2008 | Review Permalink
poslednijat_colobar
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars oh...Wish You Were Here!I think the favourite album of Richard Wright and David Gilmour is one of the things that turn the music into magic.It's not just perfect in musical terms,but it's unique.The musical structure is completely different from everything I've heard.It's only little close to some others Pink Floyd's albums.It's also the last work that all four members contribute to the album significant...and it's seen!The technical and lyrical aspects of the album are of highest standard.The genres' mixture of blues,space,electronic converted the album to progressive monster of all time.I think everyone can feel the spirit of the missing genius - Syd Barrett!

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Send comments to poslednijat_colobar (BETA) | Report this review (#177811)
Posted Tuesday, July 22, 2008 | Review Permalink
4 stars Oh man, absolutely beautiful Pink Floyd work. This is some of the best music I have ever heard. I absolutely love all the atmospherics on this album, and every single track here has a different one. Wonderful, just wonderful.

First off, both of the Shine on you Crazy Diamond tracks are two of the most beautiful pieces of music ever recorded. It goes from beautiful synthesizer background atmospherics to a slow jazz-influenced guitar groove. And all of it is stunning. This track alone is worth getting this album.

While SOYCD was beautiful,Welcome to the Machine is dark an haunting. On this track, Pink Floyd experiments with different synthesizer sounds and atmospheres. This song would be great if they had just trimmed the length on this one down a bit. The fact that it goes on too long is the only reason that this isn't a 5 star album.

Have a Cigar is the song where the standard instruments all come together to make a rock song on the album. It's a funky piece, and the rhythms are perfect for the mood. The synthesizers are also killer, and it ends on a really cool solo.

Wish You Were Here is a great acoustic ballad. It's a wonderful song, and the vocals and the guitar evoke a great down to earth sound. Another five star song.

Again, this album is definetely a good one to get. I would reccomend it to any fan of prog rock, especially the ones who appreciate a good atmosphere.

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Send comments to topofsm (BETA) | Report this review (#180583)
Posted Friday, August 22, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars One of the greatest albums of all by the Greatest Prog band ever!!! (ok - slight bias here) I am trying to review lesser known albums instead of the well known ones... but I had to do this one. This is a fantastic album, as with all Floyd, I can still listen to them even for the millionth time. All the tracks are standouts - no filler here. The album was written mostly by Roger Waters about the ex-Floyd member Syd Barrett, and how fame & drugs contributed to his breakdown. I'm not going to say too much about the album as there is not much that hasn't been said already.

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Send comments to mathew (BETA) | Report this review (#182783)
Posted Thursday, September 18, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here is as close to absolute musical perfection as an album can get. Never before has an album supplied such a euphoric atmosphere. Shine on You Crazy Diamond (Part 1) Probably the best song on the album, although choosing can be incredibly difficult. This is the apotheosis of cosmic space rock. It is a testament to the then facilitated Syd Barrett, and there will never be a song as sentimentally beautiful as this.

Welcome to the Machine One of Pink Floyd's all time darkest moments, the band attacks the music industry that apperantly drove Floyd's original mastermind Syd to the gates of dawn. A very powerful and touching song.

Have A Cigar Seldom is the low point of an album of this caliber. Roy Harper delivers an outstanding vocal performance as the heartless producer that stereotypes accurately the agents behind the stars.

Wish You Were Here A true Floyd Classic. Enough said.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Part 2) A continuation of the first song on WYWH, Part 2 is the perfect closer for the perfect album.

Wish You Were Here is everything that progressive music should be.

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Send comments to AZATHOT777 (BETA) | Report this review (#183882)
Posted Saturday, September 27, 2008 | Review Permalink
The T
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
5 stars This is probably PINK FLOYD's most acclaimed album here on PA. I think it's a masterpiece, but a flawed one.

And the flaw, in my view, is that the record, while stupendous when heard all at once, can seem a little bit fractured when individual songs are selected, especially in the case of the two parts of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond". I'll explain myself near the end.

On the other hand, the music is still magnificent, with moments of real magic, in part thanks to the even freer guitar of David Gilmour, which now has more time to take us to other realities with its constant amazing solos. In general, the psychedelic factor has been taken up a notch, with a song like "Welcome to the Machine" that is a complete exercise in atmospherics and mental-alienation, with little-or-no rock in it but a lot of electronic sounds.

At the same time, PINK FLOYD dares to include a proper radio-friendly track this time around. "Money" and everything in "Dark Side of the Moon" became popular in spite of its odd-time signature or ultra- psychedelic sound; here, the title-track is just ready, was born to be a hit.

"Shine on you Crazy Diamond - Part 1" (9.5/10) is a fantastic track, featuring some of the greatest guitar work by Gilmour. I particularly love the fact that the actual sung-part of the song arrives very late into it, preceded by some of the best music in all prog, in an opening that would be imitated countless times, but as I've said before in PINK FLOYD reviews, never equaled.

"Welcome to the Machine" (9.5/10) is another brilliant track. As noticed earlier, the rock element is all but missing here, replaced by a musical tale of a world which is a machine, where feelings are dead and cold iron is thriving; a very narcotic track, is one of the best of its kind.

"Have a cigar" (9/10) used to be my least-favorite but now I can see the great music on it. The riff that gives the track its main shape is pure psychedelic bliss, all the way through its irregular ending notes. The vocals by Harper fit the PINK FLOYD style perfectly. Fantastic song.

"Wish you were here" (8/10) is the best-known track in the album and, with the exception of "Another Brick in the Wall Pt II", in all PINK FLOYD. I think it's a good melodic track but it's nothing to really write home about. Maybe it's the fact that I've heard so many awful (and not awful) bands cover this track that I've realized how mundane it can really be. The guitar work as always shines, but I've heard better songs in this style before. If anything, at least it fits in this ever-changing record semi-nicely.

"Shine on you Crazy Diamond - Part 2" (8.5/10) The conclusion to the saga is not as successful as the beginning. One of the best things about the first part was the gradual build-up towards the vocal part; in part 2 everything happens more quickly and with less effect.

And there's where I find a flaw in this record. If one listens to it from start to finish, everything clicks, "Part 1" and "Part 2" make absolute sense and its original, unique positioning in the album fit perfectly. Many bands, again, have created epics divided in two parts with this same approach: the first part at the beginning of the record, the second one at the end. And, for a change, I think that in this case some bands have actually improved upon a structure that PINK FLOYD built, because here in "Wish you Were Here" it gets difficult to appreciate any of the two tracks (especially the second one) without listening to the entire album first. As individual songs, especially "Part 2" doesn't work. I know: art-rock albums are meant to be appreciated as a whole, but then again, this is the very-rare case where others seem to have perfected the job.

This is not a major complain, though, and while I'd say that the average rating of the album is a little bit lower than that of "Dark Side of the Moon", some of the best moments in "Wish you Were Here" reach actually higher places, and it's just impossible to deny it the status as a masterpiece, worthy of 5 stars.

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Send comments to The T (BETA) | Report this review (#185042)
Posted Wednesday, October 08, 2008 | Review Permalink
AtomicCrimsonRush
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Symphonic Team
5 stars Enduring, masterful, powerful, unforgettable.

Wish You Were Here is one of the greatest prog albums of 1975 which seems to be the pinnacle for the golden era of prog, culminating in the artists best work. PF had released their master work DSOTM that stormed the prog world and remains one of the finest albums in the history of rock. How do you follow up on this success? A conceptual album with one of the most endearing songs of the PF canon and one of the most celebrated album covers of all time - Wish You Were Here.

These albums have left an indelible thumbprint for other artists to try and emulate. Wish You Were Here accomplished the monumental task of following up DSOTM with an incredible lengthy introduction preparing the listener for what is to come. The tranquility conveyed on "Shine On" is astounding and so aptly performed live with exquisite visual imagery. The track opens with a patient, ambience created by sounds of a peaceful stream, a rowing boat, and the distinct keyboard talents of Wright. The music takes us downstream as we enter Syd Barret's jaded conscious thoughts, echoed by the band members themselves. The track is an ode to the twisted genius of Syd and moves through several sections as a multi movement suite orchestrated to perfection. The echoing guitar represents a four octave motif that Floydians have grown to adore. Its pure beauty is complimented when Gilmour chimes in "Remember when you were young..." The fragmentation of the beat midway through alludes to the fragmented status of the group since Barret's departure. Indeed this is a beatific paean to the troubled artist who recently travelled to "the great gig in the sky".

"Welcome to the Machine" begins with the mechanized droning of a factory machine, and seems to be a more blatant stab at autocratic society than anything on "Animals" or "the Wall" where humans are forced to obey only to be grinded out as mincemeat; mindless autonomyns. The theme is simple and runs through most PF albums: Absence of a band member has led to success but at what price? The music business is likened to a meat processor, similar to the one in "The Wall" movie. They are grinded out under the pressure of the education system. In "Machine" the music industry processes and manufactures rock artists for their own means, but when they have fulfilled their purpose, the naïve artists are chewed up and spat out to make room for 'the next big thing'. The golden mechanized glove on the cover echoes this thought. The man catches alight as he shakes hands now that his deal with the devil has doomed him to extinction. PF kept attempting to rebel against the golden handshake of the music business, still somehow retaining millions of record sales. This is an achievement in itself. "Have a Cigar" continues this cynical examination of the music business; full of clichés and innuendos, the lyrics stab at the way the industry elevates artists to drain every cent out of them only to destroy them at the first sign of individual innovation. The rotting carcass of the music artist is left in a smoldering heap so that the new talent can rise out of the ashes in its place. PF likely felt like this after the success of DSOTM - suddenly a band that was shunned is sought after by every label. Thankfully PF refused to sell out on this album and it still managed to carve a place on the charts for a number of weeks.

Part of the reason for its success is the single "Wish You Were Here" with one of the most played, most recognized acoustic intros ever. The lyrics are as beautiful as the arrangement. Waters calls to the positive side of his dark nature. There are 2 sides to human nature.

The album closes with another segment of "Shine On" bringing the album full circle. The journey is complete making way for "Animals".

Wish You Were Here is a wonderful album that tends to grow on you with every listen. The album cemented PF's reputation of masters of the prog genre. No PF or prog fan should be without it - it is simply a masterpiece!

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Send comments to AtomicCrimsonRush (BETA) | Report this review (#189022)
Posted Wednesday, November 12, 2008 | Review Permalink
J-Man
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars People keep saying that Dark Side of the Moon is the best Pink Floyd album, but I'm really confused why. It's better than the modern day crap, but compared to Wish You Were Here, no comparison. Dark Side is ruined in some parts because of the sound effects, and even just the music doesn't compare. The opening to the album is the first part of the epic Shine on you Crazy Diamond, and the opening guitar and keyboard solo is one of the best openings ever. The next song is a very Space Rock song Welcome to the Machine. It then progresses into the hard-rocker Have A Cigar. The song contains great singing and I love David Gilmour's sound on this song. We then go into the title track Wish You Were Here. It's a great acoustic song that has a great guitar solo. Last comes the closing to the first track. It's a little repetitive, but is nonetheless, a great finisher to a great album.

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Send comments to J-Man (BETA) | Report this review (#190192)
Posted Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars I'm so glad that this album is rated above Dark Side on this site. I love Dark Side, but this album is just a bit superior in my opinion. The Shine On suite is nothing short of genius, and the best work that Pink Floyd ever created. Wish You Were Here is, of course, a classic song, but my favorite song on the album, besides Shine On, is Have a Cigar. That guitar riff is just so freaking funky and cool. Welcome to the Machine is positively haunting, though maybe just a bit long. The electronic effect noises in the song are just incredible though. I don't know what else to say besides the fact that I think that this is Pink Floyd's best, most polished album, even if it that results in an absence of some of the interesting risk taking that is present in the early Floyd catalog.

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Send comments to evantate09 (BETA) | Report this review (#192100)
Posted Saturday, December 06, 2008 | Review Permalink
Epignosis
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Eclectic Prog Team
3 stars I consider this to be one of the most overrated albums of all time. It's a good effort, with solid songs, and for once, Rick Wright gets to "shine," but I simply fail to see what many people see in this album. The first and fifth tracks epitomize tedium, even though I do enjoy them. In addition, there is nothing especially noteworthy about the three middle songs. The conceptual purpose of the album is twofold: It criticizes the money machine that is the record industry, and it pays tribute to former member Syd Barrett.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Pts. 1-5" For four minutes straight, the first part of a monstrous composition features dense synthesizer and Gilmour bending away at his strings. Gilmour then plays the main riff of the piece. That main riff consists of only four notes, but what a great four notes they are. His bluesy guitar work dominates the song- the singing doesn't come in until after almost nine minutes have elapsed. The vocal work, to include both the tune and lyrics, is the highlight of this album. There is a raunchy saxophone solo, during which Mason changes up the beat.

"Welcome to the Machine" Mechanical noises govern the introduction to this, just before Gilmour strums his acoustic and the singing begins. The music is full of ominous strings, but Wright engages in a rare mini-Moog performance. Overall, the music pumps along mechanically, which works well artistically, but can make it an uncomfortable listen.

"Have a Cigar" This one is driven by dirty guitar, over-the-top synthesizer, and some creative vocal work. Wright mentioned once in an interview that, while the question, "Which one's Pink" sounds like a lame joke, it was a fairly common question. The lyrics are a scathing (and ironic) parody of the record industry. At the end, the lengthy guitar solo suddenly sounds like it's being played on an old transistor radio.

"Wish You Were Here" The segue from the previous song consists of Gilmour changing stations on his car radio. The signature guitar riff is made to sound like it is coming from the radio, and Gilmour's acoustic guitar soloing sounds like someone playing along to it. While, strictly speaking, not progressive rock (it's more of a campfire song, really), this is one of my favorite Pink Floyd pieces. Waters stated in 1975 that this was the only song where the lyrics ever came first in the songwriting process; given the lyric-swamped albums that would come during Waters's dominance of Pink Floyd, I can't help but wonder if this was the last.

"Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Pts. 6-9" The wind noises that drowned out the title track segue into the second half of this musical leviathan. Wright treats us to a wonderful synthesizer performance (I really like his tone here), and just as Mason changes up the beat again, Gilmour goes into a steel guitar solo. The lead instruments scream together for a while before things calm down, and Gilmour plays the vocal melody. After the vocals return, Wright dabbles in some electric piano and clavinet. The song is not unpleasant, but like the first five parts, linger on and just become monotonous.

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Send comments to Epignosis (BETA) | Report this review (#194387)
Posted Friday, December 19, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars Yeah, I know the Progarchives thing warned me to use 0 and 5 stars sparingly, but truly, this album Deserves 5 stars. Because it really is a Masterpiece of the Progressive Rock genre. It's a perfect example of Progressive rock at it's height in the mid seventies.

The song Welcome to the Machine is quite haunting, and features machine sounds, synthesizers, and other cool things. It's unlike any other song ever heard before. Have a Cigar is a pretty average song, but still differs greatly from any other song you've heard before, just one example of how my favourite band can do that! Have a Cigar features Roy Harper on vocals. Wish you Were Here, while not SO progressive, still is a great song to listen to, especially when you feel like hearing a somewhat cheerful tune. It's not exactly cheerful, but it's very catchy, and can make you happy by the sound of the music, or perhaps sad if the lyrics apply to a certain experience in your life.

But for Prog fans, the big thing on the album is without a doubt, Shine on You crazy Diamond. It's an epic, nearly half hour song written for Syd Barrett. The song was too long to be on one side of a record, so they split it into two, but they're really one song, and I often listen to them back to back.

Progressive rock fans look for intricate sounds and stuff different from traditional rock. Well for Shine on You crazy Diamond, try surreal sounding organs, the use of water in wine glasses, quiet guitar solos, a memorable theme referred to as Syd's Theme and extended bluesy guitar jams until the lyrics begin around the 8 minute mark. Then add in a saxophone solo, and after that comes a harder rock part followed by a reprise of the lyrics. After that is an interesting sounding part with a good bass beat followed by a dramatic, slow outro. And at the very VERY end of the song, there is a nod to Syd's early song See Emily Play. if you listen close enough.

I cannot describe Shine on You crazy Diamond very well... but it's VERY AMAZING. This album is a landmark release in the Progressive Rock genre. Seriously. This album is so good, that anyone who is into Prog that hasn't heard it, I say Just go and buy it. Seriously, you won't even have to listen to it first, I can almost guarantee that you will like it if you like Prog. So just go out and buy it. :)

Yes, I DO think that it deserves all 5 stars for a rating, this album is simply amazing.

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Send comments to HammerOfPink (BETA) | Report this review (#194977)
Posted Thursday, December 25, 2008 | Review Permalink
5 stars The star of a 100 lists of Best of all time albums....is WYWH with no doubt regarded by more than only Pink floyd fans as Floys best album. Personally I always prefered Animals as that album...but I cannot deny that WYWH is on par with that one. Not particulary progressive rock, but certainly dreamy spacerock that in that time was called Psychedelic Rock. No matter how you call it, it deserves a place in this list, thats for sure.

I think its one of the few albums from which only the recording is already surrounded by legends. The sudden apperance of Syd Barrett in the studio till the legendary shooting of the album cover (one of Storm Thorgensens best effords). I actually know anyone who travelled to California to find the the lakes that are shown of the cover of this album.

The album is by far the most keyboard oriented album Pink Floyd has made...this is resulting in often very long and spreaded out keyboardparts and therefor I think it can be said that Rick Wright is perhaps the real star of this album.....already right from the beginning they let you have no mestake about that (although by now Gilmour's opening solo is perhaps much more famous) and is the tone for the rest of the album set.

The album basically is beginning with the same song as its ended with...only they cut that song into 2 pieces and added 3 other songs in between that.....Most of the time Shine on is getting the most praise and is often called as one of PF's best songs ever......I cannot deny with that...although I also would like to ask attention for the underdog 'Welcome To The Machine' which is in my eyes the best song of the album....especially the keys on this songs moves in spheres that PF never entered again after this album....unfortunatly I must say. The remaing 2 songs are one straight on and very nice rock song and one liove favorite that now is regarded as one of the most favorable songs to play live that PF ever created and added to every setlist of solo and PF tours (except during the The Wall tour).

For me the album comes on as too soft..and very mellow quite often....particulary due the towering influence of Shine on at the beginning (The way Shine On opens is perhaps the most perfect opening for a live concert) and the end....t lets you dream away to another world....a world of myths and dreams. How different this is during the live performances. WYWH was played in parts already during the tour before the official release of the album, just as pieces that were eventually ending up on Animals, but was not played in its entirety during the Animals Tour 2 years after its release.....PF usually played Animals first then and after that the whole of WYWH..And then usually a few encores, on time more than other times. Particularry the live version of Shine On II was much much better due the extremely extended soloing of David Gilmour. This made Shine On II sometimes clock far over 22 minutes.......(They are captured on several bootlegs of this tour) and over and over it was Gilmour who was on fire during this..........Floyd at the top of its peak....if you ask me.

With the 2002 In The Flesh Tour in Europe, Roger Waters decide to drop What God Wants and The Powers That Be and added Shine On II. This resulted into playing almost the entire WYWH album. (The only song that was missing was Have a Cigar) It was a beautifull rendition of the album even while Shine On II was shorter as on the album, and definatly not as long as during the Animals Tour.....but the effort was apreciated......

Wish You Were with that ends up to be another towering of inspiration. Listen for example to the song The Walls Of Babylon of Pendragon on The Window Of Life or the fact that Transatlantic added Shine On I to the bonus collection of A Bridge Across Forever or played the song completely during their last tour as a final encore from time to time) Beautifull lyrics, dreamcatching and extremely moving and dreamy melodies......it grew out as an album for all time.....

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Send comments to Daniel1974nl (BETA) | Report this review (#199143)
Posted Thursday, January 15, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars You'll fly? No, you won't. You just will know what the Floyd music is. It's a better album; in psychological context. Floyd was struggled over their remebrance about Syd Barrett. This is the album about their way to stepping aside the Barrett's curse. The music is high, I mean, the ranking in versatility is high. And, of course, like I said, this is a full-reviewed music in psychological context. Shine On You Crazy Diamond; Welcome To The Machine; and Wish You Were Here are the interpretation of their under-pressure conditions. So, find it yourself. You'll know just what I mean. And, in the end, we'll accept that the album is nothin' but magnificent.

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Send comments to Geizao (BETA) | Report this review (#199439)
Posted Saturday, January 17, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars My favourite album of all time.

There really isn't that much left to say about this album that no one has said before...

I just felt obliged to chime in with a 5 star review, as in my opinion this is the best album ever made and it deserves no less. This album sparked my interest in our wonderful genre, and despite all the glorious classics that I've discovered since, has never quite been topped. For me, that creates an aura of excellence around this album that I can't even really explain. It's more than just music, it's like some sort of spiritual awakening recorded onto disc.

I'm not going to go into a track-by-track, or explain the virtues of the musicianship because I feel like when it comes to Pink Floyd, the merits of these things kind of go without saying.

So what it boils down to is this: I have heard this album so many times, I can't even estimate how many. At least 50 times a year, for several years on end. And every time I do, it still transports me away and I can't really concentrate on anything else.

That is the highest recommendation I can give. Floyd up your life, people. You won't regret it.

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Send comments to Eapo_q42 (BETA) | Report this review (#199723)
Posted Sunday, January 18, 2009 | Review Permalink
3 stars I will preface this by saying I am by no stretch a fan of Pink Floyd. I don't think they're bad but I also don't think they're good. Their music comes off as bland as a piece of WonderBread.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond starts off with a couple minutes of spacey sounds. Before a few notes of a bluesy-sounding guitar come in. I'm all for taking multiple minutes of uneventful music to build atmosphere but 4 minutes is too long to accomplish nothing. At the 4 minute mark a few notes of a guitar come, indicating the actual song will start soon. Drums and the rest of the band with a very mellow attempt at a climax. All of this is occurs at a slow tempo. The guitar tries to help out a bit with a brief solo that comes across as boring. The slow moving music sets in once again and picks up around 7:30 when the guitar injects a little life into the piece. It goes from slow, quiet and bored to slightly faster and louder yet still bored. I'm not sure what this piece is trying to accomplish and I don't think the members of Pink Floyd were quite sure what they were doing. A very uninspired sax gets to solo around the 11 minute mark for around 45 seconds. It then picks up a little along with the rest of the band and gets a little better but it still doesn't stray out of the realm of mediocrity. There were parts in the final third of this song when I almost felt like I would get pleasure out of continued listening but those feelings were mistaken.

Welcome to the Machine starts out with mechanical sounds amid a spacey background for 50 or so seconds to build atmosphere. It works here as a few chords get strummed on an acoustic guitar to continue to build atmosphere. Haunting vocals enter with some rather disturbing keys getting played every so often. The vocals seem to provide some sort of warning/pleading in contrast to the highly dark sounds of the instruments. Tension builds for the next minute or two with the keyboards and electric guitar doing most of the work. It's all rather subdued and nothing is too complex which is most likely what keeps the mood so depressing. Vocals return with the same background music. The only main change throughout the song is a sense of urgency portrayed by a VERY gradual increase in volume, with nothing noticeable being done to the tempo. The last minute plays sounds of what sounds like an air raid siren replicated via a Moog, followed by some crowd chatter/laughter.

Have a Cigar is, in one word, funky. The guitar provides that funky sound while the bass and drums give it the beat. The keys don't add to the funk at all but they somehow don't seem out of place. Everything in this song goes as it should with a decent guitar solo starting around the 3:30 mark and going on until the end. It's a nice radio-friendly track that I can't say too much about one way or the other.

Wish You Were Here is a slower bluesy anthem carried almost entirely by acoustic guitar and vocals with the rest of the band entering after the first third. Nothing too adventurous here but it is quite nice to listen to.

Will Shine On You Crazy Diamond part 2 prove to be any better than part 1? Yes although that's not too hard to do. It starts off with some wind producing a bunch of static then in comes the bass to set the mood and remind you of where Part 1 left off. Not too long into the song it picks up right where Part 1 ended, albeit in a slower tempo. Things then pick up after 2:30 or so and I'm finally excited by this song. The vocal section returns which is the same as in Part 1 but it actually sounds like it has purpose this time around. The Crazy Diamond has finally found a purpose. Unfortunately this doesn't last for long and the last few minutes drag out as this song ends with a whimper.

If you find that you don't like the general sound of Pink Floyd, you should definitely stay away from this album. If you like PF, then chances are you probably already own this album and my review means nothing. I will recommend this album though because everyone else likes it so I must be wrong.

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Send comments to TheCaptain (BETA) | Report this review (#200223)
Posted Thursday, January 22, 2009 | Review Permalink
SouthSideoftheSky
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Symphonic Team
3 stars Good but heavily overrated

This is another fine album by Pink Floyd but I think it is heavily overrated. I also think that it is not truly a progressive rock album. It was with their next album, Animals, that Pink Floyd would create their first true Prog album. Wish You Were Here is just a very good Psychedelic Rock album. I say this because, though they experiment with different sounds, I think that they do not break away from conventional song structures. Sure, Shine On You Crazy Diamond is very long but it is basically a very long intro followed by a not too unconventional song. Good though it is. Have A Cigar, on the other hand, is a song I have never really been able to enjoy I'm afraid.

Overall, I think this is a good album that you should have in your collection. But it is hardly a masterpiece of progressive music.

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Send comments to SouthSideoftheSky (BETA) | Report this review (#201112)
Posted Friday, January 30, 2009 | Review Permalink
The Sleepwalker
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars This is my review of Pink Floyd's 1975 album Wish You Were Here.

Pink Floyd is probably my all-time favorite band, David's stunning guitar playing, Roger's dark and powerful lyrics, Rick's smooth Keyboard and piano playing, and Nick's typical Floydish drums. The 1973 album Dark Side Of The Moon, probably their best known work, was to me, though being a great album, a bit overrated. The 1975 release Wish You Were Here was just as Dark Side a big hit, millions of copies have been sold. Though Dark Side in the end seems to have got more succes, Wish You Were Here is in my opinion way better. Dark Side Of The Moon was made of relatively short and pretty accesible songs such as Money and Time. Wish You Were Here is made up of only 5 songs, which are harder to get into than most of Dark Side's songs. In this review, I will review each song on it's own, starting of with the first track on the album, Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-II-III-IV-V).

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts I-II-IIV-IV-V): A pretty calm start of the album. This song is together with the title track dedicated to founder Syd Barett. The songs starts of with a quiet, eery synth, wich after a while turns into the first guitar solo of the song. David's guitar playing in this song is amazing, the cool, clean guitar really characterises the song. After the first solo there is the famous four note riff, which you will never forget again once you've heard it. After David's second and third solo's part V starts. The fifth part of the song is made up of a lyrical part and a saxophone solo based on the 4 note riff. The opener of WYWH is fantastic, I have barely heard music that could compete against this amazing piece.

Welcome To The Machine: From Shine on we go to Welcome to the machine, probably the darkest song of the album. This song, together with the next one is about record companies. the power of this song, aside from the lyrics, are in Rick's synth. The last minutes of the song are filled with a powerful synth solo. Welcome To The Machine is a great song, though I can't really compare it to the songs of this album such as Shine On, The real outstanding Floyd songs.

Have A Cigar: Another song about record companies. Have A Cigar is the fastest song of the album, it's also much more accesible than the first two songs, but that doesn't mean it's not a good song. Have A Cigar has been my favorite Pink Floyd song for a long while, the funky riff, the great vocals of Roy Harper and David's guitar solo make this song one of the band's best.

Wish You Were Here: Another Song about Syd Barett,which just as Have A Cigar is a pretty accesible song. I find this one the least good song of the album, it's just not as powerful and epic as the other ones. The song is basically made up out of some chords, with 2 solo's by David Gilmour. The lyrics are pretty good and really show how much the band members miss Syd. All by All not as good compared to the other songs from the album, but still a very nice one.

Shine On You Crazy Diamond (Parts VI-VII-IIX-IX): The Final song of the album. Starts of with some synth wich turns into a slide guitar solo. The slide guitar solo is a very epic one, wich does really brings me shivers. After the solo there are some vocals, not as strong as in part V of Shine On, they also are much shorter than in part V. The rest of the song is pretty much based on Rick's keyboard playing. The minutes this is done are not very exciting, after a while it will get a little bit boring. The Final track is pretty good, though most of the album is better than this.

I find WYWH the best of Pink Floyd, it's definately worth buying!

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Send comments to The Sleepwalker (BETA) | Report this review (#201525)
Posted Tuesday, February 03, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars For a while I had trouble seeing what other people saw in Pink Floyd because the psychedelic elements of their music did not appeal to me. I found Wish You Were Here, however, to be much more accessible and more like non-psychedelic prog. Serious fans of the band may not consider this to be their best album, but for the average progressive rock fan I think it is clearly their best work. The concept of the album is a tribute to the band's former guitarist, Syd Barrett, along with a bit of criticism toward the music industry. The two parts of Shine on are split up at the beginning and end of the album, and these track(s) are the highlight of the album. I love Gilmour's soaring guitar and you can really feel the emotion the members of the band feel for their former partner in the vocals and in the music. Do not expect this album to sound just like Dark Side of the Moon, it is an entirely different style that I find to be much better to prog fans. I know that I am in the minority in not caring for many of Pink Floyd's other works, but I think that this is definitely their best and most progressive output. Normally I would give a recommendation that a new listener should start with this album, but there aren't many people who have never heard anything by pink floyd, so I will say that if you didn't like some of their other works, you need to give this album a shot.

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Send comments to rpe9p (BETA) | Report this review (#207615)
Posted Tuesday, March 17, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars So you think you can tell...

Quite possibly my absolute favorite Pink Floyd album. Here is where they really began to develop into their popularized trademark sound. Each song is a masterpiece of music in general. To the spacey atmosphere of Shine on you Crazy Diamond, to the synth led melancholy of Welcome to the Machine. The simply beautiful and stunning acoustic led title track, which will go down as one of the greatest songs of all time, and the angry funk rock of Have a Cigar. One brilliant album all the way through. The lyrics are biting as much as they are poetic and deep. A tribute of sorts to Syd Barrett, and transcendent of the original ideals.

Progressive and highly emotional. The playing, while not directly technical, is very emotive and evocative. Shine On, is epic, and each part is very memorable, with an airy texture that picks you up and carries you into space. Each song has blistering solos, deep emotional impact, and captivating performance in general.

This album is an absolute musical highlight. 5 stars.

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Send comments to Alitare (BETA) | Report this review (#208881)
Posted Thursday, March 26, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars One of the first records I bought in my life: it was at an outdoor booth at Wembley Market in London. I was on holidays in England and had no turntable to listen to the record. I thus had to wait to be back in Paris, three weeks later, to be able to listen to the record. I remember I spent some hours carefully exploring this incredible sleeve. At last, I was back home and I will never forget the shiver I felt when I listened to "Shine on your crazy diamond" for the first time. It was the best tune I had ever heard and this listening remains vivid in my memory. so long ago...

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Send comments to So long ago (BETA) | Report this review (#212204)
Posted Thursday, April 23, 2009 | Review Permalink
4 stars I am a moderate fan of Pink Floyd. In my mind they are not the greatest band of all time, but are definetly a very talented band and very deserving of the acclaim they have recieved. With that being said I will now delve into my opinion of Wish you Were Here.

I personally enjoy this album quit a bit. Anytime I travel through Los Angeles at night I liston to this album, to me the mood and atmosphere of that album really blends with that area in the night hours.

Shine on you crazy diamond ( part one) has a great opening that really brings you into the music. The lyrics are great and the instrumentation is superb.

Welcome to the machine has a great erie feeling to it, every time I listen to it I feel is if I am in some future distopia where everything is mechnical. I would point to this song as the first real "industrial" music piece.

Have a cigar has a great bass line and catchy lyrics.

Wish you were here is great tune and has some strong lyrics. I've always loved the line, " Did they get you to trade your heroes for ghost?".

Shine on you crazy diamond ( part two) is a great way to close a pretty good album.

Overall Pros: Great lyrics, great technical strength on the instrumentation, nice time signature changes, a very unique atmosphere.

Overall Cons: My only real complaint is this album is to short, only five songs? Even though both parts of shine on are long and great, I still wish this album was a little longer.

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Send comments to TheLastBaron (BETA) | Report this review (#214136)
Posted Wednesday, May 06, 2009 | Review Permalink
4 stars Aside from Richard Wright's awesome work (when he's allowed to), a great saxophone solo at the end of "Shine on You Crazy Diamond (Part One)" (when the song finally gets going), the awesome pedal steel work in the first half of "(Part Two)", the usual interesting, somewhat-clever Pink Floyd incidental, background, and song-spacing noises, and some occasional nice acoustic guitar strums, this album never gets its act together until it's on it's way out. The best song, "Welcome to the Machine" is dissed while, for some god-only-knows reason, the very plain and unexceptional musics of "Have a Cigar" ("By the way, which one's Pink?") and "Wish You Were Here" are universally lauded as rock classics! Where is the progressive gold in this tired Eagles-meets-Lynyrd Skynyrd stuff? While I played this album to death for a couple of months when it first came out, I haven't listened to it since (until right now)-I haven't wanted to. IM(not so humble)O, this album ranks behind Animals, Dark Side of the Moon, The Wall, and Meddle. I believe that, were it not for the maudlin mega-hype for poor Mr. Barrett, this album would never get the kind of reverence it does. Barrett a pitiable genius? Perhaps, but then, if this is the case the Todd (Rundgren) really is God! Robert Wyatt is the Son of, and Steve Wilson and Robert Fripp are taking turns as the Holy Spirit! High three, rounded to four.

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Send comments to BrufordFreak (BETA) | Report this review (#215168)
Posted Tuesday, May 12, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars Running over the same old ground, what have we found? The same old fears.

The point of prog in my opinion, is to make music that is skillfully harder and longer than normal rock. However, i also think that the point of prog is to use that skill and musical prowess to create something from nothing. Pink Floyd is a band, that takes a simple melody, improvises it, extends it, and nails it completely, and the 1975 released album Wish You Were Here is their crowning achivement,.

Not many believed that it could live up to the music of its predecessor, but boy were they wrong. Dark Side of The Moon is an absolute masterpiece but you just can't say anything else about Wish You Were Here. These two albums are in my opinion very similiar, and both inherit the mystical Floydian sound.

There is only a few prog albums that my friends(who listen to mainstream hard rock) have enjoyed on the first listen to the album, that was the case with WYWH because there simply is nothing to dislike on this album. Every tracks are great in their own way, Shine on you crazy diamond is a true epic and landmark for the band, Welcome to the machine is absolutley fantastic because of its psychedelic sound, Have a cigar is to me and always will be one of the best Floyd songs and the title track is a very addicting but beautiful composition.

This is the record to listen to when you open a wine bottle and just want to chill out. Absolutley fantastic stuff. 5 Stars.

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Send comments to paragraph7 (BETA) | Report this review (#220044)
Posted Saturday, June 06, 2009 | Review Permalink
Negoba
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Monolithic Classic of All Rock (Including Prog)

With Wish You Were Here, Pink Floyd did something that few bands have been able to achieve - follow up a perfect, monstrously popular album with contrasting, but still perfect follow-up. While only three songs and a split multi-part epic, this album has no low points, no lulls, no filler. Each song is distinct from the other, but still work together as a coherent whole. This album marks the end of the first David Gilmour - led era, and already Roger Waters is having a larger role in the band than he did before. But in their loving tribute to their fallen brother Syd Barrett, the band really came together to produce a unified sound that they would never quite achieve again.

The epic Shine On You Crazy Diamond is everything you want in space rock, a huge atmospheric creation that transports the listener to another world before building to an explosive chorus. Welcome to the Machine is a menacing keyboard tune showing Waters' growing snarling sarcastic style. The classic title tune is a strummed acoustic break from the intensity. Have a Cigar is a lighter strike at the industry featuring spot on vocals by Roy Harper. In some ways, the album is more like Meddle than Dark Side of the Moon in composition (with Shine analogous to Echoes and WYWH analagous to Fearless). In that way, it feels more like a classic Floyd album than Dark Side or the Wall that are almost stand-alone works.

Probably everyone on this site already has this album memorized. This review serves mainly to speak my opinions that: 1. There can be no doubt this album is a masterpiece. 2. At the same time, it's probably not one of the top 5 or even top 10 Progressive albums, as there are simply other more deserving albums that simultaneously pushed the envelope farther while possessing the same level of excellence. 3. Everyone should simply own the album and then my opinion won't matter so much. It's certainly essential rock n' roll, essential prog, Floyd at their prime, some of their most iconic single songs, and belongs in any serious fan's library.

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Send comments to Negoba (BETA) | Report this review (#221988)
Posted Saturday, June 20, 2009 | Review Permalink
Tarcisio Moura
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars I was surprised that I haven't yet write a review about this magnificent piece of prog music. And since there is already over 700 other people who did, what could I add besides my own opinion and my personal vision of things? At the time it was realeased I remember the critics were not nice. The expectations where enormous, since Dark Side Of The Moon was both a landmark album and sold in phenomenal numbers, becoming one of the ten bestselling albums in rock history. How can you top that?

Answer: you can't. You just move on. And PF did just that. Wish You Were Here was an excellent work in a time everybody was expecting something even more groundbreaking than its precedor. Which was foolish, of course (some press calling it a 'poor' copy fo TDSOTM was not only insulting, but ludicrous). With hindsight we can see that this was a transitional CD, where Roger Waters cynical visons of the real world were beginning to take over the previous lyrics about echoes, time and general lunacy. The music was more solid even if the central piece was something that could easily have been a part of The Dark Side Of The Moon: Shine On You Crazy Diamond is definitly their link with their gloro\ious past as much as Welcome To The Machine and Have A Cigar were a hint of what was to come.

Seen today I still think this is a fantastic job for a band under such big pressures from the public and press,. Besides they changed labels what surely did not help to quiet things down. There are some fantastic guitar work from David Gilmour and some of the most proeminent keyboards ever done by Rick Wright (unfortunatly he would never again have so much room in a PF record). With a superb production job for the time and a very interesting and puzziling cover, this is a record every prog fan of the 70's should have.

Not really a masterpiece, but great anyway. 4 stars.

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Send comments to Tarcisio Moura (BETA) | Report this review (#224764)
Posted Monday, July 06, 2009 | Review Permalink
Conor Fynes
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars 'Wish You Were Here' - Pink Floyd (7/10)

Pink Floyd have always been a band that the progressive music world has held in high esteem. Having released such amazing and dynamic works like 'The Wall' and 'Animals,' they are a band that has certainly won my respect and admiration. Of their substantial handful of albums that are lauded as being some of the best in the world however, 'Wish You Were Here' is the one album that leaves me scratching my head.

If there's any point I want to pull across for this review, it's how 'Wish You Were Here' certainly does not deserve the praise it receives from fans across the globe. It's not bad at all; it's a very relaxing and spaced out album that gives the listener a nice vessel of relaxation. But the album feels very one-tracked in the sort of vibe it gives.

Don't get me wrong, 'Wish You Were Here' is a masterpiece for what it is. As for as the composition, performance and production goes, nothing could really be improved without changing the album altogether. What robs it of it's extra star is the fact that I don't enjoy as much as I should an 'essential' album, and my life wouldn't be much different if I didn't have it in my collection.

'The Wall' spanned a great spectrum of sound, feeling and emotion, with a great concept to boot. 'Animals' was a very dynamic effort, with a fantastic climax and an even better concept. 'Dark Side Of The Moon' took me a while to appreciate, but it's overall cohesion and sense of 'darkness' won me over in the end. 'Wish You Were Here' is an album that's good for a few listens, but the sheer sameness of the album (without the same cohesion of 'Dark Side') really seems to wound the lasting appeal.

'Shine On You Crazy Diamond' is an homage to one of the true geniuses of the psychedelic movement, Syd Barrett. The two parts of the composition make up the bulk of the album, and it's definately represents what the album is all out; space and atmosphere. There is a great saxophone solo here, but nothing that really knocks me off my feet. This song, while being a sonically pleasant track (and the strongest work here) more times than not, the track reverts to sounding like the 'Blade Runner' theme music of Vanellis.

'Wish You Were Here,' the title track is overplayed, but a very well written song. The other remaining tracks 'Have A Cigar' and 'Welcome To The Machine' have nothing special about them, and while they are better than mere filler, they don't move me in any real way.

Three stars isn't a bad rating necessarily, it still means 'good' but simply non-essential as well. I think that fits this album. It's a good album, great if you like the 'jam sound' of it all, but while it is a work of masters, it's not essential, at least in my books.

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Send comments to Conor Fynes (BETA) | Report this review (#226841)
Posted Wednesday, July 15, 2009 | Review Permalink
4 stars 4 stars - based on my own enjoyment of the album.

Pink Floyd have enjoyed huge success relative to other early prog artists... perhaps due to their relative accessability. This accessibility allowed me to instantly get hooked on this album. From the incredibly atmospheric and soaring lead guitar sounds to the almost stoner-slow yet innexorable rhythm section. Vocals are top notch and production is way ahead of its time sounding almost fresh today. The choruses are BIG and catchy. Many many reasons that this is a wonderful album.

However, accessibility and instant engoyment for me does not necessarily translate into lasting appeal. In this case i rarely if ever put this album on these days. I have to be in just the right mood, which is rare. Other albums/bands I can listen to anytime no matter what my mood, yet not this one. Perhaps it is its relative slowness and slow-burning nature.

Anyway, I do not doubt this is a prog masterpiece and deserving of its place amongst the greats. But for me, I enjoy it only ever on a 4 star level.

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Send comments to bsms810 (BETA) | Report this review (#229212)
Posted Friday, July 31, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars As it stands, this is easily the greatest Pink Floyd experience for anybody new to Floyd. The first song welcomes anybody with ease; it contains all of the Floyd elements and ties them together beautifully. The distinct guitar, the subtle key part, the simplistic drum part, the dynamics, the vocals, saxophones, everything you'd expect of Floyd is present here. The lyrics will only come to mean something to the listener upon several listens, however, which one may deem negative. I guess, I do.

Welcome to the Machine is another great song. Completely different from any other song on the album, it introduces the versatility of the band lyrically, musically, and atmospherically.

I guess the next song, Have a Cigar, would have to be my least favorite, however some elements of it are worth question. The fact that it's sung by somebody out of the band (Roy Harper) adds to the effect the song is trying to portray; A two-faced music executive interested more in money and image than music. To be honest, I have zoned out quite a bit on this song most of the time. It has never really done it for me.

Wish You Were Here, the title track is easily one of Pink Floyd's biggest moments as a band. A perfect, abstract song about loss. Musically, just beautiful. Lyrically it's also a very good track, too. This song is important as I believe it proves Pink Floyd can write pop songs while still somehow having the air of being progressive and always moving towards something bigger.

The closer is just as magnificent as the opener. I can't really say much on it that hasn't been said, although the lyrics make a lot more sense after the first four tracks. Delightful song.

This album is incredibly tight. I wouldn't say it's Pink Floyd's most grand moment, but I'd say it comes damn close, rivaled only by Animals in my humble opinion.

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Send comments to Clutnuckle (BETA) | Report this review (#237341)
Posted Saturday, September 05, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars "Shine on your crazy diamond" as soaring beautifully soft, sumptuous sound, a unique emotion. Wright's keyboards are sublime and sweet solo by Gilmour, wonderful. "Welcome to the Machine" Foley exceptional, a real treat. The melody and the vocals are superbly performed. "Have a Cigar" as truly amazing, the singing is superb, the divine keyboards, drums Mason will be aerial and stylish, the large class. "Wish you were here" another exceptional on this album exceptional faubleux ... originality in addition, small inventions with his 'radio' set, a find well done. "Shine on your crazy diamond" how to keep an album so perfect? with a perfectly amazing song. "Pink Floyd" signs an amazing album, The Best during their careers, although possible when you know it is a tribute to Syd Barrett engineering group. "Pink Floyd" is in some way with this album the first group of its kind Progressive rock then the cons-culture resulted in an unprecedented commercial success. Syd Barrett will visit the group to finish recording the album, but members did not immediately recognize, Barrett with the haggard, swollen, shaven head, the crazy diamond has changed so much.

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Send comments to Discographia (BETA) | Report this review (#237434)
Posted Saturday, September 05, 2009 | Review Permalink
UMUR
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Honorary Collaborator
4 stars "Wish You Were Here" is the 9th full-length studio album by UK progressive rock act Pink Floyd. The album was released through Harvest/EMI in September 1975. After the huge commercial and artistic success of their last album "Dark Side of the Moon (1973)", Pink Floyd released an album that in many ways are different from "Dark Side of the Moon" but also have some similarities with that album. In keeping with it´s predecessor "Wish You Were Here" features a couple of guest appearances. Roy Harper sings lead on "Have a Cigar", The Blackberries sings choir vocals, and Dick Parry plays saxophone on "Shine On You Crazy Diamond Parts 6 - 9"

The pairing of progressive rock experimentation and more commercial inclined pop sensibility that was initiated on "Dark Side of the Moon" continues on "Wish You Were Here". If you take a song like the title track, it´s basically a more clever version of a commercial pop tune. If on the other hand you take the grand 13:40 minutes long opening track "Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part One" you´ll find plenty of progressive moments, so "Wish You Were Here" features a bit of both worlds. Both mentioned tracks are by the way gorgeous and represent Pink Floyd when they are strongest. The eerie synth laden "Welcome to the Machine" also falls into that catagory. Part two of "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" which closes the album is great too but the Roy Harper led blues rock song "Have a Cigar" could have been more interesting to my ears.

"Wish You Were Here" overall features some great vocals and instrumental performances. In those years Pink Floyd really understood how to soothe the listener´s ears with laidback and pleasant yet still intricate sounds. I´d mention David Gilmour´s guitar soloes as an example of that. They are incredibly well played and provides great emotional impact, but everything else being played are also well balanced.

The sound production is near perfect. Clean, powerful and pleasant on the ears. It might be lacking a bit of organic warmth in places compared to previous releases but it´s still a greatly enjoyable production. "Wish You Were Here" is all in all another high quality release by Pink Floyd. It´s not perfect in my opinion, but still spectacular enough to warrant a 4 - 4.5 star (85%) rating.

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Send comments to UMUR (BETA) | Report this review (#239557)
Posted Wednesday, September 16, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars What to do after such a masterpiece of magnificence as Dark Side Of The Moon? You could live as a Rock and Roll star everyday of your life or do another masterpiece and that's what Pink Floyd did with Wish You Were Here. 'Shine on Your Crazy Diamond' opens with one of the finest introductions of Prog Rock history, the mother of Octavarium. Wright and Gilmour combine perfectly, Waters sings with an emotion that touches our heart and Mason play what you have to play ... just a perfect piece. 'Welcome to the Machine' is one of the most groundbreakings songs I've listened to Floyd, the incessant rhythm of the synthesizer that plays Wright, Water's bass and Gilmour's wonderful guitar and his voice creates an atmosphere almost perfect . After two menacing, beautiful and disturbing songs .. we get 'Have a Cigar' to remind us of the roots of Blues music of Pink Floyd ... Roy Harper is fantastic. The title track needs no introduction, the sublime melody that Waters and Gilmour are removed along with Dave's voice lead us toward the end of the album ... the second part of 'Shine On', which is personally my favorite all components of the band look: Wright takes precious sounds of his keyboards, Gilmour plays guitar as if his life depended on it, Mason good as usual with the drums and Waters shines on bass and with his emotional voice. Definetly, a masterpiece.

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Send comments to Trianium (BETA) | Report this review (#242721)
Posted Saturday, October 03, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars The song Wish You Were Here is Pink Floyd's greatest hit(maybe after another brick in the wall). Many People who are not into prog, don't know what they are missing here. one of the greatest gems in rock music ever. The album starts with the heavenly Shine On You Crazy Diamond parts 1-5 which clock at almost 14 minutes. David Gilmour's guitar playing on this one are truly amazing, making him one of the greatest ever. Afterwards we got my favorite track on the album "Welcome to the Machine", very psychedelic and "pink floyd-ish" as we all learn to love. then we got "Have a Cigar" a nice rocking tune with great bass from Roger Waters, not their best but very nice. The next one is "Wish you were Here", just listen and fall in love with it. The grand finale is the second part of Shine On You Crazy Diamond parts 6-9. What a marvelous finish to a great album. No wonder it's on of PA top 10 albums. You can't have a prog collection without this one. Simply great!

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Send comments to BlindGuard (BETA) | Report this review (#244013)
Posted Saturday, October 10, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars I have over 4000 CDs/LPs. Everything from avant jazz to hillbilly bluegrass. I love it all. Public Enemy is my favorite rap act and Stockhausen my favorite serious/classical dude.

This is not only the greatest Prog album (if you want to call it Prog, I do), I think its the greatest album ever made. Smile by Brian Wilson would be #2. I don't just rank #1 in Prog, I simply rank it #1!

Wish YWH, is simply perfection. Amazing guitar, but still focussed on fluid melodic lines instead of just flash. And what lines Gilmore comes up with...jaw dropping. Lyrics with depth that make you think (albiet some hard to relate to, unless you're a rock star). Songwriting like we've never seen before, and production and performances to go along with that. It brings everything that a lover of Rock and/or Prog wants and needs.

This album is so darn good, it made me search out other bands and albums that might sound or feel remotely similar, just because I needed "more'. Things like other PF albums (Meddle, Obscurred By Clouds, Dark Side and Animals being the most similar), Camel's "Snow Goose", Traffic's "John Barlycorn Must Die", and some RPWL and Eloy.

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Send comments to akajazzman (BETA) | Report this review (#245794)
Posted Friday, October 23, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars What is there to be said about this album that has not already been said. It's been one of the top 3 albums in the archives since I first started checking that list, and many Floyd fans hail it as their best. Though I personally prefer Dark Side and Animals, I can see why WYWH is such a beloved album- all throughout there are incredible performances, especially the guitar and synthesizers- this album sounds a lot like Tangerine Dream at points. Another remarkable thing about this album is the emotion- the song topics are split between remembrance of fallen angel and former band leader Syd Barrett, whose famous visit to the recording studio has become a legendary story. Shine On You Crazy Diamond (both parts) and Wish You Were Here may be some of the most emotionally charged songs ever made, an area the Floyd certainly excels in. As for the second and third songs, these are scathing criticisms of the music industry. Welcome to the Machine may contain more cosmic synthy effects than any Floyd song, and rivals Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream as far as spacey goodness goes. As for Have a Cigar, it sounds a lot like Pigs (Three Different Ones) from Animals, with incredible interplay between bass, synth, and guitar that makes this a very angry-sounding song. WYWH is a downright masterpiece and an essential for any fan of really good music.

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Send comments to Neurotarkus (BETA) | Report this review (#247702)
Posted Sunday, November 01, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars A prog rock masterpiece.

It's not easy to make a prog rock masterpiece, considering all the elements, all the tiny little pieces that prog consists of, it's seems almost impossible. Wish You Were Here somehow succeeds, it's not only Pink Floyd's greatest album, it's really one of the best prog albums of all time, and that's impressive.

Wish You Were Here includes of a long (about 25 minutes) suite (however, it's split in two, it couldn't fit into one side). It's called Shine on Your Crazy Diamond. It's a great suite, with great lyrical moments (sung and written by Waters) and some of Wright's jazz and Gilmour's blues. A bit melancholic, and mellow, works well with the general theme of the album. Many long songs usually tend to take over albums, Foxtrot with Supper's Ready, Close to the Edge with Close to the Edge or Meddle with Echoes. In Wish You Were Here, Shine on does not take over the show, it's a great track, but not too pretentious and it let's the other tracks of the album breathe and shine through.

Welcome to the Machine is the best track on the album. It's a proto-industrial, electronic thing. Somewhat abstract lyrics, perfect with Dave's voice. It's melancholic, yet it have this strange Pink Floyd experimental feel. It's not quite cold and yet it's strangely filled of angst. In general, it's an exiting track.

Have a Cigar is the "regular rock track". It's quite aggressive, of course, as aggressive as Pink Floyd can get. Pulsing bass and raw guitar. Not my favourite track, but it makes for an interesting intermission to the rather experimental, spacey stuff. Much like what Money did to Dark Side of the Moon. And Roy Harper sings, isn't that neat?

Wish You Were Here, the title track, is a typical acoustic track. It's a lyrical masterpiece. It has the essential Floydian lyrics. Roger's best work - and I mean that. Who could ever have thought the line; "we're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl", would be so emotional. The lyrics have allot to do with the concept of the album, yes it's a concept album. It's pays a tribute to the former (late) front man, Roger (Syd) Barrett whilst attacking the absurdity of the music industry.

It's a masterpiece. I love it. It's experimental and melancholic nature, it's the essential Floyd album, and without doubt one of the few essential prog albums. Five stars.

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Send comments to Silverbeard McStarr (BETA) | Report this review (#249869)
Posted Tuesday, November 10, 2009 | Review Permalink
3 stars I am surprised to see so many people praise it as the ultimate prog masterpiece, as it isn't even Pink Floyd's best album. Don't mean it's bad, it's good, it's very good. But a masterpiece? Of PROGRESSIVE music? No way!

I must admit though that some (maybe most) of the material is very, very solid. We have a great title track, my favorite acoustic number of theirs, very emotional piece of music, even if I grew a little bit tired of it due to criminal overplay on classic rock radio stations. And then we have "Welcome to the Machine" - the most intriguing and atmospheric song here, very well arranged with acoustic background and some great keyboard/synth work on top of it and a haunting vocal performance by David Gilmour. These are, in my opinion, the two best songs here. "Have a Cigar" is not so impressive, a nice rocker, but quite straightforward in its structure, only Gilmour soloing near the end gives it some kind of edge, which saves it from being pretty generic. And of course we have that classic transition with "WYWH" - one of the most original song transitions ever put on record.

The main problem, for me is, the suite, "Shine On You Crazy Diamond". Praised by many as one of the best things ever done in prog, I have a really hard time digging what's so great about it. Apart from the intro, which is - I must admit - quite an impressive piece of mood-building, all we got from it is just a - quite generic - 20-minute BLUES song. You got it right. At least during the remaining 8 minutes of part 1 (the intro lasts 5 minutes or so) we have nothing but blues. It may be good blues, with some great guitar playing but first of all: not the GREATEST blues ever written, and second of all: we're talking about - supposedly - PROG masterpiece here. What's so prog about blues, especially in 1975? Then we have part 2 which for most part is just an instrumental jam. Pink Floyd aren't really masters of their instruments, so unless they create some spacey or dark atmosphere, there is no point in instrumental jamming at all. So they start this second part with a 'dark' bassline and they gradually start to build up on it, but this time it is less effective than at the very beginning of this record. Then we have a reprise of the familiar chorus from part 1, followed by some instrumental jamming which basically lasts till the end of this album (about 6 minutes or so) and is not really impressive, neither musically, nor 'emotionally'. It just drags. And that's the main problem with this 2-part song. There are some good sections but they never know when to stop. I mean, of all its 26 minutes, there is 10, maybe 15 minutes of really creative music. Actually, the edit of this song that can be found on "Echoes" compilation works way more effectively than this album version, although if I had my way, i'd cut it even more (but certainly not to 6 minutes, as on "Collection of Great Dance Songs", that intro really HAS to be heard - it's one of the best things on the album!).

Generally, my overall evaluation of this album is still closer to positive than negative, there are some classic moments here that rank among some of the greatest things ever done by this great band. I thought about giving it 4 stars because it really is an 'excellent addition', but granted that this album has so many enthusiastic reviews already, i felt the responsibility to emphasize rather the FLAWS of this album (even if they are in minority compared to its positive sides), which many people seem to ignore, awarding "fives" without any really deep insight. So I'm going to give it a 3 (OK, be it 3,5 rounded down). Still meaning, it's GOOD, but really, not essential, when compared to some of the milestones of progressive rock, like "ITKOTCK", "CTTE", "TAAB" or "SEBTP" or even "DSOTM" for that matter...

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Send comments to nuncjusz (BETA) | Report this review (#249884)
Posted Tuesday, November 10, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars A fantastic album, but Floyd's best? Not in this reviewer's opinion!

No doubt this is an album that should be in everybody's collection. It's an important, emotionally-charged masterpiece from beginning to end. Getting from beginning to end is the only issue I have here. Shine On, while great, has never wowed me like other prog epics. I always find myself bored listening to it. The guitar work is phenomenal, and it builds wonderfully at points, but at other points, I just find myself wanting to listen to anything else on the album.

Everything else? Fantastic. This was my first Floyd album and it got me into them big time. I'd say even though it's not a 5-star album, I would call it essential, both due to the quality of the songwriting and the overall importance of it. Plus, it has my favorite album art of all time!

Oh, and as of this writing the album has 777 rating and 77% of them are 5 stars. Just wanted to make a note of that.

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Send comments to sprouticus (BETA) | Report this review (#250351)
Posted Friday, November 13, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars I was 11 years old when i listend for the first time this album, it was a very old tape with a lot ground noise. I falled in love soon of that tunes, they entered straightly in my heart and till now Pink Floyd have a very special place in my heart. Wish you were here, nowadays, is not even my favourite PF album, i prefer the first period ones, but without doubt is a real masterpiece. Shine on you crazy diamond is one of the best song ever, but all the album have no weak moment. This is the last album with the contribution of Wright, the most underrated member of the band. He mainly created the PF sound and SOYCD is his masterpieces

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Send comments to bungle77 (BETA) | Report this review (#251166)
Posted Tuesday, November 17, 2009 | Review Permalink
friso
PROG REVIEWER
3 stars Pink Floyd - Wish You Were Here (1975)

Who makes the album, the artist or the equipment?

I think that in this case the record is mainly liked because of its splendid production and gentle key-sounds, drums and dreamy guitars. It wins on all fronts of all the other prog albums made before this one when comparing the overall sound of the album. BUT.. did Pink Floyd themselves make a great record? No, I think they didn't. If you are already in an emotional mood quit reading right now, because this will make a lot of people furious or sentimental.

The first thing I've got to cope with is the extremely boring opening section of Shine on you Crazy Diamond part one. Great symphonic key presets, great guitar amplification, but a total lack of interesting composition or progressive thinking. The following main guitar part is nice, but one simple guitar chord doesn't fill up minutes of music for me. When the vocal melodies appear the tracks become quite nice, but to poppy for me. The main melody is fine though.

Welcome to the machine and Have a cigar are both tracks that must have been written in the studio using all the perfect equipment. Pink Floyd completely looses itself in the sounds of the keys and does nothing interesting at all on the composional side of the tracks. Just simple chord changes with massive amplification and a no-risk guitar approach of Gilmour. This doesn't satisfy me at all, quit hiding Pink Floyd! As if I wan't tormented enough the down tempo country classic Wish you were here. I'm not even going to discuss this pop-song. On part two f Shine on You Crazy Diamond Pink Floyd succeeds in trying to get to their old level of compositions. It's better then part one.

Conclusion. The production of the album is perfect, what did I say? Angelic! The compositions are very simple and Pink Floyd completely lost itself in it's amazing sound. For this I can't really see this as a progressive album, it just sounds progressive. Maybe my musical training did no good in liking this album, but I do want to be honest about who limited this album actually is, beneath it's cover of sounds and emotionally driven themes. Three stars for this one.

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Send comments to friso (BETA) | Report this review (#251499)
Posted Wednesday, November 18, 2009 | Review Permalink
Bonnek
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Prog Metal Team
4 stars This used to be another favourite of my teenage years, but it's one of those albums that hasn't grown on me all that well. Of course there are flashes of brilliance, but for the first time, some latent flaws of the Pink Floyd formula become visible.

All instrumental sections of the album are amazing, but they sound less involved then on previous albums. Pink Floyd have lost their edge a bit here. Maybe the focus was too much on the mix and production of the album and less on the actual playing, which might have resulted in the rather clinical sound and detached musicianship. With Animals they rectified this completely.

Another thing that doesn't sit entirely well with me is the actual songs, or should I say the vocals. The chorus of Shine On hasn't a really strong melody and is one of Pink Floyd's few sentimental moments. Given the average rating, I do realize of course that I might be one of the few people on earth who thinks like that.

Also Welcome To The Machine is more convincing for Richard Wright's ground-breaking synth playing then for Roger Waters rather strained vocal. Have A Cigar is a fun but forgettable track and Pink Floyd's campfire moment Wish You Were Here is one that I always skip. On part two of Shine On this album comes alive again. The first 5 minutes are pure magic. The continuation after the short verse and chorus is quite good as well.

Had this been from any other band I would have rated this 4 stars without much further debate, but given this is Pink Floyd I need to round it down to 3 stars in order to keep a bit of perspective on how good their masterpieces Umma Gumma Live, Meddle, Animals and DSOTM are for me.

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Send comments to Bonnek (BETA) | Report this review (#252184)
Posted Sunday, November 22, 2009 | Review Permalink
5 stars Exquisite. That is how I think about this album. This is simply breathtakingly beautiful, the soundscapes created are just perfect. I think the way to approach to this album is not expecting fast or complex music, one has to be able to see through the layers, this is more than mere music, this is art. Of course the highlights are the parts of the epic "Shine On", but none or the songs are filler, Welcome to the Machine, has an awesome synth tension building, followed by acoustic guitar,and a great moog solo by master Wright. Have a cigar, is the most regular song here as it is more on the rock side, but still is awesome, the synth-guitar riff it's great. Wish you were here is a "pop" ballad if you will, but still it's very beatiful, great vocal work by the way. Shine On, it's one of the most great things in music at least in my opinion, the synth opening is great, it really helps to set the mood, then Gilmour does some great riffing, and the brief but amazing verses come in. My favourite part is when the sax goes mad, with the beautiful four note guitar and the synths backing it all, it's really a moving experience. The second part of the epic while not better than the first, it's still awesome in its own rights, with my favourite part being the long psychedelic jam, with cool moog sounds, and then the soft and gentle fade out(piano is a nice touch). This is a classic album that has passed the test of time, and everytime I hear it still gets better, with new sounds I hadn't heard before, those are signs of masterpiece at least for me. I recommend this album to all the people that has any musical taste at all, I think there is enough substance so that everyone can grab something, keyboard players really should look for this album as this is Wright's best work, a master in playing and the most important- knowing when not to play- a thing that it's rare in musicians. Really the only people that I can think who may not like this album are power metal fans or one minded thrash metal fans. The best album from Floyd and one of the best in music at all.

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Send comments to progkeys (BETA) | Report this review (#252379)
Posted Monday, November 23, 2009 | Review Permalink
4 stars The Best Pink Floyd album by a extremely large margin. Shine on You crazy diamond is a peach of a track and possibly in my top 100 prog songs of all time. I'm not Floyds biggest fan as anybody reading my critique of their music in comparisson to the true masters of prog rock, Genesis & Yes. I suppose they are always classed as space rock - but this CD takes floyd into symphonic prog territory. I am not particularly fond of "Have a cigar" nor "Welcome to the Machine" and thus this CD has lost a star. I do like "Wish you were here" but I love "Shine on" especially the start and the nice simple but effective guitar & synth. It is spoiled a bit by the female harmony (USE MELLOTRON) and the saxophone and again that stops this from gaining 5 stars. I do so love the synth right at the end though. FOUR STARS !

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Send comments to M27Barney (BETA) | Report this review (#259458)
Posted Tuesday, January 05, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars People......stop saying this is a masterpiece. yes it is good music, and a very good album. and yes i will agree that any prog lover should own it, and any floyd fan should own it, but, now this is just my opinion, it is not their best work. the song, "wish u were here" I could care less if I never heard it again for the rest of my life. they lost a little creativity with this album, but it's ok cuz it's good music. 'shine on' is a nice song.....I am not lucky enough to see them do it, but I was fortunate enough to see the band "the machine" do it live and it was very powerful. easily own this..... but i would not put it quite up there with 'selling england by the pound', 'larks tongues in aspic', 'exit stage left', or mahavishnu's 'birds of fire'. if anyone is even still reading this review, yes this and 'dark side...' are good albums and must-listens.... but I have always needed that raw floyd era-meddle and obscurred. just havin fun people

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Send comments to smuggledmutation (BETA) | Report this review (#259700)
Posted Thursday, January 07, 2010 | Review Permalink
Marty McFly
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
Errors and Omissions Team
5 stars I'm sad that some people, even they'll never admit it, voted "against" (which means 3 stars here) Pink Floyd, just because it's overrated album. Being it some other group, releasing just this album, they would give more. Or at least that's how I see it. I'll not name, no no.

So what to say about actual music ? That everything fits (PF's stereotype), it has original ideas (you can find them on most of PF's albums), dark lyrics (another cliché of PF), possible Waters influence (even we'll never find out exact percentage of his reign), long concept-like tracks (well, haven't you heard this one before ?) and some other factors that makes successful Pink Floyd music. I've waited, waited and was rewarded by "Shine" main theme, if we can use this term. Welcome's weirdness and interesting last 50 seconds. Yes, these "sounds" can be considered as interesting, as we're somehow released from dark satanic magic ritual music that can cause severe mental problems on more labile individuals. Let's have a cigarette, oh, I mean cigar is somehow flagship of their, even sometimes repeating itself (which annoys a little bit). Nicely transits into Wish You Were Here, I don't have to talk about this one, do I ? It's beautiful in a more ways than just one, even fails on prog side. In this case, and I'm saying it for the first time in my life, "To the hell with prog for this time". Don't quote me here (I know you will anyway). I can just recommend youtube video with changing pictures to this song, it's nice piece of work. And last track, together with first one makes solid piece. When you shut down your brain during "empty" scenes (because they're sparse - I mean beginning's wind for example), you get strong body of music that lives, very persuasively to be honest.

5(-), But I don't care about repeating of schemes. Because ideas are new, music is great and pompously big (you can feel how full the music is) and it all works perfectly, so no one gets hurt, everyone's happy, we are live happily ever after and the work is done. Interesting enough to note, wikipedia provides very detail info on whole album and Shine track (different layers, where stats what etc).

minus point because of "emptty" parts that works far worse than in case of "Echoes" song.

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Send comments to Marty McFly (BETA) | Report this review (#263382)
Posted Friday, January 29, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars What do you do when you've made the best album of all time? Attempt to do it again obviously.

This album does have a lot of characteristics of what Dark Side Of The Moon had, but without all the success and not as much passion & power.

This album was a great album, and easily could get 5 stars, but one song let the whole album down I believe (I will move on to that later).

This album could be stereotyped as a Dark Side rip off, but to be honest there are a lot of unique points about the album which set it aside from Dark Side (mainly the first and last songs).

1. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part 1 - An absolute astounding piece of music. The build up with synths & guitars. The instrumental parts are amazing and incredibly memorable. The lyrics are very beautiful and are about Syd (before and after the mentalness). Amazing vocals from Dave & Roger. The choir parts are amazing as well.

2. Welcome To The Machine - This song is one of the worst things this band have ever done. What is the point of it?it's just boring, pathetic and very forced. Dave sounded very unhappy to be singing this song. The lyrics are poor and quite childish (but maybe that's the way they're supposed to be?) This song could have easily not made it on the album.

3. Have A Cigar - Basically the Money of the album. This riff was also stolen by Dream Theater for their song Peruvian Skies. I love Roy Harper's vocals in this song, they're very obtuse and right for the subject matter, hubris obviously.

4. Wish You Were Here - An amazing beautiful ballad. The lyrics are amazing (except for the line about a war and a cage. That is still a little ambiguous. I love the talk box solo as well.

5. Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part 2 - An amazing start, flowing both from the end of Part 1 and Wish You Were Here. The saxophone work is amazing, and I love the discordant climax at the end of the guitar solo, with the synth's discord like harmony. The end is a very jazz like jam, with some great musicianship. I thought the Echoes version of the whole thing was a lot better than the album version and the Pulse live version as well. All in all, an amazing piece of music.

CONCLUSION: This would have been a classic album, if it weren't for that one weak song.

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Send comments to arcane-beautiful (BETA) | Report this review (#270987)
Posted Wednesday, March 10, 2010 | Review Permalink
3 stars I was not overly impressed with this album. I very much enjoyed Animals and seeing that this was rated higher, I thought I was in for a treat, but the songs are very boring and lack the same passion I thought was on Animals. The SOYCD Suite is much too long, (both parts) And I did not feel that there were any exceptional displays of musicianship of this album. Have a cigar is prolly the best song. The rest of the album is very monotonous. However, its not terrible. Definitely a stoner album. Not something I would listen to regularly, but I am not regreting my purchase like I did after some albums by Genesis. 3 stars for me!

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Send comments to garla1lh (BETA) | Report this review (#275381)
Posted Monday, March 29, 2010 | Review Permalink
thehallway
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars UPDATE: The four-star review below contains more negative points than positive ones. Let me state that really I love this album, along with those surrounding it, but it is overrated to a degree, and far too serious (in fact, the only song which you're alowed to break wind during is 'Have a Cigar'). Nice production though.....

REVIEW: Dark Side was amazing. Here there is less to explore. The content of 'WYWH' is as high- quality as any resepctable follow up, but there simply isn't enough of it to keep me AS interested as I am in 'DSOTM'. The music on this album seems to be very "careful". I get the impression when I listen to it, that the band spent more time refining, filtering and producing, than actually creating. All the material seems to be so carefully chosen; they've omitted anything which could be seen as inferior (or superior) to 'Dark Side'. And there is very little product left at the end of this process.

'Wish You Were Here' has half as many songs as it's predeccessor, and despite actually being longer, it feels much shorter after a complete listen. Yes, the five songs are very good quality, but they aren't expanded upon, they are barely progressive, and there's just generally less to explore. And the production is so perfect, that there's just no colour anymore. It's bland. It's white, like the cover. 'Dark Side's cover was black, but with a splash of rainbow. 'WYWH' could benefit aethestically and musically from such a makeover. I'm not saying it's bad, but simply processed.

'Shine on...' is of course, a wonderfully atmospheric suite of light and dark. But in relation to my earlier point, these hues are all shades of the same colour. Strip the entire 26 minutes down and what you see is (as somebody else mentioned in a review) and extended piece of blues. Obviously blues is great, and Pink Floyd are arguably the best band to carry the style from the Black-American roots of it's past, into the spacey, electronic world of the future. But given it's domination of the album, I think the time could have been used more effectively. Sure, the improvisational sections are cosmic, but save those for live gigs- lets see more songwriting in the studio. The title track is as advertised and the other two deal with the "machine" that is the music industry. Which leads to my next minor issue with this 'not-so-great masterpiece'. The album has TWO concepts: the theme of loss, deprivation, seperation, etc, and the theme of the music industry, record executives and commercialisation. Does Roger Waters prove his point with these concepts? Yes. Are these concepts explored to their full potential? No. Had each one been dedicated to an entire album, there would be much more scope for lyrics, repeated themes, different viewpoints, and a whole other bunch of musical goodies that AREN'T present here. The surrounding albums, 'DSOTM' and 'Animals' both deal with one single concept and explore it from different angles, creating many more musical opportunities (even 'The Wall' does this). But 'WYWH' half-heartedly touches upon two unrelated concepts, and reveals them through music which is continuously strong, but rarely interesting.

I give this album four stars because it's safely within the realms of post 'Dark Side' Floyd and it's on the right side of the Wall. But within this category, it is the weakest.

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Send comments to thehallway (BETA) | Report this review (#277993)
Posted Thursday, April 15, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars This is my first review of Pink Floyd albums, others to come soon, at a ProgArchives site near you... Generally speaking, and without talking about lots of opinions published here, I am not a huge fan of P. Floyd. It is too much guitar oriented in my taste. I know a majority in the rest of the world find them as THE best Prog group, and that's ok for me, because of their contribution, popularity and notoriety. But even if I have their last 7 albums, I don't feel it is their best. Plus, I would consider this one, in my taste, as being surpassed by maybe 100 CD's in my prog collection. It might be considered by a vast audience here as a masterpiece, because of 'Shine on you' and the general quality of each track, which I recognize, but personally I go for a score of 4, which is 'an excellent addition to a prog music collection'. Why ? There is a little too much of empty space in the music, where the guitar contribution, by moments, is going in improvisations. Oh! not all the time... But just enough to dis-route me from totally liking the opus.

While we talk about 'Floyd', in my opinion, only 'Dark Side' deserves the of 5.... coming soon. The 'empty space' mentioned is also present in other 'classic-recognized CD's', which is not the case for TDSTM (in my humble view). On the other hand, I see other CD's of the group as having a score of 4, including the latest- without-Waters 'Lapse of Reason' and 'Division Bell'. Which equal this one (what a shame ??). Well, I feel they are equally musically interesting than this present one, even if not considered as classics. You know, recent music is good, also... Anyway, an interesting piece.

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Send comments to Progdaybay (BETA) | Report this review (#278194)
Posted Friday, April 16, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars The overall thing is not the best for me, but Shine on you crazy diamond, in all their parts, makes this album a five stars one. I think that with Wish you were here, Waters started to conduct Pink Floyd to his solo project. I can see that in the tracks Welcome to the machine and Have a cigar, both two composed by him. Those tracks have a weakness side on their music. Good songs but no more than this. Shine on you? is really different, just a masterpiece of progressive rock, in which Gilmour and Wright were participated too in the songwritting. The keyboard solos by Wright are more than originals, they are simple but transmits a great feeling, and fits well with the rest instrumentals parts. These instrumentals mute from great guitar solos to a combined job with all the instruments, with a really progressive feeling. The final solo is once more unique, in terms of the originality. Gilmour said once that it seems a funeral march. If is that, maybe is the best one I ever heard. The tittle song is another good one, composed by Waters and Gilmour. For me this song shines much more in the live performances, specially in the The Delicate sound of the Thunder album.

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Send comments to genbanks (BETA) | Report this review (#278732)
Posted Tuesday, April 20, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here is one of those seminar albums that pop up once in a while. While all the fuss was over Dark Side Of The Moon, two years previously, i always found this album to be musically more adventurous, and therefore more Prog. The album kicks off with Shine On You Crazy Diamond with Richard Wright really outdoing the last piano note on A Day In The Life by The Beatles. Wrights piano note must last for minutes and minutes before he changes it a bit to remind Gilmour that he has to come in soon. How Wright is getting the sustain on that piano note, God only knows.....But i digress. When Gilmour does come in, it gives me a real shiver of satisfaction. Robert Walters then enters the fray with his plaintive vocal about remembering when he was young and shining like the sun, which would suggest that this song is about Robert Walters rather than Nick Barrett. "Welcome To The Machine" is drearily beautiful. In my opinion you can make dreary beautiful, like Floyd skilfully do or just simply be dreary like Radiohead. Good old analogue synths are the tops in this track, with Richard Wright reminding us just how fat and solid those old synths were, as compared to the clean as a whistle digital clean ness of today. Vocally the song appears to be about Robert and Dave telling their Mums that they are going out to buy a guitar to punish them with. ( Maybe the Mums hated Prog )

"Have A Cigar" takes a pretty rocking Nobby approach with some fine grooves going on with the whole band. For reasons known only to myself, every time i hear this song i picture the year 1975 lit up in neon for some reason. We then move onto the title track which is a beautiful acoustic number with Dave Gilmour telling us of how he is a lost soul and swims in a fish bowl year after year.......Maybe if he had got out of the habit we would have had more Pink Floyd albums.....Less of the swimming David. "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" part 2 is simply mindblowing, from the opening wind sounds, giving way to the throbbing Bass of Robin Waters, right through to the bluesy middle section, and on to the beautiful ending, which again is exclusively Richard Wright. Not one solitary note is to be missed on this beautiful album.

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Send comments to ChitWinterwheat (BETA) | Report this review (#278912)
Posted Wednesday, April 21, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars This album was released a couple years after "Dark Side of the Moon.".

It was pretty cool the way you seem to be in outer space. It is like you are just floating alone in your own little world. Then David Gilmore strikes his axe with a killer choice of notes again and again, until the rest of the band can take it no longer. Nick Mason decides to come thundering in with his drumming and wow, what an effective opening to an epic song! If you play the guitar at all, you learn how to play his beginning lick. This song is a breakthrough in blues. Man, it just keeps getting better and better. Probably one of the best blues tunes I've ever heard. I even love the sax at the end. It is all killer!

Of course the boys are fixating on Syd Barrett. "Shine on" is like an epitaph to the former band founder. I may comment on why Syd left the band in the first place at some future point.

Anyway, "Shine on" flows into the next song which is "Welcome to the machine." It is a good song, but it seems to be a touch too long for the material they utilize. Of course now it is dated because of the moog synth. It still retains that spacy sound which helps.

"Have a cigar" is about the dark side of the record company and it is just right. Well done indeed. What I do like about Pink Floyd is how they connect their songs together so that it becomes one giant song. That is a plus in my book. Anyway, "Wish you were here" is another one of those songs you have got to learn if you play the guitar. Then lastly we come back to the beginning with the ever lovin' reprise. It is good, but for me it seemed to peter out and therefore it was less enjoyable than the first side. I didn't care for the synth stuff. I like the guitar much better.

All in all this is inferior, as far as the special effects goes, to "Dark Side," but overall it is a better album than its predecessor. I give this one 4 stars, due to the things I didn't care for.

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Send comments to Keetian (BETA) | Report this review (#280134)
Posted Saturday, May 01, 2010 | Review Permalink
progpositivity
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars Everything is in perfect balance on this LP. Roger Water's passion and sarcastic barbs are counterbalanced by David Gilmour's melodious guitar and smooth vocals, Richard Wright's spacey and dreamy keyboards, and Nick Mason's tasteful drumming.

Gilmour composed the short note sequence that would be expanded to become "Shine on Your Crazy Diamond" parts 1 and 2. Instead of recording and presenting the extended suite 'straight through' like they had done with the song "Echoes", Waters proposed splitting it into two sections, using each section as a bookend for a few additional songs to fit the concept and round out the album. Gilmour initially didn't warm to the idea but was out-voted 3 to 1. This is yeat another illustration of - at least musically if not lyrically - a healthy measure of creative equanimity in the band's decision making process.

It seems odd to think back to when this album was released. At the time, I considered myself somewhat contrarian for rating it better than their previous release "Dark Side of the Moon". Years later, David Gilmour and Richard Wright both marked "Wish You Were Here" as their favorite of all the Pink Floyd albums. I'm pleasantly surprised to discover how many masterpiece (5 star) ratings have been registered by Prog Fans in the PA community.

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Send comments to progpositivity (BETA) | Report this review (#280899)
Posted Friday, May 07, 2010 | Review Permalink
Flucktrot
PROG REVIEWER
5 stars We've all heard it, we all have it, and most of us love it. Unlike most other prog classics, these descriptors also apply to most classic rockers too--a reflection of the relative simplicity, emotion, and quality of Wish You Were Here.

I have always loved David Gilmour's contributions to the band, and not surprisingly, his favorite Floyd album is the same as mine. It's full, it's heartfelt, and it's simple enough to just put on and doze off to. Or you can focus on Gilmour's fantastic guitar, Waters' poignant lyrics, or Wright's wonderfully understated keys and soundscapes. (Waters' bass and Mason's drums are also there, but they add very little). Special mention must be made to the first Shine On movement, which was usually my favorite tune to crank up on the family stereo system when I was home alone as a kid, and which also influenced me to take up the saxophone as a middle-schooler (well, that and Springsteen's Thunder Road!).

Whatever mood I'm in, Wish You Were Here never disappoints. It may not be the greatest prog--whatever your definition of that may be--but it sure is a fantastic progressive album.

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Send comments to Flucktrot (BETA) | Report this review (#282835)
Posted Thursday, May 20, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars Two in a row!

With this album, Pink Floyd was faced with the challenge of attempting to exceed this albums predecessor, which was a masterpiece. Well I'd say they did just that. When Dark Side Of The Moon was made, it was thought that that'd be the bands peak, but with this album they managed to climb even higher.

A description of the music: Wish You Were Here is bookended by two different tracks that are technically the same song. This song is the magnificent "Shine On You Crazy Diamond." This song is good old Pink Floyd and contains great solos from Gilmour and nice, groovy beats. "Welcome To The Machine" is a spacey song with unique sounding vocals. "Have A Cigar" features Roy Harper on vocals and a pretty odd sounding guitar riff. It also has a great guitar solo. The title track is legendary. It is one the first songs many learn on their acoustic guitars. It is a bit more pop-influenced than the rest, but that's no problem here as it's still an amazing track.

PROS:

The intro: The intro to "Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part One" I found was an incredibly effective way to open the album. From the moment that ambient, spacey keyboard flows through your ears, you know you're in for a wonderful musical adventure. The keyboard is soon joined by a gentle saxophone that just increases the ambient feeling. David Gilmour joins in after the sax and plays with the feeling and soul that he is famous for. After the keyboard dies out, an echoing riff is played, and after thats repeated a few times, we're thrown into the song.

The solos: Gilmour is at his best in this album. His solos range from the incredible feeling and emotion from the "Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part One" intro to the groovy, catchy one in "Have A Cigar" to the whining acoustic one in the title track. No weak solos for him on this album.

The lyrics: The lyrics in "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" and the title track are tribute to Syd Barret. And the incredible use of metaphors, such as "Did you exchange a walk-on part in a way / For a lead role in a cage?" in the title track really makes it effective. "Welcome To The Machine" and "Have A Cigar" are stabs at the music industry. "Welcome to the Machine" was creative as it had machine effects to make it sound as a literal machine, yet the machine is the music industry the character is entering.

CONS:

The length: The only con I could really think of is the albums short length. This means you may not be getting that much time for your money, but it's still very worth it.

Song ratings: Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part One: 10/10 Welcome To The Machine: 10/10 Have A Cigar: 8.5/10 Wish You Were Here: 9/10 Shine On You Crazy Diamond Part Two: 9.5/10

Recommended for: Anyone who is a prog fan.

My rating: 5 stars. Get it now. This is one of the greatest prog albums you will find so if you don't have it, do not pass up any chance to get it. Your collection will never be complete without it.

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Send comments to DisgruntledPorcupine (BETA) | Report this review (#283295)
Posted Monday, May 24, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here is a tightly crafted and genuinely heartfelt masterpiece of rock music. It is the definitive psychedelic album, and easily one of the greatest albums ever recorded. My distain for Rolling Stone Magazine was strongly reaffirmed when they placed Wish You Were Here at a paltry 209th on their list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

There are two main concepts behind the album; the first and most evident being, the loss of cohesion within the band and the longing for better days now gone by. As most of us know Shine on You Crazy Diamond is a tribute to Pink Floyd founding member Syd Barrett. Roger Waters was good friends with Barrett, who sadly suffered a mental breakdown which forced him to leave the band. In addition, the great of egos which made Pink Floyd had begun to clash seriously. The tracks which lean more towards this concept are Shine On, parts one and two as well as the title track.

The second concept which is also quite apparent, but not spelled out right in the title of the album is the hallow nature of the recording industry. Welcome to the Machine and Have a Cigar err more towards this concept.

Musically, Wish You Were Here is not a very happy album. It is dark, atmospheric and steeped in lament. The lead track is the first half of Shine On You Crazy Diamond. It begins with an extended instrumental introduction. It sets the tone immediately. The dominant sound is Keyboard player Rick Wright, and with the exception of the shorter middle pieces he remains ubiquitous. The intro piece is mostly sombre and has an atmosphere like a thick, cold and wet blanket.

Following the fade out from Shine On, we are confronted by a number of frightening mechanical effects. This is the introduction to, my personal favourite track of the album Welcome to the Machine. It is dark, sparse and foreboding and captivating from the mechanical clicks through to the dinner party.

Have a Cigar is probably my least favourite track on the album. Not because it's bad or anything of the sort, but because it doesn't really seem to fit in as well with the other tracks. It serves to break the album out of its drifting malaise. It has a much harder edge and rather than being dominated by Wright's expansive synthesizers, it is mostly a showcase for Water's bass and Gilmour's Guitar. Gilmour's soloing is particularly good in the latter half of the piece. The song is a cynical portrayal of music executives. It is exceptionally well written.

Usually when a single as excellent and heavily played as Wish You Were Here appears on an album it serves as an elephant in the room. In reality the album is so good, the title track is but one piece of a larger masterwork; certainly an important piece, but actually a very small one by comparison. It is by no means the only reason you should have this album. I don't think I really have to describe it to anyone. If you don't know what it is you live under something much heavier than a rock. Personally I love the imagery in the lyrics and the incredibly strong emotions which it conveys.

Rounding out this already fantastic musical collection is the second half of Shine on you Crazy Diamond. It is slightly longer than the first half and if I'm not mistaken it's has an even greater proportion of instrumental to lyrical. It begins in a shallow sea of synthesizers from which Gilmour's wailing guitar towers. Things slowly turn noisier and the long journey gets into full swing. It isn't quite as atmospheric as the first half and at times much jazzier. Aside from the repeated lyrics it's really its own beast. Much like the many differences which exist between the two parts of Thick as a Brick tied together by similar themes.

Wish You Were Here is raw and emotional and the playing is superb all the way through. If you haven't yet heard it, you really ought to get on that. I don't think I could really give such a well realized album anything less a perfect five out of five.

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Send comments to R-A-N-M-A (BETA) | Report this review (#283524)
Posted Wednesday, May 26, 2010 | Review Permalink
Rune2000
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Prog Metal Team
4 stars After the tremendous success of Dark Side Of The Moon one would assume that Pink Floyd would try to replicate its themes to create an even bolder statement of a record. This scenario wasn't all too unlikely considering that the band did just that when they followed up Atom Heart Mother with Meddle. Fortunately, Pink Floyd had a few new tricks up their sleeve.

The album that we got looked more like a polished combination of the song format explored on Meddle and the conceptual themes of Dark Side Of The Moon. The lengthy piece titled Shine On You Crazy Diamond was split up in two parts that opened and closed the album and thus became a natural continuation of the previous exploration of the long track format. This epic might not reach the majestic realms of Echoes due to its more direct compositional style but it's easily the next best 10+ minute track that the band had conceived over the years.

The middle section of Wish You Were Here, featuring Welcome To The Machine and Have A Cigar, comes off sounding too polished and almost excessively mechanical to my ears. I'm also not so keen on the extended intro/outro sections that only seemed to get longer and longer with every new track. I realize that, when used in the right way, this effect can make the composition feel more smooth and fluent but I always though that Pink Floyd tended to overuse it to the point where it all became more of a gimmick than an enhancement of the sound. Unlike the two stale predecessors, the album's title track gives a perfectly executed intro section which doesn't rely on effects but instead gets its momentum from the prolonged acoustic guitar interplay intro. Originally I didn't care much for this little song but my opinion completely changed after seeing Roger Waters perform it on his In the Flesh Tour back in 2001. Nowadays it's an obligatory acoustic number that both Waters and Gilmour are almost obliged to perform on almost every set-list and its message gets more important with every passing year.

Even if the performances feel almost excessively polished on Wish You Were Here, which can be explained by the high pressure put on the band to follow up Dark Side Of The Moon, it still has the chops in the compositional department and can be called one of my favorite albums by Pink Floyd. A great album by an excellent band that deserves an addition to any prog rock music collection.

***** star songs: Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Pts. 1-5 (13:40) Wish You Were Here (5:34)

**** star songs: Welcome To The Machine (7:31) Have A Cigar (5:08) Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Pts. 6-9 (12:31)

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Send comments to Rune2000 (BETA) | Report this review (#290183)
Posted Tuesday, July 13, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars In early 1975,Pink Floyd carried the weight of the world in their shoulders.Following the massive success of their modern masterpiece Dark Side of the Moon,the band had acquired a bitter and hateful feeling of desilusion towards the music industry,and now found themselves before the extreme chalenge of creating a follow up to their 1973 magnum opus.

The result was finnaly revealed by the end of that year-an album light years alway from Dark Side.If the latter(in spite of it's name)spoke directly to one's mind and heart in a clearly brilliant and dramatic presentation,Wish You Were Here leaves a bittersweet feeling of confusion.It's glacial sounding(with a brief relief in the title track)may certanily scare some listeners.Instead of the female choruses,rich studio polishment and epic pieces of the previous work,this album is always very distant and disturbing.In the end,though,it speaks as deep in one's soul as did it's predecessor-it may take a very long time for that to be understood,but, from the first listen,it's impossible to stay indiferent towards the depressive atmosphere of this work.

The suit which opens and closes the album(named in a somewhat naive fashion), Shine On You Crazy Diamond,was surprisingly embraced as one of Floyd's ultimate masterpieces.It is a tribute to the band's former leader and genious,Syd Barret,but it's dark sounding sets the tone of the album from the word go.David Gilmour's four-note introduction,in particular,sticks in one's mind as a sinister overture which endures until the music fade out of the speakers.

The album has several moments of cheer muscial brilliance-as in the funky track Have a Cigar(a hilarious attack towards the musical business),or in the synthesysed jam in the last minutes of the final track.But everything here sounds very empty,very distant-and at first may come as a boring collection of studio devices pulled together and mixed in a record.That's why the title track is the one element that places this album in the olympus of rock music-it's exagerated(if placed out of context)melodic outbreak comes as such a stunning relief in the B side,that it is impossible not to be thrilled by it.It sounds as if the band is finnaly able weep their hard feelings after holding them for so long in the first mechanical half of the album.Simply amazing.

From here on,the band would just get colder and colder-their music suddenly started to reflect their inner conlficts(inexistent or very unexpressive by the time of Dark Side of the Moon).Pink Floyd would move to the next stage of their career-that of subtle political and social contestation(in which Roger Waters was the driving force).The perfect balance of their music,however,was last heard in this deeply disturbing and brilliant piece of work.

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Send comments to Gustavo Froes (BETA) | Report this review (#295988)
Posted Tuesday, August 24, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish You Were Here is the second in Pink Floyd's trilogy of masterpiece albums and probably the best of the lot! The album centrex around the Shine On You Crazy Diamond suite , the two halts of which bookend the album very effectively. This suite is IMO Pink Floyd's magnum opus and it proves the band had fully maturedin terms of composing a long song. It's not perfect (some parts of the second half are a bit slow and/or recycled from the first half) but it's damn near. This album is not generally thought of as having a concept but there is one of sorts. A lot of the lyrics are critical of the music industry. The 'Machine' is the music business itself and Welcome To The Machine describes a young musician who's 'been in the pipeline' and emerged into society with no idea of the reality of life in the music business and his naivety allows him to be exploited. This story is reminiscent of Syd Barrett's story who is of course the subject of the Shine On suite. Sleeve designer Storm Thorgerson believes the concept was that of 'unfulfilled presence' and designed the artwork around that idea. I also like the way all the songs segue into one another, especially Have A Cigar into Wish You Were Here, with it sounding like a radio being tuned into the track. Very unique! The title track is one of the most flawless piece of music I've ever heard and it really does chill me out every time I hear the quiet 12 string introduction. I remember my dad playing this album when I was very young so I suppose that made me like it even more and whenever I hear it, it makes me feel calm. It's a personal thing I suppose but this album is good enough for you to like even if you didn't grow up with it.

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED AND ESSENTIAL!

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Send comments to Tull Freak 94 (BETA) | Report this review (#296273)
Posted Thursday, August 26, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars Hard to add anything significant to all the other reviews already done for WISH YOU WERE HERE. Probably every proghead owns a copy of this and there is a reason it has achieved so many 5 star reviews on this site. I enjoy this album much more than any other Pink Floyd along with ANIMALS. It is a step above DARK SIDE OF THE MOON, which I feel has grown stale for me after too many listens. WISH YOU WERE HERE has never grown stale! I cannot find any weakness here, and the production is wonderful. This is an epic album with epic numbers. Enough said. 5 stars with no hesitation at all. Shine on!

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Send comments to mohaveman (BETA) | Report this review (#296372)
Posted Friday, August 27, 2010 | Review Permalink
Evolver
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Crossover & JazzRock/Fusion Teams
5 stars This is another perfect album by Pink Floyd. Every song is just brilliant. All four band members once again were working together to create this masterpiece. Richard Wright in particular stands out more than ever with his tasteful and perfectly toned keyboard passages. David Gilmour plays some of his best guitar solos ever. Of course, they had quite an inspiration in Syd Barrett, the once brilliant leader of the band, at the time of the recording of this album almost unrecognizable even to his former bandmates (look it up).

The major piece, encompassing most of the album is the nine-part Shine On You Crazy Diamond, a slow, but extremely powerful homage to Barrett, written by Roger Waters, Wright and Gilmour. A shortened version of the song still gets airplay, as do each of the other short, but perfect songs.

Rolling Stone said this was number 209 of the top 500 albums of all time. It shows how little they know. Those idiots had The Sex Pistols at number 41.

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Send comments to Evolver (BETA) | Report this review (#304169)
Posted Thursday, October 14, 2010 | Review Permalink
zravkapt
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Post/Math Rock Team
3 stars Both DSOTM and Animals are far superior to this, IMO. Here is where you start to hear this band slowly fall apart. By the time WYWH was being recorded, the band members were starting to drift away from each other. Waters was beginning to be an egomaniac; Wright was starting to be uninterested and a coke-head; Mason seemed to be more interested in cars than music; and Gilmour just wanted to play guitar, man. Both Wright and Gilmour claim this as their favourite Floyd album. All the members hate the more inconsistent but better overall Atom Heart Mother. Silly bastards, who are they to judge their own music?

Everybody knows how this album's concept is about Syd Barrett. Most Floyd fans are aware that Syd even showed up in the studio when they were recording it. Few know that Syd also visited the band when they were recording Atom Heart Mother as well. Trivia rocks! On this album Mason only uses one kick/bass drum. He was one of the first rock drummers to use a double-bass drumkit. On WYWH he could have been replaced by a drum machine. Like DSOTM there is some sax and female backup vocals. The sax playing here is awful. It sounds like an intrusion, it doesn't compliment the music at all. The female vocals are almost pointless and don't add anything like they do on DSOTM.

The lyrics may be some of Waters' best, like the classic line: "The band is just fantastic, that is really what I think/Oh by the way, which one's Pink?" But the music is some of the most uninteresting they had done up to this point. Most of the time they sound like they are on auto-pilot. Just going through the motions. Before this album they attempted to make an album called Household Objects. All the instruments would be...household objects. That concept sounds more interesting than almost anything here. At the beginning of "Shine On" you can hear some wine glasses recorded for the aborted album.

On DSOTM they only used one synthesizer: the EMS Synthi-AKS. Most of the time it was Gilmour and Waters, not Wright playing it. On WYWH that synth is still used(mostly for sound effects), but they had added MiniMoog and ARP Solina. On "Have A Cigar" Wright has the most unique keyboard mix for a Floyd song: Wurlitzer, clavinet and Solina. You never heard him sound funkier. "Welcome To The Machine" is not a very strong song, but it is one of the proggier moments here and the synth playing is good. I like the stereo panning here. I never really cared for the first half of "Shine On". Very dull and boring for the most part. The only parts I like are the guitar and synth solos after the drums kick in. The 4- note guitar part known as "Syd's Theme" is alright the first hundred times you hear it.

The title track here is perhaps the first evidence of the band attempting to "sell out". The lyrics might tie in with the Syd theme, but from a musical point of view it seems as out of place here as the "Pigs On A Wing" tracks are on Animals. It's a nice enough song but it's not prog and Floyd have done many better shorter songs. Roy Harper sings on "Have A Cigar" and apart from his vocals and Wright's playing, this song never interested me much. Gilmour has a few nice solos but he's done much better on other albums. I like the radio seque between "Cigar" and "Wish".

Parts VI-IX of "Shine" have always been my favourite part of the album. Even here I hate the actual vocal parts. The instrumental parts are superb and are the proggiest moments on the album. Well played and sounds great. Animals has stronger music while DSOTM has better production. A good album but nothing more. 3 stars.

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Send comments to zravkapt (BETA) | Report this review (#306012)
Posted Thursday, October 21, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars Wish you were here is a wonderfull album with only one major flaw, Welcome To The Machine, which I just can't understand. The rest if the album is outstanding. Both parts of Shine On You Crazy Diamond are absolutely amazing. The vibe in song is just great, easy to dream away while listening to it. Have A Cigar has one of the best guitar intro's ever, and the song further grew to me over time, becoming one of my favourite Floyd songs. The smooth transition to the title song feels very naturel. The song itself is pretty okay, really good vocals, although i have heard alot of people complain about it. This is the most solid floyd album for me. 5 stars.

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Send comments to Metalbaswee (BETA) | Report this review (#306389)
Posted Sunday, October 24, 2010 | Review Permalink
4 stars I know that everything has been said about this album. No need to do a full scan, I'll just give my personal opinion. The intro to "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond" is superb, spatial, great build up to the part sung. The final with his saxophone solo is equally superb. The second title has always left me somewhat cold. I like the mix of modern sounds and acoustic (guitar) but I find that title a bit long and the singing is, I think, disappointing. Same with the title "Have A Cigar" The part sung is a little weak and musically it is good but far from fantastic. "Wish You Were Here" is the pop song of the album. The riff/ intro with the acoustic guitar is amazing, the lyrics are the best of the album with those of Shine on Your Crazy Diamond. Perfect pop song. The last title and second part of "Shine On Your Crazy Diamond" is just as interesting as it's first part, atmospheric as well but more varied. Very good instrumental parts. Great conclusion. Great album and accessible to the most.

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Send comments to Theriver (BETA) | Report this review (#306609)
Posted Monday, October 25, 2010 | Review Permalink
3 stars Well, deffinitly a good album. Wish you were here is a good song, as is Shine on you Crazy Diamond. My problem with this cd is how boring some of it is. And I like long songs with allot of instrumentals to. But with the first eight minutes of the first Shine On, nothing worthwhile happens, at all. That's eight minutes of useless music. When the verse hits, the song becomes very good until the closing passage where we get more boring Pink Floyd noodling. Also Have a Cigar, is just sort of, there. No opinion. Welcome to the Machine is a good song, but nothing speacial. So overall, a good listen. Very good lyrical moments and melodies, but I've said it once and I'll say it again, Pink Floyd does not have the talent with there instruments to pull off long instrumental moments in songs. They should have stuck to what they were good at, writing melodies and than singing them with the instruments as a back up to the voice. In Floyd the guitar/drums/bass should never steal the show.

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Send comments to Billy Pilgrim (BETA) | Report this review (#306751)
Posted Tuesday, October 26, 2010 | Review Permalink
3 stars 6/10

I'm very sad about Syd. Of course he was important and the band would never have [%*!#]ing started without him because he was writing all the material. It couldn't have happened without him but on the other hand it couldn't have gone on with him. "Shine On" is not really about Syd?he's just a symbol for all the extremes of absence some people have to indulge in because it's the only way they can cope with how [%*!#]ing sad it is, modern life, to withdraw completely. I found that terribly sad.

Roger Waters.

We all know it. It is the fourth best progressive rock album of all time, says the Prog Archives. It's my favorite Pink Floyd, said Richard Wright, David Gilmour and a legion of fans. But for me it is the weakest album of the '70s this band.

I've been a fan of Wish You Were Here . When I reviewed the first time, gave him 5 stars. But since that time I already considered lower than that for me the best Pink Floyd album and one of the best of all time: Dark Side of the Moon. It was hard to believe that WYWH lay ahead. Today I consider it unacceptable. Today I think WYWH deserves no more than three stars.

Over time I have been getting less fan of the long gap that persists in Shine on You Crazy Diamond. I was never attracted to that song, and now I see that its two parts do not have anything special besides the vocal sections and the sax solo, which are divine. Moreover, nothing more. Welcome to Machine is a scary, dark and melancholy music that is dominated by synthesizers, which at first glance it looks good (and it was for me), but now I realize how these synthesizers unnecessarily protracted and the last minutes of music (marked by the characteristic sound effects of the PF) is a waste of time.

The album is saved by two songs, Have a Cigar and the title track. The first is the breath of joy from the album, marked by the vocals of Roy Harper. And the second ... ah ... ank just one of my favorite of all time. In my opinion it is what makes this album worth.

Finally, the only thing I can conclude Wish You Were Here is that it is good, but it is very overrated and not all who speak it. while there are Dark Side Of The Moon, The Wall and Animals , it will not be in my heart.

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Send comments to voliveira (BETA) | Report this review (#307721)
Posted Sunday, October 31, 2010 | Review Permalink
5 stars I agree with the many other reviewers on the prog archives that this album is an amazing work of art and one of the greatest musical achievements of all time. I first heard it as a teenager, alone with a pair of headphones in a dark, quiet room. I was mesmerized to say the least. I still get the same feeling whenever I hear it all these years later.

The real wizard behind the deeply atomspheric sound was Richard Wright. The sounds from the synthsizers and clavinet are abosolutely gorgeous and impressive. Gilmour's bluesy guitar is also very touching. The main piece "Shine On You Crazy Diamond" is mostly instrumental. The sax parts are fantastic and a perfect addition to the moody music. Waters' idea to split the long track into two parts and to throw three compositions in between was an excellent idea.

In "Welcome To The Machine" the keyboards are softened by some acoustic guitar. The vocals are cold and dark as the song itself is about oppression and technological fear. I've never heard anything like it. The title track is much brighter and the second half of the album is slightly bluesy. The album nicely ends in a similar swirling mood as the opening part.

It's an emotional, captivating ride from start to finish. There's a good reason why so many other prog fans rave about it. 5 shining stars from this reviwer to add to the overall rating.

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Send comments to Frankie Flowers (BETA) | Report this review (#349672)
Posted Saturday, December 11, 2010 | Review Permalink
lazland
PROG REVIEWER
4 stars So, you create a commercial monster, change the rules of rock, have all sorts of people laud you as the greatest musical happening since Wolfgang Mozart (all of which happened after DSOTM). What do you do next?

The greatest compliment you can pay to Pink Floyd is that they resisted the temptation to create a direct sequel to DSOTM. Instead, they came up with an album which feels and sounds wholly different, is far more symphonic, and also lays to rest the ghosts they had carried with Syd, not just by the way they said goodbye and paid tribute to him on the album, but also finally put aside all psychedelic rock to a very straightforward symphonic collection of songs.

David Gilmour has long stated that he regards this as the band's finest moment, and it is also the highest rated Floyd album on this site. It is, without a shadow of a doubt, an absolute classic, and a very important album in the annals of rock music, not merely progressive rock. Roger Waters revisits his major theme of madness, but also very cleverly integrates this into a none too subtle rant against the record companies (and EMI in particular). In hindsight, it is clear that the massive commercial success of DSOTM, and the wealth that this brought to the son of a Communist Party activist, provided extremely mixed blessings. I would also wager that many of the record company executives listening to this at the time just before release probably didn't have the wit to appreciate that it was they who were being confronted in such a brazen fashion.

It is also a very clever album in terms of its music. That massive chord change five minutes into Shine On, the exemplary sax solo by Dick Parry, and the (then) groundbreaking special musical effects, particularly on Welcome To The Machine. They also manage to create quite possibly the most laid back and understated rock anthem of all time in the title track, proving yet again that, in most cases, simplicity was as, if not more, effective than long and complex time signatures from their peers.

It is not, though, to these ears, the epitome of Pink Floyd in the studio. That would wait for the follow up and The Wall in my opinion. The Wright keyboard mid section in Welcome To The Machine sounds slightly dated now. In addition, Have A Cigar, whilst lyrically scathing and hilarious, does have a touch of the record filler attached to it. These are, though, minor quibbles. The symphonic suite that is Shine On is nigh on perfect, and the band never sounded as good musically as they did on this, and the Gilmour riff on the second part has, rightly, been lauded as one of the finest of all time.

I would award this 4.5 stars if I could on the site. I will, for the purposes of this review, round it down to 4 stars, if only because I feel that its immediate predecessor and two sequels are utter masterpieces, whilst this just, only just, falls short.

As I said on my DSOTM review, though, I can't see how anybody reading this hasn't already got it.

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Send comments to lazland (BETA) | Report this review (#349934)
Posted Saturday, December 11, 2010 | Review Permalink
octopus-4
SPECIAL COLLABORATOR
RIO/Avant/Zeuhl Team
5 stars I've seen David Gilmour saying in an intervies that he was playing an A7- chord when he played by mistake the most famous 4-notes sequence after the opening of Beethoven 5th symphony.

During a session of the studio rehearsals of Dark Side they saw a fat man with no hair looking at them from out of the studio glass window at Abbey Road. Only after he left they realised that he was Syd Barrett. This is the episode at the base of Wish You Were Here.

The rest is well known by everybody, also the non-proggers, so I will write just few more lines.

Shine on You Crazy Diamond was intended as a single track that was split in two because of its length. The first recorded version that I have found on a rarities boxset had rumours of rain, winds and thuinders in the background for all the about 30 minutes of the suite. Regardless this noise that's not too disturbing, having the opportunity to listen to the whole suite in one shot enhances the experience. It occupies more than half of the album and is with no doubts a five-stars track.

"Welcome to the Machine" is one of the most politically influenced songs of Roger Waters. He took something from Chaplin's Modern Times, the rest comes from his socialist origins. Add a touch of musical genius in the composition and the effort of the whole band.

"Have A Cigar" with its rock opening is an invective against the star system, something that has surely contributed in making Syd's disturbs more sever